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post #1 of 9 Old 10-15-2019, 06:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Protect Amps From Power Sags?

I've done enough research into this to be dangerous, so I'd like to hear from others. I have my amps plugged into a Panamax, that shows voltage. That voltage sags repeatedly - likely due to neighborhood AC usage - to the point where my power amps shut down. It doesn't seem to be related to the load from my system, as I can show low voltage when the system is idle, and good voltage when the system is cranking.

My concern isn't surge protection - I've got that covered - but reliable voltage. I don't know if a big UPC is the answer, or a power conditioner is required. Ideas?
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-15-2019, 08:05 AM
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I've done enough research into this to be dangerous, so I'd like to hear from others. I have my amps plugged into a Panamax, that shows voltage. That voltage sags repeatedly - likely due to neighborhood AC usage - to the point where my power amps shut down. It doesn't seem to be related to the load from my system, as I can show low voltage when the system is idle, and good voltage when the system is cranking.

My concern isn't surge protection - I've got that covered - but reliable voltage. I don't know if a big UPC is the answer, or a power conditioner is required. Ideas?

Assuming you live in a single family house then you are likely seeing drops in the voltage supplied by your electric utility. This voltage in your neighborhood should not have significant drops.

Your first step should be to complain to your local electric utility and any other appropriate parties. Document some of the voltage sags by time of day.

May I ask how low are the voltages dropping?
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-15-2019, 08:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Assuming you live in a single family house then you are likely seeing drops in the voltage supplied by your electric utility. This voltage in your neighborhood should not have significant drops.

Your first step should be to complain to your local electric utility and any other appropriate parties. Document some of the voltage sags by time of day.

May I ask how low are the voltages dropping?
It appears that voltages are dropping to the 106V to 108V range
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post #4 of 9 Old 10-15-2019, 08:57 AM
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It appears that voltages are dropping to the 106V to 108V range

Here is a link to a somewhat confusing document concerning allowed voltages:

http://www.powerqualityworld.com/201...-60-hertz.html

My interpretation is that on the first chart in the document, the column furthest to the left is what you should see for voltage at your point of use, the power amplifiers - 108V, which is -10% from the 120V nominal.

The limits on voltage supplied by the electric utility are shown on the second column. A guess is that this would be measured at your electric meter, but could be at the nearest transformer. This voltage should be a minimum of 114V, with the remainder of the drop to 108V in your house.

The above means that your voltage is unacceptably low as supplied by your electric utility. The utility should fix this problem. A first step is for the utility to measure the relevant voltages.

Low voltage causes damage to motors (refrigerator, A/C compressors, furnace fan motor, etc.) since it causes the motor to draw more current and thus get hotter. Low voltage also damages other electric and electronic devices. The low voltage isn't just affecting your use of your audio system, but is slowly causing hidden damage around your house.
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-15-2019, 09:26 AM
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Yes indeed call the electric company etc.. !
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-18-2019, 02:50 PM - Thread Starter
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As a follow-up, the utility company was of no help, and advised I call an electrician. I elected to get a Furman power conditioner, because they advertised their ability to compensate for low voltage and deliver voltage within the appropriate range. I installed the unit and it worked as claimed, but it also showed the available voltage at 115V, instead of the 106V or 108V tha the Panamax was showing. I'm now wondering if the Panamax, which is at least 25 years old, was the culprit. In any event, the problem appears to be solved.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-18-2019, 03:58 PM
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Suggest U get a better quality AC voltmeter, sounds like what U are U using is out of calibration...

Just my $0.02...
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-18-2019, 06:42 PM
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I use an APC power conditioner/UPS. If voltage drops it seamlessly goes to battery.

Issue is most likely circuit in your home though if it was dropping that low.

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post #9 of 9 Old 10-18-2019, 08:18 PM
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A regulated pwr supply should correct 105 (maybe 100) - 135 volts give or take.

When you get a “sag” do lights dim?

Turn off the breaker in the panel that provides power to your amp then make sure it is snug in box.

Check the outlet make sure all wire/lugs are tight. If you are comfortable doing it you can pop the breaker out of the panel and do the same. This should cover mechanical connections.

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