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-   -   Klipsch Forte Mark III Speakers Demo at CES 2017 (https://www.avsforum.com/forum/89-speakers/2705529-klipsch-forte-mark-iii-speakers-demo-ces-2017-a.html)

imagic 01-06-2017 01:52 PM

Klipsch Forte Mark III Speakers Released and CES 2017 Demo
 
I had a chance to hear the new, U.S. built Forte Mark III at CES 2017 and they delivered the goods... click the link for more: https://www.avsforum.com/best-ces-kli...speakers-demo/

Update! The Forte III is now available to purchase. Read more by clicking here: Klipsch Releases New Forte III Heritage Series Speakers

Robertr2 01-06-2017 02:45 PM

Crap. I bought new HeresyIII's about 6 months ago. I was looking for some used Forte II , but I was worried about buying used without hearing since there were none in my area.

Sounds like I have about 6 months to save up $3800. From the reviews on the past edition Fortes, I am wanting bad....

They will be mine!

nowHT 01-06-2017 05:46 PM

I cannot wait until I can demo a pair. I have been a big fan of the heresys.

TuteTibiImperes 01-06-2017 06:38 PM

Klipsch looks like they're really going whole-hog on the heritage design stuff. They have a very cool steampunk looking integrated amp coming out:


Plus a set of bluetooth/wifi speakers featuring a compression driver and 15" woofers:

http://assets.klipsch.com/images/Kli...e-Fifteens.jpg

According to one of the Abt vidoes the Forte III will go for $3,800/pair in standard finishes.

imagic 01-06-2017 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuteTibiImperes (Post 49644521)
Klipsch looks like they're really going whole-hog on the heritage design stuff. They have a very cool steampunk looking integrated amp coming out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ksk1e6lXAU

Plus a set of bluetooth/wifi speakers featuring a compression driver and 15" woofers:

http://assets.klipsch.com/images/Kli...e-Fifteens.jpg

According to one of the Abt vidoes the Forte III will go for $3,800/pair in standard finishes.

Yup I have tons more to post...

18Hurts 01-07-2017 12:10 PM

Very cool,

Like the integrated amp, small, real wood, real metal but stuffed with modern tech amplifiers, wireless and the OLED screen that blacks out. Looking forward to the speaker reviews/testing as Klipsch becomes more PWK and less...shiny style stuff. Sometimes a buyout can improve the breed--bring on the test instruments and see if the looks, performance and quality matches the promise. :cool:

Rob-Houston 01-08-2017 10:02 AM

I inherited a pair of Forte II's when my brother died. They've been doing duty in my family room theater for atleast 10 years. Always considered them to be Klipsch's only rock oriented speaker because of the passive rear driver.

They handle more volume than I want to listen to. I still don't have a sub there because they could vibrate my couch and and now my home theater recliners more than I want them to. ;):rolleyes:

Mr_Movie_Dog 01-17-2017 06:15 PM

Glad to see the Forte in the light of day again, I bought the original speakers in 1985 when they came out and loved them, but then bought the Chorus followed by the KLF 20's and LaScalla's which hands down the LaScalla's are some of the best Klipsch speakers to date in my opinion. I have a friend that would argue that for Rock the best speakers are the RF7's, they are hard driving live speakers, but for myself they lack the imaging and dynamic range I prefer, however I do like them.

Now if they, I don't mean Klipsch, could bring back the old RTR Towers with Electrostatic Tweeters, WOW what a stack up that was, there's an oldie, that was around the old Quadraphonic systems time for us old timers.

I was glad to hear that AVS demo'd the Monoprice 15" passive PA's as I've been considering them for quite a while now, the one thing holding me back was they are too inexpensive and I thought they might be poor speakers. Seeing the good review here makes me consider them more for a traveling sound stage speaker that I can use with my pro gear setup and not have to worry about, just one more choice and again inexpensive.

gajCA 01-18-2017 12:53 PM

If I had the room in my house I'd definitely have some old school heritage Klipsch.

LumensLover 01-18-2017 09:14 PM

Love my old school Fortes. But there is no way I would pay almost $4,000 for a new pair. These can't touch Klipsch pro cinema line which are far more cost effective.

DVDMike 01-24-2017 12:42 PM

I grew up with LaScallas in the 70's then my dad replaced them with a pair of Forte I's. Later, I purchased my own pair of Forte II's. I still use them as my primary pair in my media room. I also own a pair of oak quartets which are now up for sale after I enherited my dads oak Fortes, which still look and sound beautiful. My dad had some reason to call the factory after the Forte II came out and apparently he spoke with an engineer there that told him they got the Forte right in the first iteration. Since I have both, I could compare them, but they are too heavy to warrant moving them around to do the comparison.

My dad sold his LaScallas for something like $400 in 1985. I wish he had kept them but he was downsizing and they needed to go. I really do not have a space large enough for them but they where my favorite of all the klipsch I've ever had in a home I lived in. Their bass was surprisingly limited given the size of the woofer. But paired now with a good 15" sub, I'd bet they would sound incredible. And so efficient to boot.

I also had a pair of KG4's that had the passive radiator too. And i still own a pair of KG2 which are my front speakers in my sunroom Atmos setup. I was a big fan of that eras klipsch wood speakers.

I'd love to hear the new Forte III speakers.

PrestigeAudio 01-24-2017 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LumensLover (Post 50013569)
Love my old school Fortes. But there is no way I would pay almost $4,000 for a new pair. These can't touch Klipsch pro cinema line which are far more cost effective.

Totally different speakers for a totally different purpose. Apples to oranges here.

LumensLover 01-25-2017 03:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio (Post 50171177)
Totally different speakers for a totally different purpose. Apples to oranges here.

Klipsch Jubilees will outperform these speakers with two channel music and clean, precise dialogue for movies. Only reason to pay for something such as these new Fortes is if the large size of Klipsch pro Cinema line is a problem for a multipurpose room.

aschen 01-25-2017 09:35 AM

I had a pair of Forte II in college (mid 90s). I think I paid 1200 per pair? Either inflation has been worse than I thought or I am older than I think! I really liked those speakers and they could rock my whole dorm building on 50 wpc> they got credit for at least 1 police noise violation call.


Great speakers, not at 4k though unless they are supstantially better than earlier versions. I see chorus and fortes on craigslist for 600-800$ asking occasionally

TuteTibiImperes 07-25-2017 10:11 AM

That distressed oak finish is sharp. Getting a closer look at the horns now that Klipsch has more images up, the new midrange horn bears a resemblance to JBL's image control waveguide.

DS-21 07-25-2017 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LumensLover (Post 50013569)
Love my old school Fortes. But there is no way I would pay almost $4,000 for a new pair. These can't touch Klipsch pro cinema line which are far more cost effective.

Funny, I had the opposite reaction: I was surprised they kept the price reasonable. Decent finishes cost money.

Quote:

Originally Posted by LumensLover (Post 50189113)
Klipsch Jubilees will outperform these speakers with two channel music and clean, precise dialogue for movies.

It seems the Jubilees have some interesting technology to them. It would be nice to see Klipsch marry that CD horn contour (I read "Tractix" and completely lose interest) to a nice looking speaker at a mid-end price. Think JBL 4367 size and finish (or better) and Revel Performa3 pricing.

rcapprotti 07-26-2017 08:19 AM

i have a pair of Klipsch forte I they are great speakers bought them used to have less than $275 in them

Reddig 07-26-2017 08:45 AM

Ive always loved Klipsch Heritage. The Forte Mark III looks like an fantastic speaker. Beautiful finishes to boot.

adam2434 07-26-2017 11:40 AM

Forte III owners comments are very positive on the Klipsch forum.

I'd like to see some professional reviews with measurements.

I also have a pair of Forte I. Picked them up a few months ago and replaced all of the crossover capacitors. I use them in the unfinished portion of my basement. The Forte I (and later versions, I'm sure) are very dynamic and can output high SPL without signs of strain. However, the upper midrange can sound a bit shouty and forward at times. I'v read that the II version midrange horn mitigates this. The III version midrange horn is supposed to be the latest and greatest design.

esappy 07-27-2017 08:10 AM

I was fortunate enough to get to hear these last night at my local dealer. They were hosting a listening party with Matt (can't remember his last name) from Klipsch presenting the Forte III's (in one of the 70 special edition California black walnut veneers), having a Q&A session, playing a whole list of music and then playing some audience requests. It was a good time, and even though I am not particularly a Klipsch fan per se, I was very pleased with what I heard. First and foremost, they are very musical. They can throw a very wide soundstage. I was standing off to the side of the room for most of the demo at I was surprised at how the image stayed mostly centered in the room. The room they were in had treatments on the walls and had heavy curtains in the front so it's not overly lively. The speakers had great energy and sounded effortless. They sounded lively without sounding harsh in this room. So I can imagine that in a much more lively room these speakers could sound quite bright. Discussion with Matt revealed that these speakers do require care with placement and that they are meant to be placed relatively close to the wall instead of being way out in the room. In the room we were in they were about 2ft off the front wall and had slight toe in. The design philosophy of these was to just keep it simple and use mechanical means to present the sound (e.g. using compression drivers with carefully designed horns for the mid and high range, and a 12" woofer (designed by Peerless) coupled to a passive radiator) and keep the crossover network simple. All I know is that they did sound great and I enjoyed them. But no, I didn't take them home. :p

newbe2 07-28-2017 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LumensLover (Post 50013569)
Love my old school Fortes. But there is no way I would pay almost $4,000 for a new pair. These can't touch Klipsch pro cinema line which are far more cost effective.

My left and right are Patrician 4s and I've heard nothing that can compete. I use the heresy as my center and EV Sp12B's as my surrounds. The surrounds might benefit from some high end addition, we'll see.
I separated the wiring and use another amp to power the bass life a subwoofer.
Happy audio video lover.

coytee 07-29-2017 06:27 AM

"Love my old school Fortes. But there is no way I would pay almost $4,000 for a new pair. These can't touch Klipsch pro cinema line which are far more cost effective."

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio (Post 50171177)
Totally different speakers for a totally different purpose. Apples to oranges here.

Perhaps that depends...

The Forte was a speaker designed specifically for residential use. So it has an engineered sound and some aesthetics applied. It is what it is (for better or worse)

The Jubilee (a pro cinema speaker) was also specifically designed for residential use. It was originally intended to become the Klipschorn II and PWK felt it bested the Khorn by such a margin it deserved its own place in the line-up. The company had other plans and it was shelved. It later emerged in the cinema line.

So here, you have a speaker, specifically designed for residential use. It has an engineered sound and no aesthetics applied. Now you're getting a better value for your dollar for sound since you are not also paying for a pretty dress and some lipstick.

(they are however about twice as expensive)

PrestigeAudio 07-31-2017 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coytee (Post 54549104)
"Love my old school Fortes. But there is no way I would pay almost $4,000 for a new pair. These can't touch Klipsch pro cinema line which are far more cost effective."



Perhaps that depends...

The Forte was a speaker designed specifically for residential use. So it has an engineered sound and some aesthetics applied. It is what it is (for better or worse)

The Jubilee (a pro cinema speaker) was also specifically designed for residential use. It was originally intended to become the Klipschorn II and PWK felt it bested the Khorn by such a margin it deserved its own place in the line-up. The company had other plans and it was shelved. It later emerged in the cinema line.

So here, you have a speaker, specifically designed for residential use. It has an engineered sound and no aesthetics applied. Now you're getting a better value for your dollar for sound since you are not also paying for a pretty dress and some lipstick.

(they are however about twice as expensive)

What are you basing your claims of what the Jubilee was designed for on? Not asking sarcastically, but I would love to read some sort of links or hear where you actually got or verified this idea from.

Everything points to the Jubilee being a giant speaker designed for auditoriums and commercial theaters. That's not necessarily hitting the bulls-eye on high fidelity music reproduction and imaging in a residential environment. While I'm sure they exist, the market for 200+ seat, 5000 square foot home theater rooms is too small for anyone to design speakers for this type of market.

Spending the money and using the space it would take on a Jubilee system for a residential space and seating is an asinine to me unless someone just thinks the look and idea of huge speakers like that is what they're going for.

Speaker design is a battle of compromise. The Jubilee is a very large speaker with huge dispersion and very high output/volumes. Enough to cover 300+ seating. There is always a trade off for those capabilities and it's typically accuracy and imaging.

Another way over looked real life concern is that when you (metaphorically) wedge 50lbs of a commercial grade speaker, and shove it into a 10lbs bag (a residential sized theater space) what do you think happens with it's widely dispersed wave forms? Do you know the acoustical nightmare that will cause in a residential room and seating distance/positions? It's all draw back and no benefit. The residential marketed speakers are better in all aspects when it comes to real world and real life performance in residential rooms.

And where this notion of "pro" speakers sounding better than residential hifi gear and that residential stuff is the same thing, but prettier and more expensive came from is beyond me. I've been doing this for 18 years. NEVER... EVER have I come across a "pro" grade speaker that sounded outstanding. NEVER. And I've worked with or heard just about everything under the sun. Most commercial speakers are designed... again... to do 3 specific things and that's usually play loud, have wide coverage or specific wave forms to hit different seating widths, depths, etc, and be (relative to the project/capabilities) cheap in doing so.

I just put in some Revel outdoor speakers that use the exact same cabinet and mounting system as the JBL pro grade outdoor commercial speakers, but they (Harman) changed the drivers and crossover in them. Do you know why? Because the commercial stuff isn't made for hi-fidelity and sounds like crap when compared to what someone would expect in their house when listening for an extended period of time.

When it comes to theater usage, I'm sure the general tonality of sound is similar. But with the wave forms coming out of that Jubilee, that would be so hard to tame! Musically, no way.

But, just because I'm always open to learning something, I will call my contacts at Klipsch and report back what they say. This is the technology business. I am 100% open to being wrong. hell, I LOVE it when I am because then I can get it right and keep progressing!

LumensLover 07-31-2017 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio (Post 54559208)
What are you basing your claims of what the Jubilee was designed for on? Not asking sarcastically, but I would love to read some sort of links or hear where you actually got or verified this idea from.

Everything points to the Jubilee being a giant speaker designed for auditoriums and commercial theaters. That's not necessarily hitting the bulls-eye on high fidelity music reproduction and imaging in a residential environment. While I'm sure they exist, the market for 200+ seat, 5000 square foot home theater rooms is too small for anyone to design speakers for this type of market.

Spending the money and using the space it would take on a Jubilee system for a residential space and seating is an asinine to me unless someone just thinks the look and idea of huge speakers like that is what they're going for.

Speaker design is a battle of compromise. The Jubilee is a very large speaker with huge dispersion and very high output/volumes. Enough to cover 300+ seating. There is always a trade off for those capabilities and it's typically accuracy and imaging.

Another way over looked real life concern is that when you (metaphorically) wedge 50lbs of a commercial grade speaker, and shove it into a 10lbs bag (a residential sized theater space) what do you think happens with it's widely dispersed wave forms? Do you know the acoustical nightmare that will cause in a residential room and seating distance/positions? It's all draw back and no benefit. The residential marketed speakers are better in all aspects when it comes to real world and real life performance in residential rooms.

And where this notion of "pro" speakers sounding better than residential hifi gear and that residential stuff is the same thing, but prettier and more expensive came from is beyond me. I've been doing this for 18 years. NEVER... EVER have I come across a "pro" grade speaker that sounded outstanding. NEVER. And I've worked with or heard just about everything under the sun. Most commercial speakers are designed... again... to do 3 specific things and that's usually play loud, have wide coverage or specific wave forms to hit different seating widths, depths, etc, and be (relative to the project/capabilities) cheap in doing so.

I just put in some Revel outdoor speakers that use the exact same cabinet and mounting system as the JBL pro grade outdoor commercial speakers, but they (Harman) changed the drivers and crossover in them. Do you know why? Because the commercial stuff isn't made for hi-fidelity and sounds like crap when compared to what someone would expect in their house when listening for an extended period of time.

When it comes to theater usage, I'm sure the general tonality of sound is similar. But with the wave forms coming out of that Jubilee, that would be so hard to tame! Musically, no way.

But, just because I'm always open to learning something, I will call my contacts at Klipsch and report back what they say. This is the technology business. I am 100% open to being wrong. hell, I LOVE it when I am because then I can get it right and keep progressing!

This post is 100% bullfeces.

coytee 07-31-2017 07:03 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio (Post 54559208)
What are you basing your claims of what the Jubilee was designed for on? Not asking sarcastically, but I would love to read some sort of links or hear where you actually got or verified this idea from.

It was co-designed by Roy Delgado who was PWK's "right hand man" for a number of years. I have dined with Roy and visited with him on several occasions. I have owned the Jubilee's for 11 years. I believe Roy's name is on the AES design, I'll try to attach a link to it (I found it on the Klipsch forum)

Link: https://community.klipsch.com/index....er-re-jubilee/



Everything points to the Jubilee being a giant speaker designed for auditoriums and commercial theaters. That's not necessarily hitting the bulls-eye on high fidelity music reproduction and imaging in a residential environment. While I'm sure they exist, the market for 200+ seat, 5000 square foot home theater rooms is too small for anyone to design speakers for this type of market.

The Klipschorn is also a giant speaker. The Jubilee was designed to have the same footprint as the Khorn, keep (or improve) the bottom end extension and mostly, raise the crossover point so the Khorn could be taken back to a 2-way speaker (which was PWK's desire from day one) The fact that a speaker designed specifically for residential use can be used in a 300/400 seat auditorium should say a lot about its abilities. One of them being, the general home owner will never (ever) actually push it to its limits so as a side benefit, I have tons and tons of head room and tons and tons of dynamics. You do know it's a bass horn and to get some bottom end extension, it has to be big? (I'm presuming you know that but you seem surprised at the size)

Spending the money and using the space it would take on a Jubilee system for a residential space and seating is an asinine to me unless someone just thinks the look and idea of huge speakers like that is what they're going for.

Then you are simply ignorant about horns, specifically bass horns. You would also be ignorant (as defined as not knowing, I'm not calling you any ugly names) anyway keep in mind that my Jubilee's, actively biamped with a dedicated Crown K2 per speaker can still play as quiet and subtle as your (insert your favorite brand) speaker AND still have the room to trounce it with dynamics and if need be, volume.

Speaker design is a battle of compromise. The Jubilee is a very large speaker with huge dispersion and very high output/volumes. Enough to cover 300+ seating. There is always a trade off for those capabilities and it's typically accuracy and imaging.

Hear them once and your fog will be lifted. As a side note, I'm guessing you feel the Klipschorn (a speaker that has been around for 70 years now??) is too big/ugly for anything other than a gymnasium?

Another way over looked real life concern is that when you (metaphorically) wedge 50lbs of a commercial grade speaker, and shove it into a 10lbs bag (a residential sized theater space) what do you think happens with it's widely dispersed wave forms? Do you know the acoustical nightmare that will cause in a residential room and seating distance/positions? It's all draw back and no benefit. The residential marketed speakers are better in all aspects when it comes to real world and real life performance in residential rooms.

And what happens when you put a horn with controlled directivity into a room?
Less splashing of the sound and FEWER destructive interactions. Though it seems counter intuitive, a bigger horn is actually better than a smaller one. This was easily proved in their chamber where we did some listening and were able to walk around/behind the speaker to hear.
The larger horn kept a LOT more sound from 'splashing around' the side of the speaker so it kept more sound OFF the side walls. Pictures attached taken during actual event




And where this notion of "pro" speakers sounding better than residential hifi gear and that residential stuff is the same thing, but prettier and more expensive came from is beyond me. I've been doing this for 18 years. NEVER... EVER have I come across a "pro" grade speaker that sounded outstanding. NEVER. And I've worked with or heard just about everything under the sun. Most commercial speakers are designed... again... to do 3 specific things and that's usually play loud, have wide coverage or specific wave forms to hit different seating widths, depths, etc, and be (relative to the project/capabilities) cheap in doing so.

18 years? Good for you. As stated, I've owned the Jubilee's for 11 years and "been doing this" for 39 years. Heck, I've even owned my LaScalas alone for 38 years

I just put in some Revel outdoor speakers that use the exact same cabinet and mounting system as the JBL pro grade outdoor commercial speakers, but they (Harman) changed the drivers and crossover in them. Do you know why? Because the commercial stuff isn't made for hi-fidelity and sounds like crap when compared to what someone would expect in their house when listening for an extended period of time.

When it comes to theater usage, I'm sure the general tonality of sound is similar. But with the wave forms coming out of that Jubilee, that would be so hard to tame! Musically, no way.

Interestingly, it was the intro to Hotel California, right up to that initial 'boom' of the drum, that made me decide to buy them. I sold my Khorns (literally) that week, within 3 hours of listing them.

As a side comment, just in case they meet your approval, I'm using a TAD 4002 driver on my top horn.
It seems to be a nice sounding driver. It covers from (if I recall) about 380Hz on up so essentially half of my sound is "TAD sound" I did however forget... don't they use those in pro/cinema applications too? More dreck I suppose?


But, just because I'm always open to learning something, I will call my contacts at Klipsch and report back what they say. This is the technology business. I am 100% open to being wrong. hell, I LOVE it when I am because then I can get it right and keep progressing!

I've been told the original design of the Jubilee (with a pretty skirt and some lipstick) was intended to MSRP around $20/25K for a pair. You can buy the exact same bass horn, BETTER top horn and have it delivered to your home for "about" $9,000. Seems skirts & lipstick can be expensive ;)

coytee 07-31-2017 07:04 PM

That red is almost harsh... my apologies in advance. Should have considered blue

coytee 07-31-2017 07:48 PM

Side comment (from the engineers mouth to my ears), "Klipsch designs all their speakers for high fidelity, we do not differentiate between home & cinema"

Maybe not exact words but the exact meaning is there.

Robertr2 08-04-2017 01:11 PM

I have a pair of Forte III. Great sounding speakers. I've had many different Klipsch speakers, including RP-280 and Heresy. These sound awesome.

The issue I have is I bought the Cherry. My Heresy were also Cherry. I had heard the new finish was a couple shade lighter. I looked on the website, and they looked cherry, a few shades lighter then the Heresy. No, these look like a pine finish. Light as pine. The front of edge of one of them looked like it had a dent in it. Ran my finger on it, and I guess my fingernail hit the varnish and scratched it. These are so light, it looks like the wood was burnt somewhat when it was planed. This has left dark swirls under the clear varnish. The swirls are not the wood grain. Very disappointed in high priced speakers.

I saw two sets at my dealer. Both were the special editions. The woodwork was fantastic on those. I've been communicating with Klipsch, but they seem to not care. Sent a picture of the "dent" on the front. They say wood has various qualities. I realize that. However, this is made from "B stock" wood and it is unacceptable to pay this much for something that does not look like quality.

Closing, totally awesome sounding speakers, very impressed by the sound. Best sounding I have ever heard. The cabinetry is not up to Klipsch standards for the Heritage series.

Disappointed.


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