Kef R series questions - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 3Likes
  • 3 Post By PrestigeAudio
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 02:10 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 1
Lightbulb Kef R series questions

Hi folks, 3 questions:

1) Has anyone heard the difference between the R5 and the R7? For a 5.1 setup do I get much more from the R7?
2) The R3s are too big for me to use as surrounds in my room. Would the R100s or the Q150s work as a substitute? Any other suggestions?
3) What avr would people recommend? I currently have a Dennon x3200w, but I'm afraid this receiver wouldn't do these speakers any justice.

Thanks in advance for your help.

~ hifi newb
Mick1234 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 03:31 AM
Senior Member
 
Dargent0628's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 418
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 228 Post(s)
Liked: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mick1234 View Post
Hi folks, 3 questions:

1) Has anyone heard the difference between the R5 and the R7? For a 5.1 setup do I get much more from the R7?
2) The R3s are too big for me to use as surrounds in my room. Would the R100s or the Q150s work as a substitute? Any other suggestions?
3) What avr would people recommend? I currently have a Dennon x3200w, but I'm afraid this receiver wouldn't do these speakers any justice.

Thanks in advance for your help.

~ hifi newb
No firsthand experienced with the speakers, but if you are going to spend that much coin (congratulations) on that tier of speaker then you might consider upgrading your Denon to one that has the "platinum" Audyssey with MultiEQ XT32. Also, your current receiver does have preouts if you want to add an amp to drive your fronts, although at 8 ohm they should be an easy load.

Others will chime in--it is helpful to provide the size/characteristics of your room, your listening habits (movies/music ratio, how( loud you listen...) and your distance from your speakers at the main listening position.

What are your center channel/subwoofer choices?

Surround speakers only communicate a tiny percentage of information relative to the LCR ' s of your HT system. I would think that any KEF with UniQ driver (Q150 reduced to $299.00) would be fine.
Dargent0628 is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 04:39 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: NB, Canada
Posts: 1,006
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 543 Post(s)
Liked: 303
R7 fronts with Q100 rears (Q100 front ports make them easier for placement). If you surrounds won't be close to walls then the R100/Q150 is fine.
x3200w will be fine since you can always add power if needed.

You'll mostly notice a difference with the R7 when you listening to music in 2.0

Speakers: KEF Q100, Q300, Q750, Q650C / Fluance Signature Series Bookshelf, SX6, XL5F/ Mirage M-190 / DCM TP160S-CH Subwoofers: Outlaw Ultra X12 (x2) / BIC H100-II
Receiver: Denon AVR-X4500H, AVR-X1400H Integrated Amplifier: Yamaha A-S501/ Fosi Audio TPA3116 mini amp Extras: MiniDSP Umik-1 Amplifier: Emotiva BasX-A300
macgallant is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 05:08 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dargent0628 View Post
No firsthand experienced with the speakers, but if you are going to spend that much coin (congratulations) on that tier of speaker then you might consider upgrading your Denon to one that has the "platinum" Audyssey with MultiEQ XT32. Also, your current receiver does have preouts if you want to add an amp to drive your fronts, although at 8 ohm they should be an easy load.

Others will chime in--it is helpful to provide the size/characteristics of your room, your listening habits (movies/music ratio, how( loud you listen...) and your distance from your speakers at the main listening position.

What are your center channel/subwoofer choices?

Surround speakers only communicate a tiny percentage of information relative to the LCR ' s of your HT system. I would think that any KEF with UniQ driver (Q150 reduced to $299.00) would be fine.
50:50 music : movies. I figure I will run just the front two speakers for music (I assume my receiver can do this).

Room is 5m x 7m, but tv area is 5m x 4m, so there will be a bit of space behind the rears. The center seat will be around 3.5m from the front speakers.

Thanks for the tip on the Audyssey; I will investigate.

Planned center speaker will probably be the R2c just to keep things consistent up front. Open to suggestions on subs.
Mick1234 is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 07:02 AM
Advanced Member
 
modenacart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked: 180
There is a KEF forum in the speaker section. I recommend you ask the question there. You are more likely to find people with direct experience.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
modenacart is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 06:50 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 437
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mick1234 View Post
Hi folks, 3 questions:

1) Has anyone heard the difference between the R5 and the R7? For a 5.1 setup do I get much more from the R7?
2) The R3s are too big for me to use as surrounds in my room. Would the R100s or the Q150s work as a substitute? Any other suggestions?
3) What avr would people recommend? I currently have a Dennon x3200w, but I'm afraid this receiver wouldn't do these speakers any justice.

Thanks in advance for your help.

~ hifi newb
I'm a KEF dealer and have been for nearly 10 years, so I have significant experience with the models you're asking about as well as their predecessors. The R series is a unique and beautiful product. Clients have said they get compliments and questions about them all the time and have been very very pleased.

Some notes regarding your questions...

- For theater duties in a 5.1 (or any multi-channel setup, really) there won't be a world of difference between the R7 & R5 until you get up into trying to do some higher volume listening (theater levels) or if you're in a upper medium to large room. For example: My room is 13'x25'x8' = 2,600 cubic feet - under THX Ultra2 spec - and I sit 13' & 17' away. Either speaker would do well, with the R7 being the "bigger', fuller sounding setup.

- For 2 channel music, the R7 will be the winner there. No question. The trick, though, will be placement. You will want the R7 set correctly for your room to get their best performance. If you will be constrained in space or having to stick these right up against a boundary or corner, I would recommend the smaller R5 as it will be easier to integrate into a space like that.

- I'm of a different opinion than the others here when it comes to the surrounds. Whenever budget allows voice matching or speakers of the same series is typically the ideal. You can get away with stepping down if you need, but here is why I usually recommend staying in series.

The reasons are numerous. In no particular order...

1: The R-Series has a distinct and beautiful look. Having those up front and then the Q series in the back won't be as aesthetically uniform and will look like a half measure.

2: Uniform Sound. Setting aside digital surround sound, lets look at another common sound format: Multi Channel Stereo. I listen to lots of content this way - some music, sporting evens, most TV shows. You can absolutely, positively tell a difference between speaker grades in this format as they are all playing at once.

^ As someone that enjoys a fair amount of content in all channel stereo, the above is important enough to me that, in my personal systems, everything is series or voice matched as close as possible. Especially since when my kid goes to bed I like to have a lower volume, but still want to hear everything as I walk around the house or move around. The difference in quality between front & back can be apparent in this sound mode.

3: Similar Capabilities. Having a system where the fronts are able to play larger volume levels without distortion or cabinet resonances is awesome... until the rears can't match them and become obvious weak points in the room. If matching the R series in the surrounds is out due to $, the others are good in the recommendation of stepping down to the Q series.

^ I would even look at the Q series in-wall speakers if that type of install's an option as they wouldn't be as visually different and relatively stealthy.

- On the receiver front, If yours seems a little weak (it just might) I'm a dealer of Denon, Marantz, Onkyo, Pioneer/Elite, Integra, and others. I tend to cherry pick for what the project needs, but my favorite receiver line is the Yamaha Aventage Line. The RX-A2080 would be an outstanding receiver for your room size and either of those speakers.

I'm going to have to try Onkyo's new RZ line just to see how I feel about it. There are aspects of those that look outstanding. I haven't ventured into the receiver thread to read opinions, and I probably won't. I like to try things without expectation.

- Regarding room correction: IMO, the benefits are WAY overblown and overstated. I've seen some incredible assertions where people hype up room correction as if it's some sort of crappy system or room fixing silver bullet. It's not. It can help, or it can hurt. We rarely use it on our projects as it can make a mess of things and be a waste of time. My hands are on a lot of receivers a year. They all have their plus & minus sides.

I would rarely, if ever recommend buying one receiver over another because of it's software. I think it's something to talk about, so guys bring it up like it's some saving grace, miracle potion for bad choices. If your room is acoustically bad, fix it in the physical realm first. If your speakers sound bad.... buy proper ones. Software isn't going to make bad speakers sound good, but if can make good speakers sound bad.

Buy your receiver based on DURABILITY, POWER, INPUTS, and then... somewhere down the line is software that you may or may not use. The forum is littered with, I would guess, a hundred threads praising or damning each manufacturer's auto-cal. The flavor of the month changes all the time. My professional opinion is to try it with out, try it with, and then choose one and mess with it to your liking.

Feel free to ask questions. I'm sure others will chime in with their experiences as well. Best of luck to you!
airgas1998, MrMustard and Mick1234 like this.

Last edited by PrestigeAudio; 02-01-2019 at 06:55 PM.
PrestigeAudio is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 02-01-2019, 08:23 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Espo77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland
Posts: 3,305
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked: 226
[QUOTE=PrestigeAudio;57537990]I'm a KEF dealer and have been for nearly 10 years, so I have significant experience with the models you're asking about as well as their predecessors.


I'm going to have to try Onkyo's new RZ line just to see how I feel about it. There are aspects of those that look outstanding.
Curious as to what aspects of the RZ line look outstanding to you?


- Regarding room correction: IMO, the benefits are WAY overblown and overstated. We rarely use it on our projects as it can make a mess of things and be a waste of time.
...but you do use an SLP Meter don’t you?
...you want to volume/level match all channels correct?
...do you measure speaker distances to the seating area manually so that you can add the proper delay?
...what about EQ?
...do you use it to tame/reduce certain frequencies?

Espo77's living room equipment: RECEIVER: Yamaha RX-A3030- SPEAKERS: Boston Acoustics M350, M25 center, surrounds, and front heights-
BLU-RAY: Oppo BDP103D- SUBWOOFER: HSU VTF-15H MK2- dedicated circuits for A/V- TV: Vizio P55C-1
Auralex Acoustics LENRD - Auralex Acoustics Roominator
Espo77 is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 06:11 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio View Post
I'm a KEF dealer and have been for nearly 10 years, so I have significant experience with the models you're asking about as well as their predecessors. The R series is a unique and beautiful product. Clients have said they get compliments and questions about them all the time and have been very very pleased.

Some notes regarding your questions...

- For theater duties in a 5.1 (or any multi-channel setup, really) there won't be a world of difference between the R7 & R5 until you get up into trying to do some higher volume listening (theater levels) or if you're in a upper medium to large room. For example: My room is 13'x25'x8' = 2,600 cubic feet - under THX Ultra2 spec - and I sit 13' & 17' away. Either speaker would do well, with the R7 being the "bigger', fuller sounding setup.

- For 2 channel music, the R7 will be the winner there. No question. The trick, though, will be placement. You will want the R7 set correctly for your room to get their best performance. If you will be constrained in space or having to stick these right up against a boundary or corner, I would recommend the smaller R5 as it will be easier to integrate into a space like that.

- I'm of a different opinion than the others here when it comes to the surrounds. Whenever budget allows voice matching or speakers of the same series is typically the ideal. You can get away with stepping down if you need, but here is why I usually recommend staying in series.

The reasons are numerous. In no particular order...

1: The R-Series has a distinct and beautiful look. Having those up front and then the Q series in the back won't be as aesthetically uniform and will look like a half measure.

2: Uniform Sound. Setting aside digital surround sound, lets look at another common sound format: Multi Channel Stereo. I listen to lots of content this way - some music, sporting evens, most TV shows. You can absolutely, positively tell a difference between speaker grades in this format as they are all playing at once.

^ As someone that enjoys a fair amount of content in all channel stereo, the above is important enough to me that, in my personal systems, everything is series or voice matched as close as possible. Especially since when my kid goes to bed I like to have a lower volume, but still want to hear everything as I walk around the house or move around. The difference in quality between front & back can be apparent in this sound mode.

3: Similar Capabilities. Having a system where the fronts are able to play larger volume levels without distortion or cabinet resonances is awesome... until the rears can't match them and become obvious weak points in the room. If matching the R series in the surrounds is out due to $, the others are good in the recommendation of stepping down to the Q series.

^ I would even look at the Q series in-wall speakers if that type of install's an option as they wouldn't be as visually different and relatively stealthy.

- On the receiver front, If yours seems a little weak (it just might) I'm a dealer of Denon, Marantz, Onkyo, Pioneer/Elite, Integra, and others. I tend to cherry pick for what the project needs, but my favorite receiver line is the Yamaha Aventage Line. The RX-A2080 would be an outstanding receiver for your room size and either of those speakers.

I'm going to have to try Onkyo's new RZ line just to see how I feel about it. There are aspects of those that look outstanding. I haven't ventured into the receiver thread to read opinions, and I probably won't. I like to try things without expectation.

- Regarding room correction: IMO, the benefits are WAY overblown and overstated. I've seen some incredible assertions where people hype up room correction as if it's some sort of crappy system or room fixing silver bullet. It's not. It can help, or it can hurt. We rarely use it on our projects as it can make a mess of things and be a waste of time. My hands are on a lot of receivers a year. They all have their plus & minus sides.

I would rarely, if ever recommend buying one receiver over another because of it's software. I think it's something to talk about, so guys bring it up like it's some saving grace, miracle potion for bad choices. If your room is acoustically bad, fix it in the physical realm first. If your speakers sound bad.... buy proper ones. Software isn't going to make bad speakers sound good, but if can make good speakers sound bad.

Buy your receiver based on DURABILITY, POWER, INPUTS, and then... somewhere down the line is software that you may or may not use. The forum is littered with, I would guess, a hundred threads praising or damning each manufacturer's auto-cal. The flavor of the month changes all the time. My professional opinion is to try it with out, try it with, and then choose one and mess with it to your liking.

Feel free to ask questions. I'm sure others will chime in with their experiences as well. Best of luck to you!
Point noted on the aesthetics. Do you know if the r100s would be visually a better match for r7s up front (it looks like they also come in black gloss)? The main constraint on my rears is size. The R3s are nice to look at, but in the middle of the room on stands they are just a bit too big and awkward.

I'm leaning towards the r7s up front as music is important to me. Unfortunately my local dealer can't let me listen to r5s side by side as he doesn't have any on hand.

Looking at the R7 specs, I see:

15w - 300w recommended
8 ohms (min 3.2 ohms)

Will any avr that outputs in that range suffice? What are the implications of the min impedance quoted?
Mick1234 is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 06:15 AM
Senior Member
 
Dargent0628's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 418
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 228 Post(s)
Liked: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mick1234 View Post
50:50 music : movies. I figure I will run just the front two speakers for music (I assume my receiver can do this).

Room is 5m x 7m, but tv area is 5m x 4m, so there will be a bit of space behind the rears. The center seat will be around 3.5m from the front speakers.

Thanks for the tip on the Audyssey; I will investigate.

Planned center speaker will probably be the R2c just to keep things consistent up front. Open to suggestions on subs.
I'm estimating your room as being somewhere around 3400^ ft, which would be considered "large" : https://www.audioholics.com/loudspea...ofer-room-size

I am not a bassaholic--I have two JBL 550P's which are sealed and very musical, but they would not do your room nor system justice. If you want to energize that space and really feel a visceral impact during action movies, etc...you are going to need subs with large drivers and deep extension. Again, others with far more knowledge and enthusiasm on the subject of subwoofers can chime in--there are countless threads regarding subs. Many ID companies offer free shipping , trial periods and no questions asked returns. I auditioned SVS and RSL before settling on the JBL 's.
Dargent0628 is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 06:58 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 437
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dargent0628 View Post
I'm estimating your room as being somewhere around 3400^ ft, which would be considered "large" : https://www.audioholics.com/loudspea...ofer-room-size

I am not a bassaholic--I have two JBL 550P's which are sealed and very musical, but they would not do your room nor system justice. If you want to energize that space and really feel a visceral impact during action movies, etc...you are going to need subs with large drivers and deep extension. Again, others with far more knowledge and enthusiasm on the subject of subwoofers can chime in--there are countless threads regarding subs. Many ID companies offer free shipping , trial periods and no questions asked returns. I auditioned SVS and RSL before settling on the JBL 's.
I (roughly) estimated his room to be 2,835^ and that is with 9' high ceilings. THX Ultra2 is, I believe 3,000^ for the smaller systems. For reference volume, the R5 would work for sure in his layout and room size when doing multi-channel theater duties. It's the 2 channel stuff where it won't be as full or impactful, falling short of the R7. It's not just the driver size, but the cabinet as well.

Subs are a different concern than his original question regarding the R series. But, yes, subs are critical to a theater system.
PrestigeAudio is offline  
post #11 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 07:20 AM
Senior Member
 
Dargent0628's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 418
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 228 Post(s)
Liked: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio View Post
I (roughly) estimated his room to be 2,835^ and that is with 9' high ceilings. THX Ultra2 is, I believe 3,000^ for the smaller systems. For reference volume, the R5 would work for sure in his layout and room size when doing multi-channel theater duties. It's the 2 channel stuff where it won't be as full or impactful, falling short of the R7. It's not just the driver size, but the cabinet as well.

Subs are a different concern than his original question regarding the R series. But, yes, subs are critical to a theater system.
Apologies, but your math is off. 5m=16.404ft/7m=22.96ft Assuming a 9ft ceiling height the OP's room will be 3389.723^

Maybe you are calculating the listening area? Unless the listening area is sealed, we must calculate the entire area, as that is what the subwoofer will energize.

Incidentally, the OP did mention he was open to subwoofer suggestions, so I broached this subject. With respect to driver size etc I was referring to subwoofers in a home theater usage scenario. As for two-channel, some will maintain that a subwoofer should still be in the chain and a suitable crossover employed. Others argue that "direct" and full-range are the only way to go. I say do whatever sounds good to the individual listener. My current speakers in the two - channel rig are Epi 500 's and for my ears and room no sub is needed!
Dargent0628 is offline  
post #12 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 08:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 437
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked: 198
[quote=Espo77;57538270]
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrestigeAudio View Post
I'm a KEF dealer and have been for nearly 10 years, so I have significant experience with the models you're asking about as well as their predecessors.


I'm going to have to try Onkyo's new RZ line just to see how I feel about it. There are aspects of those that look outstanding.
Curious as to what aspects of the RZ line look outstanding to you?


- Regarding room correction: IMO, the benefits are WAY overblown and overstated. We rarely use it on our projects as it can make a mess of things and be a waste of time.
...but you do use an SLP Meter don’t you?
...you want to volume/level match all channels correct?
...do you measure speaker distances to the seating area manually so that you can add the proper delay?
...what about EQ?
...do you use it to tame/reduce certain frequencies?

To answer your questions directly and then expand a little...

...but you do use an SLP Meter don’t you? YES

...you want to volume/level match all channels correct? SOMETIMES - Depends on the space, seating arrangement, and use of the system. A lot of multipurpose, open spaces - like a family room or open basement/media space where people are at the bar, walking around, kitchen, seating is all over, etc. - are not going to like level matched systems because it my be blasting certain people. Every individual space and client is different so it's important, IMO, to really understand the client, how they actually live, likes, dislikes, etc.

I don't reach out to people on the forum, but sometimes guys will PM me and ask for help obtaining their speakers, system design, gear, etc. I'm happy to hep them. I enjoy it! But, I always ask about their personal tastes in things like their families, use of the space, etc. It gets the absolute best results rather than just blindly saying "XYZ" is the correct thing to do.


...do you measure speaker distances to the seating area manually so that you can add the proper delay? YES

...what about EQ? YES, but I prefer to work inside the physical realm first. Proper sub-woofer PLACEMENT, for example is underrated and often overlooked as bass tends to be the hardest thing to get right in any room. Great speakers are supposed to be great. I don't want software designed to hit a generic, assumed result to start voicing them by taking away or adding things. A lot of times, these "fixes" cause more problems than they solve. As a professional, I would first address the physical room with proper placement and other acoustical considerations and then, as needed, electronically work within those constraints.

I also believe in selecting the correct speaker for the job/room/use. A lot of speakers are OVER-CAPABLE for the room, which can cause issues as well. The EQ then neuters said speakers. In which case... why waste the money for capability that isn't being used when the correct (maybe lower cost - maybe not) speaker wouldn't suffer from the same real world room constraints/effects?


...do you use it to tame/reduce certain frequencies? SOMETIMES. ^ Please see above.


I don't want to make the OP's thread about my system setups and derail it. I put my opinion on that subject into my response because the OP asked about receivers and, as has become incredibly popular on AVS threads, people started bringing receiver software into it. In doing/designing 100s (probably 4 figures, but I'll guess super low) of systems/homes and using nearly every receiver brand under the sun throughout a 19+ year career, I find the relatively basic room correction systems in receivers to be hit or miss (but great for marketing) while also having the potential to cause a lot of other issues beyond what they can fix.

As I pointed out, there are tremendous amounts of threads filed with love and hate for every receiver's calibration method. What should that tell you? That it is no silver bullet or reliable thing to base a decision on. They are very hit or miss on their results. There are many ways to bake a cake, so to speak. Correct system design, setup and PLACEMENT tends to be best when customized to the end user's exact needs where as the software in a receiver tends to be more generic.

The first few paragraphs or so are a bit redundant, but this recent article and related video done by Paul Hales from Pro Audio Technology https://www.cepro.com/article/paul_h...s_automated_eq

If anyone wants to discuss EQ stuff with me further, send me a PM so we can have back and forth dialogue or we can try and hop into one of the numerous related threads. Again, I do NOT want to derail the OP's questions any further.
PrestigeAudio is offline  
post #13 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 08:40 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 437
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dargent0628 View Post
Apologies, but your math is off. 5m=16.404ft/7m=22.96ft Assuming a 9ft ceiling height the OP's room will be 3389.723^

Maybe you are calculating the listening area? Unless the listening area is sealed, we must calculate the entire area, as that is what the subwoofer will energize.

Incidentally, the OP did mention he was open to subwoofer suggestions, so I broached this subject. With respect to driver size etc I was referring to subwoofers in a home theater usage scenario. As for two-channel, some will maintain that a subwoofer should still be in the chain and a suitable crossover employed. Others argue that "direct" and full-range are the only way to go. I say do whatever sounds good to the individual listener. My current speakers in the two - channel rig are Epi 500 's and for my ears and room no sub is needed!
No need for apologies, friend! I'm American and went by YARDS (3 feet) instead of meters as I didn't feel like doing the conversion. I mean, if he has 8' high ceilings, he's right in the middle between our guesses. lol! Thus, my (ROUGHLY) before stating the cubic volume. It's splitting hairs, really as we don't know the height of OP's ceiling and, based on his seating, he would still be perfectly fine with either speaker for multi-channel use.

Last edited by PrestigeAudio; 02-02-2019 at 09:04 AM.
PrestigeAudio is offline  
post #14 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 09:03 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 437
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mick1234 View Post
Point noted on the aesthetics. Do you know if the r100s would be visually a better match for r7s up front (it looks like they also come in black gloss)? The main constraint on my rears is size. The R3s are nice to look at, but in the middle of the room on stands they are just a bit too big and awkward.

I'm leaning towards the r7s up front as music is important to me. Unfortunately my local dealer can't let me listen to r5s side by side as he doesn't have any on hand.

Looking at the R7 specs, I see:

15w - 300w recommended
8 ohms (min 3.2 ohms)

Will any avr that outputs in that range suffice? What are the implications of the min impedance quoted?
YES on the R100 being a good match. Some notes on this...R7 (of R5) & R100 have, basically, the same finish on the cabinet. the Q series certainly does not. The newer R series, however, has muted black rings around the drivers instead of the shiny stainless rings on the previous iteration. So, the R100 has the "bling ring" around the drivers where the R7 & 5 is more understated.

My recommendation - If it were me : Knowing the placement challenges of the larger R7 & R11 I would do the R5 upfront with the matching R2C (also sporting all 5 1/4"s drivers like the R5) and LEAVE THE GRILLS OFF. Then do the R100s as surrounds and LEAVE THE GRILLS ON. This will make the rears more understated, yet have the same finish, while drawing the eye to the beautiful front 3 speakers. You would also gain the easier placement of the R5 along with it's smaller footprint as well as the matching 5 1/4" Uni-Q drivers all around.

Put the savings into your Subs & Amplification.

Regarding the receiver question: I would NOT under power the R series. Get the performance you paid for. A $300 receiver will not be sufficient to drive them. I would look at $1,000 models and up. The Yamaha 2080, the Denon X4500, Marantz SR6013 are all good choices for the system above with the 2080 being my choice. I haven't gotten my hands on it, but the Onkyo TX-RZ830 could be worth a look.

I used the Pioneer Elite SC-LX801 recently on a project https://www.pioneerelectronics.com/P...ivers/SC-LX801 and it was an OUTSTANDING product. Aesthetically, it won't match your KEF R series speakers at all. But, if your receiver will be in a cabinet, that won't matter. At $2,000, though, you're getting into the higher end of what you may have budgeted for.
PrestigeAudio is offline  
post #15 of 15 Old 02-02-2019, 08:32 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 1
The ceiling is 2.9 meters. The front left (to the left of the tv) is open into the dining area (see attachments).

Can you expand on the layout challenges of the R7s. Are there any guides online that cover this process?

Is the R400b sub decent for both music and movies? It is pretty important for the wife that things look alright and don't clash.

I think I'm getting close to pulling the trigger now
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	layout.png
Views:	27
Size:	5.3 KB
ID:	2519808  
Mick1234 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Speakers

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off