Sound United Enters Agreement to Acquire Onkyo Home Audio - Page 6 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #151 of 157 Old 07-02-2019, 11:29 AM
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That is crazy! Battle of the S's...Samsung vs Sound United.

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post #152 of 157 Old 07-02-2019, 11:46 PM
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Originally Posted by dfa973 View Post
Sun sets on Japan's once-shining AV equipment industry

As market shrinks, Onkyo sells assets to focus on contract manufacturing
What does that mean - is this outside the consumer A/V business altogether, or are they looking to compete with Inkel on OEM production for consumer A/V products?

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post #153 of 157 Old 07-03-2019, 12:08 AM
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What does that mean - is this outside the consumer A/V business altogether, or are they looking to compete with Inkel on OEM production for consumer A/V products?
I have been asking this myself!
1. it seems that SU has the right to use the Onkyo brand for AV devices;
2. the actual production lines (factories) for AV devices still belong to "Onkyo"?
3. if the actual production lines (factories) for AV devices belong to SU, with what "Onkyo" will be able to "focus on contract manufacturing"?
4. "Onkyo" has another factory that still belongs to them?
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post #154 of 157 Old 09-03-2019, 05:46 PM
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No, I don't think the sub-35 crowd thinks that "home theater" is watching on a device, but I do think they're fine watching media on a device. The convenience is the overwhelming factor for them.

As far as movies go, I'm not sure their tastes are really any worse than previous generations. There was always a lot of popular crap. In retrospect, we tend to remember only the great films, but if you go back and look at the movie ads in old newspapers, it's amazing how much crap we've forgotten about. The difference today is I don't get the sense that they care about the past at all. When I was in college, there was a big Keaton/Chaplin revival and film history courses were popping up everywhere. A revival of Metropolis would sell out a theater. And I don't get the sense that most care about independent film (unless it's a Netflix film that becomes a social media trend). When I go to arthouses, the audiences are quite elderly.

The only time I see younger people apparently appreciating old films is in the summer when there's a weekly outdoor film festival at Bryant Park in NYC that draws at least 5000 people, maybe more. It so happens that it's a lousy way to see a movie because the screen is too small and there's slap-back echo from the library on the east side of the park so dialogue intelligibility is poor and it's also all mono, but people go because sitting on the grass with your friends and getting takeout food and wine and being there with the crowd is a fun experience. But they do cheer the films, although I now see that this year, the oldest film is from 1976. The schedule is Big (1988), Big Daddy (1999), TBD, To All the Boys I've Loved Before (2018), Carrie (1976), Bad Boys (1995), Coming to America (1988), Goodfellas (1990), Anchorman (2004), and TBD. Geez. They used to play films like Stalag 17.

I do think most of their music is crap, but generations before me thought my music was crap. We didn't make the music great - we were lucky that music, especially rock music, went through an especially creative period in the 1960s and 70s that was both experimental and looked to the past, as with the blues revival. Bad radio taught this generation to like crap, but they don't listen to OTA radio anymore, so maybe music will get better.
I just read they closed the Paris Theatre in NYC!

Do you remember when "theater" was spelled "theatre"?
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post #155 of 157 Old 09-03-2019, 07:35 PM
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I just read they closed the Paris Theatre in NYC!

Do you remember when "theater" was spelled "theatre"?
General usage in the U.S. is that legitimate (live) theatres use "theatre" and movie theaters use "theater". I don't know how it evolved that way, but it may have been that "...re" sounded too foreign or someone simply made a mistake at some point.

I'm not surprised that the Paris closed. People are simply not showing up. The kind of people who used to inhabit the upper east and west side art houses don't seem to exist anymore. I remember when such theaters played primarily independent and foreign films, primarily for sophisticated adults. But now "adults" want to see comic book movies featuring characters from their childhood and most of those theaters are gone. The only one left is the Cinema I, II, III and they mainly show mainstream films. I remember times when I'd see long lines outside the Paris and sold out shows. Those days are pretty much gone.

And their lease was up. In NYC when a retail lease is up, the landlord generally wants three times the last rent, sometimes much more. That's not possible for a movie theater. The revenues simply aren't there. AMC, the largest movie chain, averages overall ticket sales of only 100 per day, per screen (although it's probably far higher in NYC). IMO, that's embarrassing. They were profitable in Q2, but not enough to erase the big losses in Q1. And the Q3 already looks like a bust.

The Paris will probably wind up being a bank or a Starbucks. That's what almost everything is these days in Manhattan. We're losing everything that made NYC unique.

I accidentally came across an old issue of Variety from 1949, which wasn't a great year for movie theaters (the last great year was 1946) as TV (and other factors) were already taking a toll. But in this particular week in January of 1949, just 16 Manhattan movie theaters, with a total seating capacity of 39,375, sold $570,500 worth of tickets (about 477,000 tickets), which is $6.1 million in today's dollars. On average each theater did almost $42,000 per day in today's dollars. The average AMC theatre does about $1000 per screen and the average theater has 10 screens, so that's about $10,000 a day.

Since 1999, NYC has lost 40% of its movie theaters and since 2001, 13% of the net screen count. But due to smaller theaters and lounge seating, it's lost 29% of the net seats just since the end of 2015 and 59% of the seating capacity since 1987. We lost most of the record and book stores and even though there's been some recent openings in NYC, I think over time, we're going to lose a fair portion more of the movie theaters, especially when each of their leases are up. We have a generation that doesn't mind watching most movies on a tiny screen in mono or 2-channel stereo.
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post #156 of 157 Old 09-03-2019, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post
General usage in the U.S. is that legitimate (live) theatres use "theatre" and movie theaters use "theater". I don't know how it evolved that way, but it may have been that "...re" sounded too foreign or someone simply made a mistake at some point.

I'm not surprised that the Paris closed. People are simply not showing up. The kind of people who used to inhabit the upper east and west side art houses don't seem to exist anymore. I remember when such theaters played primarily independent and foreign films, primarily for sophisticated adults. But now "adults" want to see comic book movies featuring characters from their childhood and most of those theaters are gone. The only one left is the Cinema I, II, III and they mainly show mainstream films. I remember times when I'd see long lines outside the Paris and sold out shows. Those days are pretty much gone.

And their lease was up. In NYC when a retail lease is up, the landlord generally wants three times the last rent, sometimes much more. That's not possible for a movie theater. The revenues simply aren't there. AMC, the largest movie chain, averages overall ticket sales of only 100 per day, per screen (although it's probably far higher in NYC). IMO, that's embarrassing. They were profitable in Q2, but not enough to erase the big losses in Q1. And the Q3 already looks like a bust.

The Paris will probably wind up being a bank or a Starbucks. That's what almost everything is these days in Manhattan. We're losing everything that made NYC unique.

I accidentally came across an old issue of Variety from 1949, which wasn't a great year for movie theaters (the last great year was 1946) as TV (and other factors) were already taking a toll. But in this particular week in January of 1949, just 16 Manhattan movie theaters, with a total seating capacity of 39,375, sold $570,500 worth of tickets (about 477,000 tickets), which is $6.1 million in today's dollars. On average each theater did almost $42,000 per day in today's dollars. The average AMC theatre does about $1000 per screen and the average theater has 10 screens, so that's about $10,000 a day.

Since 1999, NYC has lost 40% of its movie theaters and since 2001, 13% of the net screen count. But due to smaller theaters and lounge seating, it's lost 29% of the net seats just since the end of 2015 and 59% of the seating capacity since 1987. We lost most of the record and book stores and even though there's been some recent openings in NYC, I think over time, we're going to lose a fair portion more of the movie theaters, especially when each of their leases are up. We have a generation that doesn't mind watching most movies on a tiny screen in mono or 2-channel stereo.

Thank you for taking the time to prepare your post. You make NYC more "real," even from CA.
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post #157 of 157 Old 10-04-2019, 03:16 AM
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Sound United ends plan to buy Onkyo and Pioneer.

The owner of Denon and Marantz is no longer acquiring Onkyo and Pioneer

Sound United has announced the termination of the agreement to acquire Onkyo's home audio division, announcing in a statement that the two companies have "mutually agreed" not to complete the deal.

The acquisition plans were revealed back in May, but it has since become apparent "that all of the necessary closing conditions could not be satisfactorily achieved".

Completion of the deal was naturally subject to various conditions, completion of satisfactory due diligence and securing of committed financing. It seems not all the boxes managed to get ticked.

Sound United already boasts brands including Denon, Marantz, Polk Audio, Classé and Boston Acoustics in its portfolio.

The move to add Onkyo's consumer audio division, which includes the Onkyo, Pioneer, Pioneer Elite, and Integra brands, was set to make the company an even bigger player in the home audio market. But for now at least, that deal is off.

https://www.whathifi.com/amp/news/so...yo-and-pioneer

Last edited by dfa973; 10-04-2019 at 04:00 AM.
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