receiver turned up high just to hear at regular volume - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 11 Old 10-04-2016, 05:08 AM - Thread Starter
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receiver turned up high just to hear at regular volume

Hey all,
I tried to post this question last night, but I don't think it worked, so I'll try again. If it did get posted already, sorry for the duplicate question

Still playing around with the x4200w. I ran audyssey and all that fun stuff. However, when I am watching a movie or watching tv, I have to turn the volume up to -10db to hear it at a normal level. Does this seem right to you? It seems really high to me. My older receiver went to about -30db and that was loud.

Thoughts on this?

Thanks,
dave

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post #2 of 11 Old 10-04-2016, 05:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by davemsc View Post
I have to turn the volume up to -10db to hear it at a normal level.... My older receiver went to about -30db and that was loud.
Those markings don't tell you anything, because they're not referenced to a specific output level.
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post #3 of 11 Old 10-04-2016, 05:37 AM - Thread Starter
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Fair enough, it just seems that I have to turn up the denon much higher to it's upper limit that I think it should to listen to it at a normal volume. I could be completely wrong, but it just seems that way.

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post #4 of 11 Old 10-04-2016, 10:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by davemsc View Post
it just seems that I have to turn up the denon much higher to it's upper limit that I think it should to listen to it at a normal volume.
You might. The position of the volume control is no more accurate relative to output than the numbers on the dial. Google: Gain structure.
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post #5 of 11 Old 10-04-2016, 11:46 AM
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While Bill does have a point, if you ran Audyssey you should be getting similar output at about the same MV levels. Did you run Audyssey?

You didn't say with what source material this was, but I typically listen to blu rays at -13MV to -10MV, TV is around -30MV to -25MV and music anywhere from -35MV to -10MV depending on the mix and my mood.
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post #6 of 11 Old 10-04-2016, 11:52 AM
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If Dynamic Volume is "on", turn it "off" and see (hear) if that helps.

Also, is it overall content (stereo audio, multi-channel audio) that's hard to hear, or is it primarily just center-channel audio (such as dialogue)? If so, try bumping up the level of your CC channel by a few dB instead of raising the volume.
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post #7 of 11 Old 10-05-2016, 12:22 PM
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It's pretty normal to have to ride the master-volume to increase or decrease a source to taste.

It means nothing. The only thing that matters is the in-room SPL, which is a combination of: source track hotness and MV hotness, as well as listening distance, room size, speaker efficiency rating, gain structure and available amplifier power.

Some people listen at 3ft, some people listen at 30ft, and some listen at 1inch via headphones.
Some people have 100w, some people have 50,000watts
Some people have 3 86db/w/m speakers, and some have 9.X.4 100db/w/m speakers.


When I watch TV I usually have to turn my Oppo to 40-60%, for bluray 40-70% depending on the disc, for music I turn it the Oppo to 100% and use the Foobar and/or Windows to control the volume level (I sometimes like my music just a few db below clipping, i.e. LOUD).
Usually 40% is quiet or moderate, and 50-70% is THX to +15db.
These values mean nothing because my system is vastly different than yours. Even if you had an Oppo, my amps/speakers/subs are still vastly different than yours, so it would still be a meaningless number.

db's on the other hand are referenced to 0db (the quietest sound a human is "likely able" to hear, which isn't the same as the: "quietest possible sound that CAN occur" which is about -23db on that same scale.)

db is (more) consistent because most non-deaf people have (roughly) the same hearing-sensitivity and frequency-detection response. There is an age factor element but that is mostly ignored for simplicity sake.

95db is about ~1/10,000th atmospheric pressure.
121db is about ~1/500th atmospheric pressure.
155db is about ~1/100th atmospheric pressure.
194db is about ~1 full atmosphere worth of pressure.

0db is about ~1/5billionths atmospheric pressure.

0db is roughly the same sound-pressure that a pin makes when dropped from waist height onto cement at a distance of 20-40ft away.
It doesn't take many atoms colliding together to exceed 0db...
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-07-2017, 07:54 PM
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I had to exchange a Denon X2300W with an identical X2300W, but now I have to turn the volume up from 55 to 68 to have the same volume. I know for sure because I watch the same show each day and 55 now sounds very low.

Would this mean the amp isn't able to put out as much watts as the old one? Perhaps defective?

1) I made sure that every setting was exactly the same on the new Denon as the old one.
2) I tried redoing the Audyssey setup in case it changed something I had no manual control over
3) I made sure all the speakers were solidly connected, and polarity was correct.
4) The old Denon was only exchanged because I thought it had a video issue, but it turned out to be the hdmi cable quality, so it's not because the old one had an audio issue.

Thanks for any advice you might have!

Jim
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post #9 of 11 Old 12-07-2017, 08:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachguysb View Post
Would this mean the amp isn't able to put out as much watts as the old one? Perhaps defective?
I suspect it's something else because the condition of "the amp works however it has less maximum power than others of the same model number" is unheard of. I suspect a setting has changed [for example Audyssey Dynamic Volume or EQ]. I assume you have not changed the speakers, their position, distance, surround mode, nor any wiring.

is it possible some party altered the volume level coming out of your source, perhaps a cable/sat. box?
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-08-2017, 08:44 AM
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Sometimes there are variations in microphone sensitivity. Your previous one might have been somewhat "hard of hearing", so it had to turn up the receiver's trim levels for it to measure correctly, making sound levels high at your main listening position.

After calibration, a speaker volume control setting of about 65 to 70 (or -15 to -10) is typical when listening to movies. A setting of 55 is abnormally low for movies but about right for CDs. Unlike movies, CDs and TV programs don't have a standardized sound level.

Edited to add:

If you haven't already, please take the time to look through the Audyssey 101/FAQ. It'll help you to get a good calibration. The instructions in the equipment's owner's manual are pathetically inadequate.

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post #11 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 10:43 AM
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It did turn out to be a defect of the receiver. after a day, when surround or digital surround was chosen instead of direct, all sorts of popping and high pitched noises started happening on all sources.

I'm going back to the original Denon and returning this 2nd one.

Jim
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