In-wall speakers for basement theater - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 61 Old 05-19-2020, 03:39 PM - Thread Starter
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In-wall speakers for basement theater

Hi all,

I posted a bunch of questions in another thread (Theater construction/design) but this is probably a better place for my specific questions.

I have a roughly 17'x30' basement space, and my theater will be on one half. It's got open areas on both ends as well so that will screw up the acoustics, but I can't fix that.
I have an Epson 4K projector and Silver Ticket 115" 2.35:1 acoustically transparent screen ordered.
Planning a 5.1 system, perhaps 5.1.2 in the future.
I definitely want to use In-Wall speakers for L/R/C because of the way the space will be used when we're not watching. Also, I have access to the unfinished area behind the wall. Subwoofer can be on the floor somewhere else.

Crutchfield has recommended Monitor Audio CP-WT240LCRs for all three. Another option could be CP-WT380IDC's for L/R.

I've read some suggestions about KEF, Triad, Revel for in-walls, but not much about Monitor. I do want speakers that I can purchase and install myself (not only through an installer). Partly because I've done this stuff a bit before, and partly because there aren't any pros within hours of me.

Along with this, I would appreciate input regarding good AV receivers that would work. I have a Yamaha Aventage A1080 in my family room system, and I have no complaints. I have also heard about the Denon X4500H as an option.
I also will be using a pair of outdoor speakers in another zone, so I would need enough channels for that. If people recommend different speakers that would require more power, that's where I could use input.

Lastly, I'd like to keep the price of receiver and LCR speakers to a total of about $3000 or so. I can add surrounds a little later as my budget allows.

Thanks very much for any thoughts!
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post #2 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 07:36 AM
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check out DIYsoundgroup.com . best bang-for-your-buck... and since you have access to the space behind, why not "mount" a regular speaker such that it looks like an in wall speaker. Most in wall speakers are designed to use the wall cavity as the box. the Denon 4500 is a great choice.

if you want something more finished, check out the in walls from axiom audio - they all feature an integrated back box.

good luck
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post #3 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 11:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, smithsabom,

I'll check out that site. Mounting regular speakers is an interesting idea I hadn't thought of. Unfortunately, behind that wall are storage shelves that would be very hard to move or modify. It'll be bad enough getting to the wall to run the wires.

I'm really hoping to find in-wall speaker recommendations that will provide good, full sound and not break the bank. Right now I don't have the budget for incredible, so I'm looking for "pretty damn good." I think that should be doable.

I actually had a friend of mine buy axiom speakers many years ago and he's been happy with them. I'll check them out too.
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post #4 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 12:07 PM
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Revel does a very good job with their in wall speakers. They all go through the same design process (measurements and listening tests) as all Revel speakers. The goal is neutral on and off axis response which most people prefer. It's good to have two subs to smooth out LF response in your room.

Last edited by Rex Anderson; 05-20-2020 at 12:48 PM.
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post #5 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psilva View Post
Hi all,

I posted a bunch of questions in another thread (Theater construction/design) but this is probably a better place for my specific questions.

I have a roughly 17'x30' basement space, and my theater will be on one half. It's got open areas on both ends as well so that will screw up the acoustics, but I can't fix that.
I have an Epson 4K projector and Silver Ticket 115" 2.35:1 acoustically transparent screen ordered.
Planning a 5.1 system, perhaps 5.1.2 in the future.
I definitely want to use In-Wall speakers for L/R/C because of the way the space will be used when we're not watching. Also, I have access to the unfinished area behind the wall. Subwoofer can be on the floor somewhere else.

Crutchfield has recommended Monitor Audio CP-WT240LCRs for all three. Another option could be CP-WT380IDC's for L/R.

I've read some suggestions about KEF, Triad, Revel for in-walls, but not much about Monitor. I do want speakers that I can purchase and install myself (not only through an installer). Partly because I've done this stuff a bit before, and partly because there aren't any pros within hours of me.

Along with this, I would appreciate input regarding good AV receivers that would work. I have a Yamaha Aventage A1080 in my family room system, and I have no complaints. I have also heard about the Denon X4500H as an option.
I also will be using a pair of outdoor speakers in another zone, so I would need enough channels for that. If people recommend different speakers that would require more power, that's where I could use input.

Lastly, I'd like to keep the price of receiver and LCR speakers to a total of about $3000 or so. I can add surrounds a little later as my budget allows.

Thanks very much for any thoughts!

How high are the ceilings?
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post #6 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 12:28 PM - Thread Starter
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How high are the ceilings?
EAS,
Ceilings are about 7' 9" but they're about 6" lower over a large section due to framed in air ducts.
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post #7 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 12:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Revel does a very good job with their in wall speakers. They all go through the same design and process (measurements and listening tests) as all Revel speakers. The goal is neutral on and off axis response which most people prefer. It's good to have two subs to smooth out LF response in your room.
Thanks, Rex,
I'll try to look into the Revels. Any advice on which I should look at for this size space? And do they need more than typical AVR power (e.g. 100W or so)?
Also, can they come with back boxes?
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post #8 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by psilva View Post
Thanks, Rex,
I'll try to look into the Revels. Any advice on which I should look at for this size space? And do they need more than typical AVR power (e.g. 100W or so)?
Also, can they come with back boxes?

Revel is very fair and consistent with their MSRP. Go for the biggest and best in your price range. 100W per speaker should drive them plenty loud if you are using subs.


You don't want back boxes, they limit the LF response. They are designed to be mounted in the wall without back boxes. The one in ceiling speaker that uses a back box is the C763L and it is the best in ceiling speaker to use because it is a 3 way design, it can handle lots of power and you can aim the tweeter at the listening position.
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post #9 of 61 Old 05-20-2020, 01:10 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, Rex. Yeah, from what I can see, the prices look very reasonable.
Regarding biggest and best.. I see the 553's and 583's have very different configurations and it's interesting that almost all the Revels just have one woofer and one tweeter (compared to many other brands with 3-5).

I was under the impression that I would need a back box because there's no drywall on the other side of the wall. I thought these in-wall speakers usually used that space as the "speaker box."
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post #10 of 61 Old 05-21-2020, 06:09 PM - Thread Starter
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From looking around and reading more, I'm still concerned about using in-wall speakers on an open-backed wall (no drywall) without some kind of enclosure/backer box.

Can anyone recommend good in-wall speakers with enclosures? Monitor Audio has some, and I guess Sonance as well.
I also found a site called b-sound that will make backer boxes for most in-wall speakers. Anybody have experience with them?

Thanks!
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post #11 of 61 Old 05-21-2020, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psilva View Post
From looking around and reading more, I'm still concerned about using in-wall speakers on an open-backed wall (no drywall) without some kind of enclosure/backer box.

Can anyone recommend good in-wall speakers with enclosures? Monitor Audio has some, and I guess Sonance as well.
I also found a site called b-sound that will make backer boxes for most in-wall speakers. Anybody have experience with them?

Thanks!
Back boxes are normally used to “attempt” to keep sound from the adjacent room.

There are a ton of in walls.

GoldenEar, Revel, JBL, Triad, RBH, James Loudspeaker, Klipsch, KEF and on an on...

What is your budget?

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post #12 of 61 Old 05-21-2020, 06:21 PM
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^^^^

My bad. I see $3K for AVR and LCR. If you could stretch $500 to $1000 it opens up your options.

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post #13 of 61 Old 05-21-2020, 06:35 PM - Thread Starter
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The budget isn't super fixed if I'm getting a system that I'll be happy with. As it is, I'm kinda planning to delay the surrounds partly to save money (short term) and also to give me time to figure out how to get wiring where it needs to go.

From what I've heard and read, the back boxes function to keep the sound/air contained in the same way that cabinet speakers do. For instance, you'd never see a panel of drivers and tweeters just standing up without a cabinet, right? I think the theory behind not needing one for in-walls is because the enclosed wall space is supposed to kind of function as a cabinet (although it's not really air sealed).

Am I incorrect on this? Local Revel dealer agreed in-walls without enclosures wouldn't sound good in an open-backed wall.

Thanks!
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post #14 of 61 Old 05-21-2020, 06:48 PM
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Speakers work best in the volume of space they are designed to be placed. The speakers you are considering are all good. When you have an open back in wall, it will have a different sound depending on the size of the cavity it is placed. Some of the better manufacturers will tell you what the ideal volume is for that model of speaker. Some manufacturers the best volume is their back box and other companies only have a back box option to reduce sound transmission to the adjacent room. I wouldn't mount regular speakers in the wall routinely. whenever you do that you will get a boost in the bass and lower mid-range output but not upper mid-range and highs. That will need to be compensated with EQ as it will sound boomy. You want a speaker that was designed to be placed in the wall, ideally one in its own enclosure or a back box designed to be the correct volume.
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post #15 of 61 Old 05-21-2020, 07:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, Ellebob,
I think that's what I was saying/thinking. In this case, there would literally be no "cavity" since the speakers would be attached to the drywall with literally nothing behind them.

So many speakers have clearly been "designed" to be in the wall, but most don't seem to have an enclosure or box.
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post #16 of 61 Old 05-22-2020, 04:47 AM
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So you are not wanting an in wall but rather surface mount then to the wall.

There has to be something behind the drywall.

Can you clarify?

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post #17 of 61 Old 05-22-2020, 05:32 AM
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I am picturing behind the wall is a storage area so the other side has never had drywall installed and you can see the studs. Some basements around here do that, people don't finish the whole basement and leave an area for storage. Makes wiring easy:-) It also makes adding a back box easy as many back boxes are not designed for retrofit applications. An in wall with its own enclosure or back box would be best. In general they are the best solution but they tend to cost more than open back in wall speakers.

An open back in wall in a typical wall cavity will have a certain sound. The designer can make some assumptions like maybe it will go in a 8 foot (common ceiling height) cavity with no insulation (many interior walls), because insulation takes up volume. Add insulation and the volume is reduced. Have a fire block in the wall or some other horizontal stud and the volume changes. In general the bigger cavity you put it in the more bass and lower midrange you will get from a speaker. This is great, free output but the crossover needs to be designed for it. As Rex stated the Revel's back box limits bass. It is unfortunate they did it that way and not try to make an accurate speaker with its back box. Because the Revel will sound different depending on the volume of cavity it is placed.

Many companies do this to make speakers to a price point. For instance Revel mentioned is a Harman company and Harman is perfectly aware of this. In one of Harman's other brands JBL Synthesis their in wall speakers are in their own enclosure for the best accuracy. But they are a different price point.

You do see box speakers with open backs but they are not common. They are called an open baffle or infinite baffle design. Often they are planar/ribbon type like martin Logan, Magnepan and sometimes with regular drivers like the older Jamo R-909 picture below. The difficulty with open back designs is sound comes out both sides of the speaker making it a bi-pole speaker. So that back wave coming from the drivers adds to the sound. It will be very room dependent on whether it sounds good. These open back speakers are also designed to be in the room.
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post #18 of 61 Old 05-22-2020, 06:30 AM - Thread Starter
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So you are not wanting an in wall but rather surface mount then to the wall.

There has to be something behind the drywall.

Can you clarify?
Yes, exactly as Ellebob said... Theater area is in finished basement, but behind that front wall is unfinished space with storage, furnace, etc.. As he said, it should make wiring a lot easier. Unfortunately, there's a very full 8-foot long wood shelf unit behind that wall, so it's going to be fun getting back there, especially if I need to try to install back boxes.
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I am picturing behind the wall is a storage area so the other side has never had drywall installed and you can see the studs. Some basements around here do that, people don't finish the whole basement and leave an area for storage. Makes wiring easy:-) It also makes adding a back box easy as many back boxes are not designed for retrofit applications. An in wall with its own enclosure or back box would be best. In general they are the best solution but they tend to cost more than open back in wall speakers.

An open back in wall in a typical wall cavity will have a certain sound. The designer can make some assumptions like maybe it will go in a 8 foot (common ceiling height) cavity with no insulation (many interior walls), because insulation takes up volume. Add insulation and the volume is reduced. Have a fire block in the wall or some other horizontal stud and the volume changes. In general the bigger cavity you put it in the more bass and lower midrange you will get from a speaker. This is great, free output but the crossover needs to be designed for it. As Rex stated the Revel's back box limits bass. It is unfortunate they did it that way and not try to make an accurate speaker with its back box. Because the Revel will sound different depending on the volume of cavity it is placed.

Many companies do this to make speakers to a price point. For instance Revel mentioned is a Harman company and Harman is perfectly aware of this. In one of Harman's other brands JBL Synthesis their in wall speakers are in their own enclosure for the best accuracy. But they are a different price point.

You do see box speakers with open backs but they are not common. They are called an open baffle or infinite baffle design. Often they are planar/ribbon type like martin Logan, Magnepan and sometimes with regular drivers like the older Jamo R-909 picture below. The difficulty with open back designs is sound comes out both sides of the speaker making it a bi-pole speaker. So that back wave coming from the drivers adds to the sound. It will be very room dependent on whether it sounds good. These open back speakers are also designed to be in the room.
Thanks. Yeah, the differences in sounds make sense. I had wondered why so many companies make open in-wall speakers when the walls they're being installed in can be so different.

I had thought of the planar ML speakers when I mentioned there aren't "open" cabinet speakers, but I figured those are a different animal altogether.

So, I guess we've concluded an in-wall speaker with an enclosure would be best and easiest. Any suggestions, especially considering I'm dealing with a 17x30' room (with additional areas coming off that space)? I don't think I need massive units, but I'm very concerned about undersizing and having a small theater sound. One rep had recommended Monitor Audio CP-WT240LCRs for L, C, and R. Nice price and they have an enclosure, but will they give a full enough sound for the space? I have no way to try them out, so it's frustrating.

I can also try to build (or purchase from b-sound) back boxes if people think that's the best way to achieve what I'm looking for.

Thanks again for all the input!
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post #20 of 61 Old 05-22-2020, 09:17 AM
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It depends on your seating and desired listening levels? 17'x30' is a good sized room but if you only sit 10 feet away it's not a problem. If your seating is 25 feet away and you like to listen loud then that is a whole different requirement.
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It depends on your seating and desired listening levels? 17'x30' is a good sized room but if you only sit 10 feet away it's not a problem. If your seating is 25 feet away and you like to listen loud then that is a whole different requirement.
Good point. Yeah the seating will probably only be about 12-14’ away from the screen.
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post #22 of 61 Old 05-22-2020, 01:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Oh sorry, that was only part of your question. I guess I’d like to be able to have something similar to theater sound. But not like rock concert loud.. Make sense? I have such a hard time telling how much quality sound can come from a given speaker.
Thanks.
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post #23 of 61 Old 05-23-2020, 04:26 AM
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Your next step is about room layout. Are you only having one row of seating or two? I like to use brands that offer a good number of solutions for various applications. for instance bi-pole surrounds are usually a better choice if having two rows or side seats are very close to the speakers otherwise 5 identical speakers is a perfect. Angled ceiling speakers possibly for Atmos again depending on rows and placement. Whenever possible I would try to match all my speakers or at least from the same series. The Monitor Audio suggested I think is too small for your application. Two 4" woofer in a speaker is not going to give enough output for 13-14 feet away for listening moderately loud. Two 6 inch would be better or at least 5 inch woofers. Once you get a room layout then look at what companies offer the models you need.
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Your next step is about room layout. Are you only having one row of seating or two? I like to use brands that offer a good number of solutions for various applications. for instance bi-pole surrounds are usually a better choice if having two rows or side seats are very close to the speakers otherwise 5 identical speakers is a perfect. Angled ceiling speakers possibly for Atmos again depending on rows and placement. Whenever possible I would try to match all my speakers or at least from the same series. The Monitor Audio suggested I think is too small for your application. Two 4" woofer in a speaker is not going to give enough output for 13-14 feet away for listening moderately loud. Two 6 inch would be better or at least 5 inch woofers. Once you get a room layout then look at what companies offer the models you need.
Ceiling is nearly 8 ft but about 40% of the right side is 14” lower due to duct work.
Only one row of seating, probably about 12 feet back. I’ll probably have to skip Atmos due to my weird ceiling.

Sounds like I was correct being concerned about 4” drivers in that space. A local shop has SpeakerCraft (which would need back boxes built) and Sonance which have enclosures. They have Revel available which also need boxes. Looks like the Sonance are out of my price range. SpeakerCraft Profile Aim Cinema Fives would probably run around $800 each. Unfortunately the local guy is more into car stereos than home theaters.
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post #25 of 61 Old 05-24-2020, 11:39 AM
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If looking for in-walls with backing boxes, Axiom Audio gets lot's of positive comments from this forum. I have in-walls (Polks) and I looked at several different brands within the $1,000-1,500 range for the front 3 and looked at the Axioms pretty closely.


https://www.axiomaudio.com/in-wall-speakers
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post #26 of 61 Old 05-24-2020, 12:24 PM
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Let me get this straight,

You have full access to the speaker behind the wall? If so, that would require a speaker specifically designed to be infinite baffle (IB) because it is not an enclosed space. Most inwall speakers have the rear wave coming out of the back of the speaker contained by the wall--no problems with the sound creeping around and creating phase issues with the front in phase portion of the sound. Now if you use the backer boxes to prevent that sounding blasting out of the back--and you have access to the speakers--realistically, you can use any typical box speaker.

OK, this is how I would do it. Say, just for fun I liked a speaker that was 18 inches tall, 9 inches wide and 10 inches deep. I'd cut out something like a 22" X 12" hole in the wall then mount a grill over it. You can purchase speaker grills seperately or build them with a piece of 1/2" plywood and stretch whaver acoustic cloth over it. Mount it with glue, a few finishing nails or magnets if you want to remove them on occasion. Go behind the wall and place a shelf at the bottom of the cut out and put whatever box speaker you like on that shelf firing through the grill. This will allow you to angle the box up/down/left or right to get the correct setup that works for your room. Once that is done, simply take denim insulation, pillow stuffins or whatever and place in around the edges of the speaker so it seals off the wall cutout to the speaker box. Get it flush with the wall then put the grill back on.

What happens when you do that with a regular box speaker? Well, it changes the bass response because the speaker baffle is not small allowing the bass to "wrap around" and go omni-directional at a certain point (called baffle step) so you'll see a rise in bass output below baffle steup or around 250 to 400Hz on down. Most stand alone speakers have the crossovers and tuning done to allow them to stand alone so use "baffle step correction". There are ways to remove that from the crossover but--now that you have room correction, just let it do it's job and trim down the increased bass when applicable.

Think of it as an "inverted bookshelf" that blows through the wall, not on the wall. Don't forget to put the insulation around the wall cut out to the speaker sides. If you like, it is rather easy to do by using old denim blue jeans and stuffing from an old pillow. Make long pillows that are wider/taller than the cut out and slide them in to seal it off. The pillow stuffins are inside the denim so a way to prevent them from looking weird/odd when viewed from the back. If you can't sew, you can make them with a hot glue gun, denim and pillow stuffins--just hide the seam. Hot glue gun makes wrapping the acoustic cloth around the 1/2" plywood frame quick so "acoustic pillows" can be quickly made at the same time.

I'm kinda a weird guy though, but if it was me that is exactly how I'd do it if I had access to the other side of the wall. There are companies that will print out pictures on acoustic cloth so your speaker grills can be movie posters, pictures of your dog or different patterns. Very common for basement theaters to use those printed acoustic cloths to make noise absorbers with Owens Corning panels which are framed with 1 X 4's and covered with the acoustic cloth "posters" to stealth them out.

Just another option, as long as you have room correction the increased bass response below baffle step can easily be sorted out and will be more efficient--nice bonus. In the future, it allows upgrades by simply swapping speakers instead of starting over. If you don't have or desire to use a jig saw and glue, there are companies that make acoustic grills in whatever size you desire--you can get frames custom made if you like. Don't let the fear of messing up making a grill remove that option--if you can cut a hole in the wall, you might as well cut some 3/8th ply, grill cloth and glue gun your own grill to match.

Good luck with whatever you decide and enjoy your new upgraded system.
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post #27 of 61 Old 05-24-2020, 06:13 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by 49erfaninkansas View Post
If looking for in-walls with backing boxes, Axiom Audio gets lot's of positive comments from this forum. I have in-walls (Polks) and I looked at several different brands within the $1,000-1,500 range for the front 3 and looked at the Axioms pretty closely.


https://www.axiomaudio.com/in-wall-speakers
Thanks. I just took a glance. The M5HPs are very reasonable for the size, but I can't tell if they have a back enclosure.
I actually recommended Axioms to a good friend of mine years ago, and he's been very happy with them.
Only issue might be that they do stick out from the wall a bit more than most in-walls (5/8"). I'll have to see if that will screw up the screen that will be in front of them.

Thanks for the recommendation!
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post #28 of 61 Old 05-24-2020, 06:18 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by 18Hurts View Post
Let me get this straight,

You have full access to the speaker behind the wall? If so, that would require a speaker specifically designed to be infinite baffle (IB) because it is not an enclosed space. Most inwall speakers have the rear wave coming out of the back of the speaker contained by the wall--no problems with the sound creeping around and creating phase issues with the front in phase portion of the sound. Now if you use the backer boxes to prevent that sounding blasting out of the back--and you have access to the speakers--realistically, you can use any typical box speaker.

OK, this is how I would do it. Say, just for fun I liked a speaker that was 18 inches tall, 9 inches wide and 10 inches deep. I'd cut out something like a 22" X 12" hole in the wall then mount a grill over it. You can purchase speaker grills seperately or build them with a piece of 1/2" plywood and stretch whaver acoustic cloth over it. Mount it with glue, a few finishing nails or magnets if you want to remove them on occasion. Go behind the wall and place a shelf at the bottom of the cut out and put whatever box speaker you like on that shelf firing through the grill. This will allow you to angle the box up/down/left or right to get the correct setup that works for your room. Once that is done, simply take denim insulation, pillow stuffins or whatever and place in around the edges of the speaker so it seals off the wall cutout to the speaker box. Get it flush with the wall then put the grill back on.

What happens when you do that with a regular box speaker? Well, it changes the bass response because the speaker baffle is not small allowing the bass to "wrap around" and go omni-directional at a certain point (called baffle step) so you'll see a rise in bass output below baffle steup or around 250 to 400Hz on down. Most stand alone speakers have the crossovers and tuning done to allow them to stand alone so use "baffle step correction". There are ways to remove that from the crossover but--now that you have room correction, just let it do it's job and trim down the increased bass when applicable.

Think of it as an "inverted bookshelf" that blows through the wall, not on the wall. Don't forget to put the insulation around the wall cut out to the speaker sides. If you like, it is rather easy to do by using old denim blue jeans and stuffing from an old pillow. Make long pillows that are wider/taller than the cut out and slide them in to seal it off. The pillow stuffins are inside the denim so a way to prevent them from looking weird/odd when viewed from the back. If you can't sew, you can make them with a hot glue gun, denim and pillow stuffins--just hide the seam. Hot glue gun makes wrapping the acoustic cloth around the 1/2" plywood frame quick so "acoustic pillows" can be quickly made at the same time.

I'm kinda a weird guy though, but if it was me that is exactly how I'd do it if I had access to the other side of the wall. There are companies that will print out pictures on acoustic cloth so your speaker grills can be movie posters, pictures of your dog or different patterns. Very common for basement theaters to use those printed acoustic cloths to make noise absorbers with Owens Corning panels which are framed with 1 X 4's and covered with the acoustic cloth "posters" to stealth them out.

Just another option, as long as you have room correction the increased bass response below baffle step can easily be sorted out and will be more efficient--nice bonus. In the future, it allows upgrades by simply swapping speakers instead of starting over. If you don't have or desire to use a jig saw and glue, there are companies that make acoustic grills in whatever size you desire--you can get frames custom made if you like. Don't let the fear of messing up making a grill remove that option--if you can cut a hole in the wall, you might as well cut some 3/8th ply, grill cloth and glue gun your own grill to match.

Good luck with whatever you decide and enjoy your new upgraded system.
Hi, 18,

Thanks for all the info. I think I actually mentioned way back that even though I have access to the open wall, it's got a big storage shelf which would prevent anything more than about 1" deeper than the wall. That's why I've been trying to find in-walls with enclosures. Otherwise, it would have been great to have good towers that are still hidden (and a bit cheaper for probably better sound).
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post #29 of 61 Old 05-27-2020, 08:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Just an update:

My local dealer can get me a pair of SpeakerCraft AIM Cinema Five's (for L and R) and I'd use an AIM LCR 5 for the center channel and probably the surrounds.

The Cinema Five's are only $500 each, the others $300. Those seem to be great prices for an authorized dealer.

Only down side is I'll need to build some back boxes, but I guess that's not terrible. The Sonance R2's look great and have an enclosure, but they'd probably be $1300 each.

It does concern me that there aren't many reviews on these speakers even though it's a well-established company.

Sound like a reasonable plan?
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post #30 of 61 Old 05-27-2020, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by psilva View Post
even though I have access to the open wall, it's got a big storage shelf which would prevent anything more than about 1" deeper than the wall. That's why I've been trying to find in-walls with enclosures. Otherwise, it would have been great to have good towers that are still hidden (and a bit cheaper for probably better sound).
Out of curiosity, exactly how deep is your wall? Perhaps there are some sealed cabinet or front ported speakers that are shallow enough to fit.

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