"Official" Audyssey thread Part II - Page 188 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #5611 of 6880 Old 11-29-2018, 02:54 PM
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Is there any way to make XT32 not roll the high end off when set to Reference on my Denon AVR-X4400H? I love everything about it except that the speakers sound like they have a blanket over them. Should I just not use Audessy past distance and level setting, and set my own EQ's?

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post #5612 of 6880 Old 11-29-2018, 03:31 PM
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post #5613 of 6880 Old 11-29-2018, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travisx2112 View Post
Is there any way to make XT32 not roll the high end off when set to Reference on my Denon AVR-X4400H? I love everything about it except that the speakers sound like they have a blanket over them. Should I just not use Audyssey past distance and level setting, and set my own EQ's?

I assume you still want to use the "midrange compensation" (a 2 dB dip at about 2K) feature of Reference. Otherwise, if you don't like the high end roll off, there would be no reason to use Reference at all.


I find that most CDs and SACDs, and almost all movies, sound better with Audyssey Flat (rather than Reference). For the few that don't, I switch over to Reference. I don't experience the "blanket over the speaker" effect when using Reference with ~~ 90% of the over bright recordings that require me to use Reference.



It is unlikely that setting your own EQ (other than the subwoofer boost, set AFTER running Audyssey, that almost everyone uses) would do as good a job as Audyssey because Audyssey uses many thousands of correction points, and you would be stuck with just your 30 or so equalizer points or your tone controls, etc.


See: "Audyssey FAQ Linked Here" and
Guide to Subwoofer Calibration and Bass Preferences

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post #5614 of 6880 Old 11-29-2018, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan P View Post
If you are mostly HT, you want to measure CC+subs. Mostly music, L or R+subs (not L+R+subs). Did you see my instructions that were linked to earlier?

I tweaked my sub distance setting in the AVR a bit. Audy set it to 11 ft, and I changed it to 16 to get the graph below. Actual physical distance is only about 9 ft. It seems to have improved the bass dip a little, and this is with the phase dial at zero (how I ran the Audy cal). I think I'm happy with this Also, I decided to change my XO point for my mains to 60 Hz since they are fairly large towers.
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post #5615 of 6880 Old 11-29-2018, 10:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travisx2112 View Post
Is there any way to make XT32 not roll the high end off when set to Reference on my Denon AVR-X4400H? I love everything about it except that the speakers sound like they have a blanket over them. Should I just not use Audessy past distance and level setting, and set my own EQ's?
Get the app, and cut off at 500 Hz, worth the $20 to experiment and see if that works for you. Also, you can use the app to bring the curve back up, although at least in my experience, that takes some patience sometimes.
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post #5616 of 6880 Old 11-29-2018, 11:36 PM
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why do people like audyssey Reference over Flat setting?

after a bunch of tweaking setup and using Room EQ Wizard I was really surprised on the reduction of treble using audyssey (reference) vs. audyssey (flat). in my system at 6k the treble just drops drastically...why is this liked? below graph has what it looks like in my system with fronts crossed over at 80hz with subs...left and right.


I guess I just didnt realize the roll off....as I used audyssey for last year or so...
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post #5617 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 12:48 AM
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Reference is better for most people, since without the roll-off the treble can sound aggravatingly tinny due to the reflective nature of the average listening room. If your room is well treated or you listen near-field, then Flat is a better option.
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post #5618 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 01:37 AM
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yes, it depends on your room and the speakers (and your taste for sound of course).
if your living room has the acoustic similar to a natatorium and speakers with a very wide spread tweeter it sounds awful anyway, but some people try to fight the effect instead of the root cause by reducing treble.
in a room "suitable for music listening" the flat setting should be the better choice.
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post #5619 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 02:24 AM
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I guess naming of system as reference is just confusing...https://audyssey.zendesk.com/hc/en-u...-Target-Curves


even if just for movies and the people who spend tens of thousands+ on dedicated theater rooms would really want to use the reference mode still? just trying to wrap my head around the advantage of this target curve for movies. I guess its just an option for using less treble...maybe they should offer -3, -6, -9 db modes. and maybe they should state at what freq its suppose to start at...is around 6k the right freq it should start going down I wonder...

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post #5620 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 02:25 AM
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Because high frequencies are much more directional then low frequencies and the reference EQ helps to balance that out. Also, most rooms where these receivers are setup (average customer) have a lot of highly reflective surfaces which of course will encourage a very bright sound. Reference EQ will certainly help in those situations.

Flat EQ may work better in small highly treated rooms or dedicated home theater spaces that are properly treated and of course there is personal preference which will dictate the final decision
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post #5621 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 06:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travisx2112 View Post
Is there any way to make XT32 not roll the high end off when set to Reference on my Denon AVR-X4400H? I love everything about it except that the speakers sound like they have a blanket over them. Should I just not use Audessy past distance and level setting, and set my own EQ's?
Why not use "Flat" instead of "Reference?"

Kal Rubinson

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Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile
http://www.stereophile.com/category/music-round

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post #5622 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 07:43 AM
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I actually had been calibrating my room wrong this whole time. Last night, I read a thread here about only using the amount of positions you'd need, instead of just all of them, and everyone in that thread basically said "No, use all of them."



I had been only calibrating from two positions (both beside eachother on the couch) instead of the 8 I should have been. I did 8 calibrations last night from various positions, and everything sounds much better! (And I feel like a dope, but that's another story )
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post #5623 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 09:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travisx2112 View Post
I actually had been calibrating my room wrong this whole time. Last night, I read a thread here about only using the amount of positions you'd need, instead of just all of them, and everyone in that thread basically said "No, use all of them."



I had been only calibrating from two positions (both beside eachother on the couch) instead of the 8 I should have been. I did 8 calibrations last night from various positions, and everything sounds much better! (And I feel like a dope, but that's another story )
Definitely use all the measuring points. You are just giving Audyssey more data to work with. WRT to the actual positions, I think the jury is a little divided. I personally go with the tight grouping concept, but rather, I swing my boom mic stand in an "arc" between mine and my wife's seat. Some folks just measure a very tight spot at the MLP. For some reason, I always feel like I'd be cheating my wife if I did that...LOL. (She would not know nor care if there was a difference however).

Measuring positions throughout the room, far apart, is, IMO, just having Audyssey compromise more. So I avoid that. While I want to give Audyssey as much data as I can to calculate corrections, I do not want to "drag down" the final result by introducing too many locations with very poor responses (at those questionable locations). Put another way, do you want 1-2 seats to sound "great", or do you want the entire room to sound "good"?
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post #5624 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Overrid3 View Post
I tweaked my sub distance setting in the AVR a bit. Audy set it to 11 ft, and I changed it to 16 to get the graph below. Actual physical distance is only about 9 ft. It seems to have improved the bass dip a little, and this is with the phase dial at zero (how I ran the Audy cal). I think I'm happy with this Also, I decided to change my XO point for my mains to 60 Hz since they are fairly large towers.
A little? You gained from 1-4dB from 35-120hz...pretty significant in my book.

Did you go beyond 16', and if so, did the response get worse after that?
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post #5625 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Alan P View Post
A little? You gained from 1-4dB from 35-120hz...pretty significant in my book.

Did you go beyond 16', and if so, did the response get worse after that?

Maybe more than a little...a nice amount I believe I tried 18 ft, but didn't see much of change, so figured I'd just stay put. Not sure how much I should've changed the dist. without getting ridiculous. I don't know offhand what the wavelength is for those bass notes, but I wonder what a 5' change equates to in phase?



Anyway, music is sounding good. Bass is smooth, and I don't have to boost the sub as much. I think part of the problem before was, I was boosting the sub a lot to try to fill in that 80 Hz area, but it didn't help. It would just increase the freqs. below that. I think maybe that's why DEQ sounded a little overblown, too.


Now, I raised the sub only 3 dB, and I raised the bass on the tone controls by a few dB, and the low end sounds nice.
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post #5626 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by torii View Post
after a bunch of tweaking setup and using Room EQ Wizard I was really surprised on the reduction of treble using audyssey (reference) vs. audyssey (flat). in my system at 6k the treble just drops drastically...why is this liked? below graph has what it looks like in my system with fronts crossed over at 80hz with subs...left and right.


I guess I just didn't realize the roll off....as I used audyssey for last year or so...
The "official" line is that it depends on the listening room and seating position. For a "typical" room in a home, Audyssey Reference is supposed to be a small room (as opposed to a commercial theater) version of the roll-off used in commercial cinemas, plus some "midrange compensation," i.e., a dip of about 2 dB somewhere around 2K Hz. Audyssey Reference's high frequency rolloff starts at about 7 or 8 K, reaching -2dB at 10K Hz, and -6 dB at 20K Hz. Audyssey says that for very close seating in a heavily treated room, Audyssey Flat might be more appropriate.

I much prefer Audyssey Flat with my speakers, with most music and movies, in my room (4,257 cu. ft., moderately treated with absorption and diffusion). Some music recordings (particularly from the early days of CDs) are less harsh with Audyssey Reference. A very few movies from the magnetic era (mostly 1953 to about 1992) have some distortion in the top octave (10K Hz to 20K Hz); the Audyssey Reference roll-off can mask some this. The improvement is considerable in some cases. The horrible mono optical soundtracks of 1927 to the 1990s (overlapping with the superior magnetic tracks) are sometimes beyond help, but I try everything of which I can think (thanks, Winston).
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post #5627 of 6880 Old 11-30-2018, 02:51 PM
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I swing my boom mic stand in an "arc" between mine and my wife's seat.

Hi legierk, I think we need to get down to a bit of discussion on some theoretical stuff on concepts (or mis-concepts) on what Audyssey's MultEQ room correction software (or any other similar software) does and does not.

First and most important thing is that Audyssey does not do 3D rendering. No mic position is tagged with locational metadata. In this regard please think of MultEQ as a semi-automatic motor that needs a lot of user interaction. There are guidelines for MultEQ setup emphasizing mic placement patterns, yet, that doesn't mean you can place mic at MLP first, then with a long enough cable measure the second position in the kitchen, third in the bathroom, etc. Sounds quite silly, doesn't it? Well, same goes for placing most of mic positions for myself at MLP and one for the wife next to me on the left side!

Basically MultEQ will work best (as intended by the authors) when the seating area is measured with 6-8 positions practically 2 feet apart from each other. This is the way MultEQ creates an optimum frequency response curve around the seating area usually referred to as an "acoustic bubble". You and your wife will enjoy the (nearly) same acoustic experience regardless of where you are sitting.

Hope this helps!
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post #5628 of 6880 Old 12-01-2018, 10:32 AM
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I am having some trouble with the App and my 4400 AVR. I have used the app many times before. It was a little glitchy at times but it atleast worked.

I added a new sub and moved some stuff around so I wanted to run Audessey. The app detects my AVR on the network. Connects to it. If I have it set to 2 subs. It always hangs the app at the 2nd sub then eventually I get a "no network connection" message. If I set it to 1 sub, I get through the sub section. Then it goes to detect the Left Front speaker, it sits there and I get the "no network connection" message.

I have tried the AVR wireless and wired with no luck. I prioritized the AVR as the highest priority as well. This has worked before. Not sure if there was an update to the app that caused this or something I can try on my network?
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post #5629 of 6880 Old 12-02-2018, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Alan P View Post
A little? You gained from 1-4dB from 35-120hz...pretty significant in my book.

Did you go beyond 16', and if so, did the response get worse after that?

So I just wanted to report back on this. Any doubts I had about my UMIK1 not providing correct info are gone. According to my measurements, there was that bass dip around 90 Hz, so I loaded up a test tone at that freq. and did some listening. At the Audyssey's default placement for my sub (11 ft), I could hear the tone, but barely. I thought maybe I blew out my sub or something That's how quiet it was. Then, I switched to my tweaked distance of 16 ft, and BAM, there was the bass. It's hard to judge, but it was probably at least 3x louder.


I guess the moral of the story is, Audyssey isn't just set it and forget it. I've done plenty of tweaks after the cal, including raising the XO on the mains, boosting the sub a little, making sure all speakers were set to small, etc. I thought I was done, but then I gotta go and start taking measurements with REW, lol. Anyway, this sub-distance tweak really works.


Also, what do you all think of midrange comp? I tried turning it off on my system, and I have to say, it sounded pretty awful. There was a definite harshness to music that made it very unpleasurable (is that a word) to listen to. In my room and with my speakers, I really think the "BBC dip" is the way to go.
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post #5630 of 6880 Old 12-02-2018, 09:46 PM
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Hi guys, looking for some advice for mic placement for a Marantz NR-1606 with the 6 position version of audyssey. I'm going to be giving it to my parents and I plan on dragging my boom stand over and helping them run it when we set it up. Their "primary position" is two recliners with a small end table between them. I "think" it would be around 2' between the center of the table and the seating position in each chair but I'm thinking putting the mic over a wood table for the first measurement is probably a bad idea. Also my Mom wears hearing aids and generally ends up just using captions so I figured I'd make my Dad's chair the PLP and just take the six measurements around that. Any thoughts though? Or should I just go ahead and put the primary over the table and spread the rest around in that 2' bubble around it expecting audyssey will throw out any strange readings from that first point vs the others due to any reflections off the table?

edit: In case it helps, I found a picture from Christmas a few years ago that shows what I'm talking about. Ignore the chairs on the right side of the photo those aren't usually there. The chair that would be the PLP would be the one in the back right of the photo.
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post #5631 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 10:14 AM
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^^^

I would do the first mic position in Dad's chair and cluster the rest within 12"-18" of the first. With Mom wearing hearing aids, any benefit you would get with a wider pattern would most likely be wasted on her and end up compromising Dad's chair.

Also, I want to go the Christmas at your house. Holy Cow, look at all those presents!!
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post #5632 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Alan P View Post
^^^



I would do the first mic position in Dad's chair and cluster the rest within 12"-18" of the first. With Mom wearing hearing aids, any benefit you would get with a wider pattern would most likely be wasted on her and end up compromising Dad's chair.



Also, I want to go the Christmas at your house. Holy Cow, look at all those presents!!


Thanks for the info I'll do that.

Lol yeah some of that is my sister and brother in law bring their stuff for each other up with them. Otherwise it's parents still going overboard and six people buying stuff for each other.


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post #5633 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Overrid3 View Post

Also, what do you all think of midrange comp? I tried turning it off on my system, and I have to say, it sounded pretty awful. There was a definite harshness to music that made it very unpleasurable (is that a word) to listen to. In my room and with my speakers, I really think the "BBC dip" is the way to go.
No simple answer. It probably works better with some speakers than others and how well it works may depend on whether the speaker has a crossover between drivers in the range covered by the dip or not.

It may also depend on the listener. The midrange compensation dip is in the area where noise related hearing loss first becomes apparent and one of the first signs that people get of noise related hearing loss is difficulty in understanding speech because the loss first starts to appear in a frequency region important to voices. If someone has mild noise related hearing loss it's possible that the mid-range compensation dip could make the difference between them being able to understand dialog easily (turning the dip off) and not understanding dialog easily (having the dip on).

Like pretty much everything with Audyssey, there's no single universal answer that will suit everyone to your question.
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post #5634 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Overrid3 View Post
S

Also, what do you all think of midrange comp? I tried turning it off on my system, and I have to say, it sounded pretty awful. There was a definite harshness to music that made it very unpleasurable (is that a word) to listen to. In my room and with my speakers, I really think the "BBC dip" is the way to go.
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No simple answer. It probably works better with some speakers than others and how well it works may depend on whether the speaker has a crossover between drivers in the range covered by the dip or not.
.

I think the original purpose of Audyssey's midrange compensation was to lessen the ill effects of a crossover near 2K, or so, where the ear is very sensitive, BUT Chris K. said that he never heard a speaker that didn't sound better with the dip engaged.



My speakers are 3-way, and don't have a crossover anywhere near 2K. If a recording seems to be "good," as are most Blu-rays, SACDs, and a somewhat lower number of CDs, I neither need nor want the midrange dip. When a recording seems harsh, the dip, or the high frequency roll-off imposed by Audyssey Reference (just plain "Audyssey") does help. Because I don't have the app (my AVP won't interface with it) there is no way to separate the dip from the roll-off, so I can't tell which one is causing the improvement. Maybe it's both.
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post #5635 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by David Aiken View Post
No simple answer. It probably works better with some speakers than others and how well it works may depend on whether the speaker has a crossover between drivers in the range covered by the dip or not.

It may also depend on the listener. The midrange compensation dip is in the area where noise related hearing loss first becomes apparent and one of the first signs that people get of noise related hearing loss is difficulty in understanding speech because the loss first starts to appear in a frequency region important to voices. If someone has mild noise related hearing loss it's possible that the mid-range compensation dip could make the difference between them being able to understand dialog easily (turning the dip off) and not understanding dialog easily (having the dip on).

Like pretty much everything with Audyssey, there's no single universal answer that will suit everyone to your question.
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Originally Posted by garygarrison View Post
I think the original purpose of Audyssey's midrange compensation was to lessen the ill effects of a crossover near 2K, or so, where the ear is very sensitive, BUT Chris K. said that he never heard a speaker that didn't sound better with the dip engaged.



My speakers are 3-way, and don't have a crossover anywhere near 2K. If a recording seems to be "good," as are most Blu-rays, SACDs, and a somewhat lower number of CDs, I neither need nor want the midrange dip. When a recording seems harsh, the dip, or the high frequency roll-off imposed by Audyssey Reference (just plain "Audyssey") does help. Because I don't have the app (my AVP won't interface with it) there is no way to separate the dip from the roll-off, so I can't tell which one is causing the improvement. Maybe it's both.

Thanks!


Also, I'm wondering about my center channel speaker. For whatever reason, Audyssey is saying the crossover needs to be at 100 Hz, which it chooses 40 Hz for my towers. I know it measures in-room response, but I don't like crossing my towers so low. They are Wharfdale Diamond 10.7s. Going to 60 or 80 Hz sounds better to me. As for the center, 100 seems too high. I'd prefer to have all the speakers at the same XO, so 80 Hz seems fine. However, I read that it might not be a good idea to lower the XO Audyssey chooses. Raising it is OK, but not lowering. That said, do you think lowering my center from 100 Hz to 80 Hz would be a big deal? It's a pretty dang big speaker, and should easily handle 80 Hz.
https://www.musicdirect.com/speakers...nel-speaker-ea
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post #5636 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Overrid3 View Post
Thanks!


Also, I'm wondering about my center channel speaker. For whatever reason, Audyssey is saying the crossover needs to be at 100 Hz, which it chooses 40 Hz for my towers. I know it measures in-room response, but I don't like crossing my towers so low. They are Wharfdale Diamond 10.7s. Going to 60 or 80 Hz sounds better to me. As for the center, 100 seems too high. I'd prefer to have all the speakers at the same XO, so 80 Hz seems fine. However, I read that it might not be a good idea to lower the XO Audyssey chooses. Raising it is OK, but not lowering. That said, do you think lowering my center from 100 Hz to 80 Hz would be a big deal? It's a pretty dang big speaker, and should easily handle 80 Hz.
https://www.musicdirect.com/speakers...nel-speaker-ea
This reads like you are not using a sub or two. Try out your crossover points and see how it sounds to your ears - and that is all that matters.
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post #5637 of 6880 Old 12-03-2018, 11:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garygarrison View Post
I think the original purpose of Audyssey's midrange compensation was to lessen the ill effects of a crossover near 2K, or so, where the ear is very sensitive, BUT Chris K. said that he never heard a speaker that didn't sound better with the dip engaged.



My speakers are 3-way, and don't have a crossover anywhere near 2K. If a recording seems to be "good," as are most Blu-rays, SACDs, and a somewhat lower number of CDs, I neither need nor want the midrange dip. When a recording seems harsh, the dip, or the high frequency roll-off imposed by Audyssey Reference (just plain "Audyssey") does help. Because I don't have the app (my AVP won't interface with it) there is no way to separate the dip from the roll-off, so I can't tell which one is causing the improvement. Maybe it's both.
Gary,

I don't know why the BBC introduced the dip but they had their own speaker research and development area and they introduced it in some of the speakers they designed themselves for their own purposes so they were interested in getting better/more accurate response for monitoring purposes in their own studios which is what they were designing their speakers for. Then it spread to speakers designed by other people. There's no guarantee that the reason others started using it were the same as the reasons the BBC started using it.

Audyssey designed their Reference response curve based on studies of listener preferences. I've got no idea how those studies were conducted but they were looking at multichannel setups and the BBC was looking at stereo at the most, and perhaps only mono when they came up with the dip because mono remained the broadcast standard into the mid or late '60's. Room sizes for multichannel home setups are quite different to a lot of the BBC studio sizes and monitors are intended for different sorts of use to home setups which are used for listening for enjoyment. I have no idea how well the rooms and speaker choices used in Audyssey's preference tests relate to our own home choices but if there isn't a reasonable match between the setup choices in those studies and average home setup choices, then it's possible that the outcome of those preference studies might not be as relevant as one might wish to the general user situation.

I recently changed my AVR to a newer model which can use the Audyssey MultEQ app which allows you to remove the mid range compensation dip from the Reference curve and I've removed it from the Reference curve in my system. I don't think we can assume the dip will be appropriate with all speakers and it definitely isn't preferred by all users. I think we should always have had the option to defeat it but at least some of us now have the option thanks to the app. I didn't change my AVR just to get this ability but it's a nice extra that I got along with what I actually wanted.
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post #5638 of 6880 Old 12-04-2018, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Overrid3 View Post
Thanks!


Also, I'm wondering about my center channel speaker. For whatever reason, Audyssey is saying the crossover needs to be at 100 Hz, which it chooses 40 Hz for my towers. I know it measures in-room response, but I don't like crossing my towers so low. They are Wharfdale Diamond 10.7s. Going to 60 or 80 Hz sounds better to me. As for the center, 100 seems too high. I'd prefer to have all the speakers at the same XO, so 80 Hz seems fine. However, I read that it might not be a good idea to lower the XO Audyssey chooses. Raising it is OK, but not lowering. That said, do you think lowering my center from 100 Hz to 80 Hz would be a big deal? It's a pretty dang big speaker, and should easily handle 80 Hz.
https://www.musicdirect.com/speakers...nel-speaker-ea
Audyssey actually doesn't set crossovers, that's done by the bass management firmware provided by the AVVR manufacturer. Audyssey just does the calibration process and creates the filters. There are 2 cooks stirring the pot in this area, Audyssey and the AVR manufacturer.

My Marantz sets my 2 speakers (I only use a 2.2 setup) as Large. When I change that to Small, the AVR sets the crossover at 40 Hz and I change it to 80 Hz. If 60 or 80 Hz sounds better to you for the front speakers, go with what sounds better, after all you're listening for enjoyment and why would you want to shortchange yourself on that?

The question about the centre channel and lowering the crossover frequency is more difficult. There's no problem about raising the crossover but lowering it is another question. I'd recommend not lowering it but given that you're talking about only lowering it from 100 Hz to 80 Hz, then I'd be inclined to try it and see what it sounds like. The problem isn't so much about whether or not the speaker can handle 80 Hz, from the specs it obviously can but that's under the conditions under which it was tested and those conditions aren't the same as those the speaker is working with in your room. We don't know how different your room is to the conditions in which the speaker was tested when its specifications were determined but if the reason the crossover was set at 100 Hz was because of a modal dip or a cancellation at that frequency then you're not going to be able to avoid the existence of that dip and things should be expected to sound worse with the lower crossover. I don't think there's any real problems with having the crossover for the centre speaker set 20 Hz higher than the front L and R speakers. That's not a big difference but what you will hear will depend on how fast the speaker is rolling off below 100 Hz in your room. Just be aware that the speaker won't be getting correction over the whole range down to 80 Hz. If it were me I'd leave it at 100 Hz.
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post #5639 of 6880 Old 12-04-2018, 03:09 AM
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Originally Posted by David Aiken View Post
Audyssey actually doesn't set crossovers, that's done by the bass management firmware provided by the AVVR manufacturer. Audyssey just does the calibration process and creates the filters. There are 2 cooks stirring the pot in this area, Audyssey and the AVR manufacturer.

My Marantz sets my 2 speakers (I only use a 2.2 setup) as Large. When I change that to Small, the AVR sets the crossover at 40 Hz and I change it to 80 Hz. If 60 or 80 Hz sounds better to you for the front speakers, go with what sounds better, after all you're listening for enjoyment and why would you want to shortchange yourself on that?

The question about the centre channel and lowering the crossover frequency is more difficult. There's no problem about raising the crossover but lowering it is another question. I'd recommend not lowering it but given that you're talking about only lowering it from 100 Hz to 80 Hz, then I'd be inclined to try it and see what it sounds like. The problem isn't so much about whether or not the speaker can handle 80 Hz, from the specs it obviously can but that's under the conditions under which it was tested and those conditions aren't the same as those the speaker is working with in your room. We don't know how different your room is to the conditions in which the speaker was tested when its specifications were determined but if the reason the crossover was set at 100 Hz was because of a modal dip or a cancellation at that frequency then you're not going to be able to avoid the existence of that dip and things should be expected to sound worse with the lower crossover. I don't think there's any real problems with having the crossover for the centre speaker set 20 Hz higher than the front L and R speakers. That's not a big difference but what you will hear will depend on how fast the speaker is rolling off below 100 Hz in your room. Just be aware that the speaker won't be getting correction over the whole range down to 80 Hz. If it were me I'd leave it at 100 Hz.

Cool. I don't hear much change between the center at 100 Hz vs 80, so might as well just stick with the Audy setting. This is more of a question for the speaker setup section, but I'm wondering if maybe my center placement has something to do with this. It's inside the shelving of an entertainment center, but I have it pushed forward so it overhangs the front edge a little. Also, the shelf if below ear level, but I do have the speaker angled up towards. This isn't ideal, but not sure where else I can put it since the correct position for it is right where the TV screen is.


My entertainment center has a pole in back to enable mounting the screen up in the air. If I can raise it high enough, I might be able to move the center channel to the top shelf of the unit. Then, it'd be higher, and also not between two panes of glass. Not sure if this is a worthwhile experiment?


Here's a shot of my current setup:
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post #5640 of 6880 Old 12-04-2018, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Overrid3 View Post
Cool. I don't hear much change between the center at 100 Hz vs 80, so might as well just stick with the Audy setting. This is more of a question for the speaker setup section, but I'm wondering if maybe my center placement has something to do with this. It's inside the shelving of an entertainment center, but I have it pushed forward so it overhangs the front edge a little. Also, the shelf if below ear level, but I do have the speaker angled up towards. This isn't ideal, but not sure where else I can put it since the correct position for it is right where the TV screen is.


My entertainment center has a pole in back to enable mounting the screen up in the air. If I can raise it high enough, I might be able to move the center channel to the top shelf of the unit. Then, it'd be higher, and also not between two panes of glass. Not sure if this is a worthwhile experiment?


Here's a shot of my current setup:
Lots of things can affect the in room response of a speaker but position is most certainly one of them. Your centre speaker is almost certainly designed for use standing in relatively free space and sandwiched between 2 shelves is not in free space. I would bet on that having an effect, as well as the glass shelves having an effect, but I have no idea how much of an effect those things are going to have at the low end.

I'd try the experiment but there's no guarantee that it will affect the crossover setting.
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