Resonance in the Listening Room - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 5 Old 06-29-2019, 11:06 PM - Thread Starter
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Resonance in the Listening Room

I adapted part of a Florida room 24 x 16 x 8.5 ft to a listening room on one side, 16 x 12.5 x 8.5. I installed 7.2.4 with Atmos via SVS Prime Elevation speakers located at the corners near the ceiling. and pointed at the MLP. Other speakers are located as suggested by Dolby. Carpeted floor with pad; plaster ceiling; wood paneled walls. There is no left-hand wall between this space and the rest of the room. Other deviations: behind the 108" screen, there is a 7'9" x 5' window with narrow horizontal venetian blinds, now covered by a blanket. Behind the MLP, there are sliding glass doors extending to about half-way across the back wall from the left. I can't do much about these without major remodeling expense, except maybe partially covering the back wall/door with Sonex, and maybe treating the wall/window behind the screen.

I have fooled with sound equipment over about 50 years, and after calibrating my Denon with Audyssey, I am pretty happy with the sound, listening to about a dozen different 4K Atmos movies. The bass and lower midrange seem good; I don't think I have amp or speaker problems. But there is a problem which shows up mostly on CD's . There is a high midrange peak (I'm guessing about 3-4 KHz) which makes some music and occasionally voices have a harsh edge. For example, a diapason organ note falling within it sounds shrill. A few announcers' voices have a slight kazoo-like sound. The peak seems to be pretty narrow, and the Audyssey correction curve doesn't show much, a little 3-4 db bump. I think this is caused by a resonance within the room. My prime candidates: There is a centered chandelier with five bulbs inside glass chimneys, and metal shades resting on the chimneys. There are the venetian blinds, windows and doors (when I built the speaker stands, I noticed the pipes rang, so I deadened them), and I just don't see anything else.

I presently don't have any analysis equipment. My first test is to remove the chandelier lights. If this ain't it, any other suggestions? Thanks.

Last edited by uhdnut; 06-29-2019 at 11:17 PM.
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post #2 of 5 Old 06-30-2019, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uhdnut View Post
I adapted part of a Florida room 24 x 16 x 8.5 ft to a listening room on one side, 16 x 12.5 x 8.5. I installed 7.2.4 with Atmos via SVS Prime Elevation speakers located at the corners near the ceiling. and pointed at the MLP. Other speakers are located as suggested by Dolby. Carpeted floor with pad; plaster ceiling; wood paneled walls. There is no left-hand wall between this space and the rest of the room. Other deviations: behind the 108" screen, there is a 7'9" x 5' window with narrow horizontal venetian blinds, now covered by a blanket. Behind the MLP, there are sliding glass doors extending to about half-way across the back wall from the left. I can't do much about these without major remodeling expense, except maybe partially covering the back wall/door with Sonex, and maybe treating the wall/window behind the screen.

I have fooled with sound equipment over about 50 years, and after calibrating my Denon with Audyssey, I am pretty happy with the sound, listening to about a dozen different 4K Atmos movies. The bass and lower midrange seem good; I don't think I have amp or speaker problems. But there is a problem which shows up mostly on CD's . There is a high midrange peak (I'm guessing about 3-4 KHz) which makes some music and occasionally voices have a harsh edge. For example, a diapason organ note falling within it sounds shrill. A few announcers' voices have a slight kazoo-like sound. The peak seems to be pretty narrow, and the Audyssey correction curve doesn't show much, a little 3-4 db bump. I think this is caused by a resonance within the room. My prime candidates: There is a centered chandelier with five bulbs inside glass chimneys, and metal shades resting on the chimneys. There are the venetian blinds, windows and doors (when I built the speaker stands, I noticed the pipes rang, so I deadened them), and I just don't see anything else.

I presently don't have any analysis equipment. My first test is to remove the chandelier lights. If this ain't it, any other suggestions? Thanks.
Try wrapping a blanket or large towel around the chandelier temporarily to see if that makes any difference.

And if so you might want to consider removing the chandelier entirely and putting it somewhere else.

Geoff A. J., California
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post #3 of 5 Old 06-30-2019, 03:44 PM
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Could be the speakers themselves. I guess you will figure that out by a process of elimination. However, if you have any onboard EQ ability in your receiver, you might try that, as you are aware of the range of the problematic frequencies.

One other thought, you might consider getting some measurement ability, like a dB meter, or REW ... to eliminate the guessing.

Oh, the other obvious possibility are those venetian blinds.

It's a VIRTUAL channel unless stated otherwise.

Last edited by RayGuy; 06-30-2019 at 03:48 PM.
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post #4 of 5 Old 07-01-2019, 11:02 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RayGuy View Post
Could be the speakers themselves. I guess you will figure that out by a process of elimination. However, if you have any onboard EQ ability in your receiver, you might try that, as you are aware of the range of the problematic frequencies.

One other thought, you might consider getting some measurement ability, like a dB meter, or REW ... to eliminate the guessing.

Oh, the other obvious possibility are those venetian blinds.
Thanks for your answers.

I eliminated the chandelier by dismantling it. I lowered the volume a lot and moved up close (3 to 6 inches) to the main speakers, and I think I hear the same effect. It might be that the speaker tweeters have developed problems. They are in Phase Technology Teatro 11.5's, and are probably twenty years old. Or it might be I've developed a hearing problem; I had radiation treatment for my throat two years back. The odd thing is I don't hear this harshness in sounds from the environment, and only with CD music and certain TV voice sources from my system. The audio from my 4K movies sounds great, seemingly nothing amiss. Still puzzling. Next thing, substitute some different speakers.
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post #5 of 5 Old 07-03-2019, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uhdnut View Post
There is a high midrange peak (I'm guessing about 3-4 KHz) which makes some music and occasionally voices have a harsh edge. For example, a diapason organ note falling within it sounds shrill. A few announcers' voices have a slight kazoo-like sound. The peak seems to be pretty narrow, and the Audyssey correction curve doesn't show much, a little 3-4 db bump. [...] My first test is to remove the chandelier lights. If this ain't it, any other suggestions? Thanks.
This is more a note of solidarity than suggestions. In my experience, 3-4 dB in the range you are talking about is clearly audible and makes a difference along the lines you are discussing. Resonances are highly annoying, and if it is a resonance, the peak may be smoothed out in the curve you're looking at. With your 50 yr of experience, you probably have experienced that, too.

I have usually found HF peaks far more audible on certain types of music (solo keyboard, violin, soprano) than on others, and on some recordings (made with peaky mics?) than others. Finally, I think that automated systems (and I use one now) are rarely perfect and often benefit from manual touch-up. Sometimes, a new set of measurements can help, but often, manual eq is the best route, assuming nothing is defective (as I guess you are thinking your speakers might be).

Sometimes, measurement can help pinpoint this, but sometimes, it is more useful to play around with some parametric EQ.

So I wish you the best of luck, and I hope you can resolve this in a musically satisfying way!

Mike (Portland, Oregon -- no longer in North Carolina)

Main 2.2 system: Synology NAS, Auralic Aries G1 streamer, Anthem STR (DAC-)Preamp, Bryston 4B3 amp, Janszen Valentina mains, 2x JL Audio F112 subs. Desktop 2.1 system: JRiver Media Center, Classe CP-800 DAC-preamp, Marsh A400s power amp, Harbeth P3ESR, B&W ASW610.

Last edited by Mike in NC; 07-03-2019 at 01:12 AM. Reason: clarity
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