The official Dolby Atmos thread (home theater version) - Page 1293 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #38761 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Flinthead View Post
Hey guys... I finally finished my basement build. Marantz 7010 with Sony 40es and 7.2.4 setup. It's freaking awesome!!! Mad Max Fury Road was amazing in Atmos. I have one question from you guys, hopefully you have ran into this before. I purchased Game of Thrones S1, the steelbox version with Dolby Atmos, and when i play it and select "Dolby Atmos" as the audio it will only play as "Doly DTS + Dolby Surround". It still sounds good but shouldn't it show "Dolby Atmos" on the Marantz AVR like the Mad Max movie did??
Which player are you using?

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post #38762 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Flinthead View Post
Hey guys... I finally finished my basement build. Marantz 7010 with Sony 40es and 7.2.4 setup. It's freaking awesome!!! Mad Max Fury Road was amazing in Atmos. I have one question from you guys, hopefully you have ran into this before. I purchased Game of Thrones S1, the steelbox version with Dolby Atmos, and when i play it and select "Dolby Atmos" as the audio it will only play as "Doly DTS + Dolby Surround". It still sounds good but shouldn't it show "Dolby Atmos" on the Marantz AVR like the Mad Max movie did??
I'll bet anything it's the secondary audio setting on your BDP.
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post #38763 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 07:10 AM
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It's a Sony BDPS6500. I ran through all the settings on it, could have missed something??

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post #38764 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 07:20 AM
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Dolby Atmos recommends ceiling speakers because effectively, not theoretically that's not true. It's much easier and does not require special mixing to create an over head sound when the speaker is actually overhead. The wider the seam is between the speakers the less believable the sound is as it passes from one speaker to the next. To create an overhead sound it requires a mix between the front height and rear height to fool your ears into thinking its overhead. If you have an actual top height speaker on the ceiling the transition is audibly much shorter and more realistic. The distance between the speakers (the seam) is shorter so much closer to seamless.

Using height speakers only on the opposing walls is a set up of necessity because of room limitations. If your able to mount ceiling speakers it is always more desirable when it comes to Atmos.
This is one of the common misconceptions of those newer to Atmos. It's a misunderstanding of the geometry and the prevailing importance of ceiling height. There fundamentally is zero physical difference between a "top" and a "height" speaker. The speakers are one and the same in 99.9% of all home theaters. In rooms with tall ceilings, this may not be the case.

This so called "seam" that you've created is referring to the space between front and rear speakers it sounds like. Let's assume you have a 10' deep room with 8' tall ceilings, which is fairly close to a standard non-dedicated room. The front top/height speakers will be 56" in front of you and the rear top/height speakers will be 56" behind you if you shoot for 45° and 135° respectively....That equates to ~10' spread between front and rears, or the exact depth of the room. So the speakers could be in-ceiling at the wall/ceiling junction or they could be on the wall....Physically they are in the exact same location within just a few inches based on mounting method. Placing them further apart (or increasing the "seam") simply results in your speakers being at the edge or even outside of specifications. In this example if your room is deeper, it does not mean that you can just throw the speakers on the wall and call them FH/RH. Specs must still be maintained.

The thing you are not understanding is that the angles for tops and heights are essentially identical. This means that most rooms cannot accommodate all 5 pairs of top speakers. Even in my 16' deep room with 7.5-8.5' tall ceilings, each of the 5 pairs would only be separated by about 18" due to the ceiling height, the critical determining factor. I've even gone so far as to try to figure out how to install FH/RH pairs to maximize speaker count, and it's physically impossibly to place them in spec as they would be right on top of my TF/TR or require all pairs to be installed nearly touching each other or installed out of spec. Simply put, the angles are identical and therefore the spacing (or seam as you call it) between proposed heights and tops is identical. You may not believe this despite angle specifications being identical. Spend a few hours drawing and measuring everything in your room. Break out tape measures and create spreadsheets with arcsin, arctan, arccos formulas. Or even grab a laser angle finder. You can validate this in a multitude of ways, all of which I have done extensively for over a year.

Furthermore on the "seam"...Currently my top front and top rear speakers have about a 12' spread between them. I actually run my speakers to the extreme angles of spec to achieve the largest spacing between pairs. You seem to be indicating that this large "seam" is unfavorable. But this allows for a better distribution of TF, TM, TR and results in a much more spacious Atmos panning effect. It also helps to accommodate 2 row seating areas. This wide "seam" is actually a wonderful thing and results in extremely large sound stage. Imagine placing your FL and FR speaker right next to each other to minimize the "seam" and you will immediately comprehend this, as left-right panning will be extremely minimized and the stage extremely compressed. The majority of the sounds I hear are perfectly phantom imaged between the front and rear pairs (where my unconnected TM speakers are installed). Most people think they are on and being used, but for now they are just bare speaker wire hanging in the AV closet until 13 or 15 ch prepros exist. When installed correctly, this "seam" does not even exist. It's a seamless panning from the front to back of the room, and in between.

Now on the processing of the height vs top speaker layout, that's a completely different story. Nearly anyone can reassign their tops as heights and vice versa. Again this is due to the fact that the speakers have the same angle specifications. And within any given room the ceiling height is going to dictate where those speakers can be installed. 99% of the time, the speakers can be labeled as either/or. You will see that most people have done just this and have swapped between height/top designations due to the recent release of DTS:X; all without physically moving the speakers. Many of us prefer to use "top" amp assigns vs "height" amp assigns and think the processing sounds better. We all also realize that while the speakers are physically the same, the processing is different.

I can easily prove this to you with dimensions of your room. But at the end of the day, I'm telling you that this "seam" is non-existent and that height/top speakers are the same physical speaker in most every home theater. If you want to debate the processing, well that's another story that we can't even really dive into since we don't know HOW the processing is being affected in any great level of detail (since Dolby hasn't released that information).

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post #38765 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 07:31 AM
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I've finally ordered a Marantz 8802a to upgrade my home theater to Dolby Atmos/dts:X, so now that its time to seriously consider where to cut the holes for ceiling speakers, I want to confirm their location. I believe that from the MLP, the TF's should be located the same distance forward as the distance from your ears to the ceiling while seated, correct? And the TR's would be the same distance from the MLP, but in the other direction (towards the back of the room)? I've got two rows of seating, but I'm giving up on trying to make it work well for both seating locations as 90% of the time, I'm in the theater by myself, sitting in the MLP.


What about side to side? According to the Dolby diagram, it looks like they are supposed to line up directly with the FL and FR speakers away from the side walls. Is that correct? I have 6" deep soffits around the perimeter of the room that are about 2' wide. If I follow this direction, it places the ceiling speakers right up against the edge of the soffit. Is that a problem?


Boy, I have a lot of questions.
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post #38766 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Stoked21 View Post
This is one of the common misconceptions of those newer to Atmos. It's a misunderstanding of the geometry and the prevailing importance of ceiling height. There fundamentally is zero physical difference between a "top" and a "height" speaker. The speakers are one and the same in 99.9% of all home theaters. In rooms with tall ceilings, this may not be the case.

This so called "seam" that you've created is referring to the space between front and rear speakers it sounds like. Let's assume you have a 10' deep room with 8' tall ceilings, which is fairly close to a standard non-dedicated room. The front top/height speakers will be 56" in front of you and the rear top/height speakers will be 56" behind you if you shoot for 45° and 135° respectively....That equates to ~10' spread between front and rears, or the exact depth of the room. So the speakers could be in-ceiling at the wall/ceiling junction or they could be on the wall....Physically they are in the exact same location within just a few inches based on mounting method. Placing them further apart (or increasing the "seam") simply results in your speakers being at the edge or even outside of specifications. In this example if your room is deeper, it does not mean that you can just throw the speakers on the wall and call them FH/RH. Specs must still be maintained.

The thing you are not understanding is that the angles for tops and heights are essentially identical. This means that most rooms cannot accommodate all 5 pairs of top speakers. Even in my 16' deep room with 7.5-8.5' tall ceilings, each of the 5 pairs would only be separated by about 18" due to the ceiling height, the critical determining factor. I've even gone so far as to try to figure out how to install FH/RH pairs to maximize speaker count, and it's physically impossibly to place them in spec as they would be right on top of my TF/TR or require all pairs to be installed nearly touching each other or installed out of spec. Simply put, the angles are identical and therefore the spacing (or seam as you call it) between proposed heights and tops is identical. You may not believe this despite angle specifications being identical. Spend a few hours drawing and measuring everything in your room. Break out tape measures and create spreadsheets with arcsin, arctan, arccos formulas. Or even grab a laser angle finder. You can validate this in a multitude of ways, all of which I have done extensively for over a year.

Furthermore on the "seam"...Currently my top front and top rear speakers have about a 12' spread between them. I actually run my speakers to the extreme angles of spec to achieve the largest spacing between pairs. You seem to be indicating that this large "seam" is unfavorable. But this allows for a better distribution of TF, TM, TR and results in a much more spacious Atmos panning effect. It also helps to accommodate 2 row seating areas. This wide "seam" is actually a wonderful thing and results in extremely large sound stage. Imagine placing your FL and FR speaker right next to each other to minimize the "seam" and you will immediately comprehend this, as left-right panning will be extremely minimized and the stage extremely compressed. The majority of the sounds I hear are perfectly phantom imaged between the front and rear pairs (where my unconnected TM speakers are installed). Most people think they are on and being used, but for now they are just bare speaker wire hanging in the AV closet until 13 or 15 ch prepros exist. When installed correctly, this "seam" does not even exist. It's a seamless panning from the front to back of the room, and in between.

Now on the processing of the height vs top speaker layout, that's a completely different story. Nearly anyone can reassign their tops as heights and vice versa. Again this is due to the fact that the speakers have the same angle specifications. And within any given room the ceiling height is going to dictate where those speakers can be installed. 99% of the time, the speakers can be labeled as either/or. You will see that most people have done just this and have swapped between height/top designations due to the recent release of DTS:X; all without physically moving the speakers. Many of us prefer to use "top" amp assigns vs "height" amp assigns and think the processing sounds better. We all also realize that while the speakers are physically the same, the processing is different.

I can easily prove this to you with dimensions of your room. But at the end of the day, I'm telling you that this "seam" is non-existent and that height/top speakers are the same physical speaker in most every home theater. If you want to debate the processing, well that's another story that we can't even really dive into since we don't know HOW the processing is being affected in any great level of detail (since Dolby hasn't released that information).
I applaud your ability to take a simple concept of physics and turn it into something that sounds so complicated.

They basic fact is that if your room is 20' long and you have height speakers on the front and back wall they are simply 20' apart. In order to create an object that is moving overhead from one side to the other the effect has to be done completely by processing and fooling your ears into thinking there is actual sound coming from over head. ATMOS uses sound that is either coming from or bouncing off the ceiling. Other than the processing used to place the object overhead, the actual sound is coming from the general area it's moving through, not by tricking your ears that sound is coming from a place where there are no speakers.

All the formulas and angles are great if you want to play with numbers all day and over think simple concepts. The fact remains that if sound is suppose to be coming from point A, a speaker at or near point A is much more believable by the brain than if you take a combination of speakers at points B and C and use them to create the effect of sound coming from point A.

This is made clear in every Atmos write up and demonstration out there.

Of course, all of this is subject to your room dimensions and the limitations presented by your walls and ceiling but in the end the same goal remains, to come as close as possible to the Atmos design layout for speaker distribution.

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post #38767 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 07:56 AM
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I've finally ordered a Marantz 8802a to upgrade my home theater to Dolby Atmos/dts:X, so now that its time to seriously consider where to cut the holes for ceiling speakers, I want to confirm their location. I believe that from the MLP, the TF's should be located the same distance forward as the distance from your ears to the ceiling while seated, correct? And the TR's would be the same distance from the MLP, but in the other direction (towards the back of the room)? I've got two rows of seating, but I'm giving up on trying to make it work well for both seating locations as 90% of the time, I'm in the theater by myself, sitting in the MLP.


What about side to side? According to the Dolby diagram, it looks like they are supposed to line up directly with the FL and FR speakers away from the side walls. Is that correct? I have 6" deep soffits around the perimeter of the room that are about 2' wide. If I follow this direction, it places the ceiling speakers right up against the edge of the soffit. Is that a problem?


Boy, I have a lot of questions.
The first part seems correct but where are your front speakers positioned? Are they all the way in the corners of the wall?

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post #38768 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 08:30 AM
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Which player are you using?
It's a Sony BDPS6500. I ran through all the settings on it, could have missed something??

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post #38769 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 08:35 AM
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Which player are you using?
It's a Sony BDPS6500. I ran through all the settings on it, could have missed something??
On Sony BDP you need to ensure the BD Mix setting is off. That disables secondary audio.
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post #38770 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 08:37 AM
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On Sony BDP you need to ensure the BD Mix setting is off. That disables secondary audio.
Thanks! I'll give that a shot this evening!

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post #38771 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 08:44 AM
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The first part seems correct but where are your front speakers positioned? Are they all the way in the corners of the wall?

The front speakers sit behind a acoustically transparent screen, about two feet in from the side walls. There are 2'x2' floor to ceiling bass traps in each corner, also behind the screen, and the speakers sit alongside of them. I'm going to try to attach a picture of the front of the room, although you don't see the speakers as they are behind the screen.
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post #38772 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 08:59 AM
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I applaud your ability to take a simple concept of physics and turn it into something that sounds so complicated.
LOL....Is that an oxymoron? BTW, It's not physics, it's geometry.

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They basic fact is that if your room is 20' long and you have height speakers on the front and back wall they are simply 20' apart.
You're making my point here....If your room is 20' long and your MLP is in the center of the room....You can only mount speakers as FH on walls 1) at 45° if your ceiling are 13.5' tall or 2) at 30° if your ceilings are 9.5' tall. If your MLP is more towards the back of the room, you can only mount FH speakers as your ceilings slowly grow towards 20' high! So if you just slap them up on the wall in that scenario, then of course they'll sound bad cus they are out of spec. I don't know of anyone who has ceiling height greater than 10'. The average room is going to be 7-8' tall. This hypothetical 20' long room is likely going to mandate TOP/IC speakers due to it's limited ceiling height and long depth. It is a simple concept, but you are failing to grasp the Atmos geometry here.

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In order to create an object that is moving overhead from one side to the other the effect has to be done completely by processing and fooling your ears into thinking there is actual sound coming from over head. ATMOS uses sound that is either coming from or bouncing off the ceiling. Other than the processing used to place the object overhead, the actual sound is coming from the general area it's moving through, not by tricking your ears that sound is coming from a place where there are no speakers.
Again, you are missing the geometry here. There is no "fooling" here. A speaker mounted on a wall at 45° to MLP or mounted on the ceiling at 45° to MLP is still always 45° above your ears. You will not hear the difference if the processing applied is the same on both (there is the matter of being on or off axis and the dispersion). The speaker is always above the listener and the sound will always come from and be perceived as above the listener.....It's the same angle above you and the same distance from you, period. You are also thinking of sound as if it's a narrow, directional light beam, like shining a laser pointer. It's not.....

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All the formulas and angles are great if you want to play with numbers all day and over think simple concepts. The fact remains that if sound is suppose to be coming from point A, a speaker at or near point A is much more believable by the brain than if you take a combination of speakers at points B and C and use them to create the effect of sound coming from point A.
It's not a matter of overthinking simple concepts. It's a matter of grasping the basic concepts. The angle specifications are essentially identical and therefore the speakers will be in the same location. The length of the room, and installation preference, may determine whether they are on the wall or on the ceiling. If you are making a point that having a TM speaker is preferable to having phantom image between TF and TR, then I agree. This is part of the whole premise of having a center channel speaker for dialogue. Object rendering can also be more precise by having additional speakers. However, many of us who have great Atmos setups will tell you that the phantom image between TF/TR or FH/RH is phenomenal and nearly indiscernible from having a dedicated TM (though we all long for 6 up top for improved granularity and object positioning).

I'm just trying to help you clear up your Atmos misconceptions here.....You're right, you don't need to overthink it. But you do need to grasp the geometry as opposed to refuting the use of FH/RH. For all intents and purposes they can be identical, and audibly perceived identically, to TF/TR deployments.

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post #38773 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 09:42 AM
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I've finally ordered a Marantz 8802a to upgrade my home theater to Dolby Atmos/dts:X, so now that its time to seriously consider where to cut the holes for ceiling speakers, I want to confirm their location. I believe that from the MLP, the TF's should be located the same distance forward as the distance from your ears to the ceiling while seated, correct? And the TR's would be the same distance from the MLP, but in the other direction (towards the back of the room)? I've got two rows of seating, but I'm giving up on trying to make it work well for both seating locations as 90% of the time, I'm in the theater by myself, sitting in the MLP.

What about side to side? According to the Dolby diagram, it looks like they are supposed to line up directly with the FL and FR speakers away from the side walls. Is that correct? I have 6" deep soffits around the perimeter of the room that are about 2' wide. If I follow this direction, it places the ceiling speakers right up against the edge of the soffit. Is that a problem?

Boy, I have a lot of questions.
I would read this article by pro intaller Nyal Mellor (who also posts in these forums) about ceiling speaker placement and how that relates to dispersion for two rows: http://www.acousticfrontiers.com/dol...ling-speakers/

The bottom line is that, as you know, with only two pairs of overheads you can't make it perfect for both rows. So what you want to do is optimize for that MLP (which I assume is first row) while still accommodating the second row. I think most people have ended up doing what's recommended in this article -- one pair between the rows and one pair in front of the first row, which become Top Front + Top Rear as referenced from the front row MLP. If you are careful with considerations of angle and dispersion the rear row should still get a good experience (just like sitting in the back of a theater). The higher the ceiling is, the easier it is to cover both rows with more consistent SPL.

Note that with what I assume are elevated rear surrounds in a 2-row environment, the rear overhead speakers can "cheat" forward a bit to create more separation from the back surrounds. So those TR speakers may not be a full 45-60 degrees back, but maybe 20-30 degrees behind.

I take a more common sense view of things -- you are trying to enable front-to-back and side-to-side panning of stuff overhead, and also to "fill the gaps" in the dome of sound as things travel around the bed layer. A good rule of thumb is to have the rear overheads split the gap between the side and back surrounds, and the front overheads closing the gap between side surrounds and screen speakers.

In terms of side-to-side spacing of the overhead arrays, the Dolby home documents recommend lining them up with your L/R main channels but in the commercial cinema they are narrower than that (splitting the gap between L/R and C channels). Since you have a nice dedicated room with a big screen, you can cheat more towards the commercial spec. As above with elevated back surrounds impacting the spacing from rear overheads, the elevation of the side surrounds may dictate you place the overhead arrays a bit narrower to create that angular spacing. Again, the idea being to evenly cover the gaps front-to-back, and side-to-side.

I would also point out that it's not THAT sensitive so don't become overly precise. If the overheads end up 1ft narrower or 1ft forward of some theoretical "ideal" you probably won't hear a difference.

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post #38774 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 09:42 AM
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To create an overhead sound it requires a mix between the front height and rear height to fool your ears into thinking its overhead.
Sure, because Heights and Tops have different rendering assumptions. Heights are assumed to be farther out or lower in elevation (whichever way you want to think about it). This is consistent across both formats.

If you set your overhead speakers to Heights and play the Atmos test tones, they will phantom image inward to give the impression of Tops. If you set the overheads to Tops and play the DTS:X channel checks, they will phantom image downward to give the impression of Heights.
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If you have an actual top height speaker on the ceiling the transition is audibly much shorter and more realistic. The distance between the speakers (the seam) is shorter so much closer to seamless.
Agreed, but that's true for any pair of speakers: the closer they are to each other, the more seamless the imaging and soundstage between them.

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post #38775 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by korkster View Post
The front speakers sit behind a acoustically transparent screen, about two feet in from the side walls. [...] I'm going to try to attach a picture of the front of the room, although you don't see the speakers as they are behind the screen.
This is very high on my wish list. To have all 'bed' speakers on the same height all around. Looks awesome too.
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post #38776 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 09:57 AM
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Tx-nr646/ps3

Posted this in the blu-ray player section, but maybe it belongs here...


I'm hoping to get some help on settings to pass un-decoded audio to my AVR from a PS3. I'm not seeing Dolby Atmos options on my AVR when watching an Atmos recorded movie such as Fury Road.

Here are my PS3 options:
1. BD/DVD Cinema Conversion - Automatic
2. BD/DVD Upscaler - Normal
3. BD/DVD video output format (HDMI) - Automatic
4. 1080p 24hz output (HDMI) - Automatic
5. BD/DVD dynamic range control - Automatic
6. BD/DVD audio output format (HDMI) - bitstream
7. BD - audio output format (optical digital) - bitstream direct

Here are my connections:
1. HDMI from PS3 to BD/DVD port on AVR
2. HDMI from TV to Main Out on AVR
3. HDMI from Fios box to TV
4. optical audio cable from Fios box to AVR.


Anyone have suggestions? I can't figure out what the heck I'm doing wrong.

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post #38777 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwoy View Post
Posted this in the blu-ray player section, but maybe it belongs here...


I'm hoping to get some help on settings to pass un-decoded audio to my AVR from a PS3. I'm not seeing Dolby Atmos options on my AVR when watching an Atmos recorded movie such as Fury Road.
Anyone have suggestions? I can't figure out what the heck I'm doing wrong.
Fat or slim?

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post #38778 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurraybhm View Post
Fat or slim?

Fattie version.

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post #38779 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwoy View Post
Fattie version.
That's the problem -- no bitstream of HD audio on the fat PS3.

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post #38780 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post
That's the problem -- no bitstream of HD audio on the fat PS3.

Oh **** - how did I not know this! Guess it's time for a Slim or PS4. Damn.

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post #38781 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 11:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post
I would read this article by pro intaller Nyal Mellor (who also posts in these forums) about ceiling speaker placement and how that relates to dispersion for two rows: http://www.acousticfrontiers.com/dol...ling-speakers/

The bottom line is that, as you know, with only two pairs of overheads you can't make it perfect for both rows. So what you want to do is optimize for that MLP (which I assume is first row) while still accommodating the second row. I think most people have ended up doing what's recommended in this article -- one pair between the rows and one pair in front of the first row, which become Top Front + Top Rear as referenced from the front row MLP. If you are careful with considerations of angle and dispersion the rear row should still get a good experience (just like sitting in the back of a theater). The higher the ceiling is, the easier it is to cover both rows with more consistent SPL.

Note that with what I assume are elevated rear surrounds in a 2-row environment, the rear overhead speakers can "cheat" forward a bit to create more separation from the back surrounds. So those TR speakers may not be a full 45-60 degrees back, but maybe 20-30 degrees behind.

I take a more common sense view of things -- you are trying to enable front-to-back and side-to-side panning of stuff overhead, and also to "fill the gaps" in the dome of sound as things travel around the bed layer. A good rule of thumb is to have the rear overheads split the gap between the side and back surrounds, and the front overheads closing the gap between side surrounds and screen speakers.

In terms of side-to-side spacing of the overhead arrays, the Dolby home documents recommend lining them up with your L/R main channels but in the commercial cinema they are narrower than that (splitting the gap between L/R and C channels). Since you have a nice dedicated room with a big screen, you can cheat more towards the commercial spec. As above with elevated back surrounds impacting the spacing from rear overheads, the elevation of the side surrounds may dictate you place the overhead arrays a bit narrower to create that angular spacing. Again, the idea being to evenly cover the gaps front-to-back, and side-to-side.

I would also point out that it's not THAT sensitive so don't become overly precise. If the overheads end up 1ft narrower or 1ft forward of some theoretical "ideal" you probably won't hear a difference.

Thanks, very much for your thoughts, and the link to the Mellor article. My biggest drawback is that my ceiling is only 7'2", that puts my second row pretty close to the ceiling. So I have a bit of a challenge, but I'm confident we can make it work, at least for the front row.
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post #38782 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprins View Post
This is very high on my wish list. To have all 'bed' speakers on the same height all around. Looks awesome too.
Thanks. It is nice having the bed speakers at similar height, but the big advantage to having the speakers behind the screen, is that all three front speakers, l/c/r, are identical, full range, tower speakers (Axiom M-80 v3's).
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post #38783 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwoy View Post
Oh **** - how did I not know this! Guess it's time for a Slim or PS4. Damn.
Get a PS4 and keep the fatty for PS3 compatibility. Just a thought.
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post #38784 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 11:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprins View Post
Get a PS4 and keep the fatty for PS3 compatibility. Just a thought.

Definitely keeping the fatty. Debating between PS4 and a dedicated player like a Panny DMP-BDT460 or something along those lines. I won't do any gaming on the PS4... I'll stick with the PS3 for those needs.

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post #38785 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwoy View Post
Definitely keeping the fatty. Debating between PS4 and a dedicated player like a Panny DMP-BDT460 or something along those lines. I won't do any gaming on the PS4... I'll stick with the PS3 for those needs.
Don't Get a PS4 just for Bluray playback!

I have a PS3 Fatty too, then picked up a Sony BDP-S5100 Bluray player for under $150 almost 3 years ago
Just so I could Bit Stream my Audio for DTS-MA and Dolby TrueHD.

Last November I finally caved in ( Black Friday) and bought a PS4, tried it a few times for Bluray but went back to the old S5100
...using the PS4 game controller sucks as a remote and the darn bright blue light never shuts off.

I then bought the PS4 universal remote (because the one I had for the PS3 doesn't work on the PS4 )
...and its a total turd too, half the size and weight of the PS3 version (for 2x the price) it shuts down on its own and loses connection within about 10 minutes.

To get it re-synced to the PS4 you have to hit the PS button and wait several seconds before you can pause your movie.

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post #38786 of 54916 Old 03-08-2016, 01:46 PM
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Wondering if anyone with a 7.1.4 setup with front-wides instead of rear surrounds (7w.1.4) has come across any particularly good Atmos demo material for showcasing front-wides. This review indicates Minions is a good choice:
(http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...-minions/28222)
"While height objects are generally reserved for a few key sequences, this Dolby Atmos mix takes special care in panning all the Minion character voices -- particularly Kevin, Stuart, and Bob -- as they run on and off screen, from right to left or left to right. Outside of 2.0 stereo mixes, I don't think we've ever heard a sound design that so heavily relied on front L and front R placement, which expands even further with the addition of front wide speakers."
Wondering if folks here concur, and if there are other movies folks would recommend.

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post #38787 of 54916 Old 03-09-2016, 03:53 AM
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Has anyone seen "In the Heart of the Sea" on Bluray? How was the atmos effect ?

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post #38788 of 54916 Old 03-09-2016, 04:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by shyyour View Post
Has anyone seen "In the Heart of the Sea" on Bluray? How was the atmos effect ?
watched it last night....outstanding ATMOS in this one
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post #38789 of 54916 Old 03-09-2016, 05:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
Wondering if anyone with a 7.1.4 setup with front-wides instead of rear surrounds (7w.1.4) has come across any particularly good Atmos demo material for showcasing front-wides. This review indicates Minions is a good choice:
(http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...-minions/28222)
"While height objects are generally reserved for a few key sequences, this Dolby Atmos mix takes special care in panning all the Minion character voices -- particularly Kevin, Stuart, and Bob -- as they run on and off screen, from right to left or left to right. Outside of 2.0 stereo mixes, I don't think we've ever heard a sound design that so heavily relied on front L and front R placement, which expands even further with the addition of front wide speakers."
Wondering if folks here concur, and if there are other movies folks would recommend.
I have front wides but in a 9.1.2 Atmos configuration. It's all personal preference and dependent on your room and ability to mount ceiling speakers. Most folks on this thread go with a 7.1.4 or x.x.4 Atmos setup.

I find the front wides fill in a gap that sound great with Atmos soundtracks. The wind whipping around in Everest is a good example. I do not have DTS X so anything that isn't an Atmos track (mostly everything from movies to cable) is listened to in DTS Neo X where all 11 speakers are active. (Cinema Mode - clarity of dialog and emphasis on the center channel.)
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post #38790 of 54916 Old 03-09-2016, 05:07 AM
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The openning scene of Spectre with the helicopter was good for panning on my traditional 7.1 with my Yamaha 3050.

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