ATMOS Speakers Theory Question - Tweeter and Midrange Placement Build Variations - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 1 Old 01-13-2020, 02:44 PM - Thread Starter
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ATMOS Speakers Theory Question - Tweeter and Midrange Placement Build Variations

Currently I have been swapping into and out of my setup various Atmos speakers (PSB's XA, Klipsch 500sa and 140sa and the SLS elevation and Sony which I returned already) as I end up landing on my eventual 7.1.4 or 7.1.2 up-firing Atmos setup. Thank goodness for free return shipping right?


A bit of context for my questions below:
I have a 7.5 foot ceiling, which is a wee bit less than ideal than the 8-12 foot Dolby recommendation. I will be sitting about 10 feet away from the front up-firing Atmos drivers and about 5-6 feet away from the rear (if I even end up choosing to include them, asthetics issue and my wife is giving me the "eye"... better battles to potentially fight, ha) . Due to my ceiling height and my distance to my listening position from the front set, I believe the reflected sound is landing unfortunately a little too in front of my listening position. I think the reflection bounces so to speak more "up and down" than "left to right" as I believe I need. I also read that most Atmos speakers are built with a 22 degree angle. To compensate for what I need, I am considering manipulating the angle of the up-firing speakers very slightly to "land" a little further back towards my listening position. I have a Marantz6013 that will calibrate everything, just FYI).


Here are my questions with all of that context considered:



I have noticed (have you?) that some speaker brands with Atmos drivers (i.e., PSB's XA) place the tweeter as part of their build on the lower side of the up-firing angled driver (i.e., few inches closer to my listening position) with the midrange further back, while brands like Klipsch (500sa, 140sa and more) reverse this and place the tweeter further back and midrange closer to the listening position. I believe this impacts the overall reflected angle and I don't know then how to use than information to help me choose which driver to select all else being about equal. Understanding this and that a midrange driver plays more information on the sound spectrum than a tweeter, I am wondering:
  1. If it is "better" for the midrange or tweeter to be mounted closer to my listening position because of the difference in the reflection angle achieved, as it will hit different points of my ceiling and will thus reflect a longer or shorter angles downw towards me?
  2. Should I care/focus more on the tweeter positioning in an Atmos setup or the midrange or neither?. (i.e., for surround side channels, it is usually more ideal for the tweeter to be closer to ear level {1-2 feet)...why do we focus on the tweeter here....is this different with Atmos?)
  3. if either speaker (tweeter or midrange) being "closer" simply doesn't matter, then why would different brands place them differently in their speaker build? What is that logic model?
As you can see, I can over think it (ha!) and need to just listen to my environment and take notes and breaks in between to land on a final decision, but I enjoy understanding the theory. I haven't even gotten into all my rear channel thoughts....you guys would boot me or give me a red card.


I appreciate whatever perspective you care to add.

Last edited by libertyguy20; 01-13-2020 at 02:48 PM.
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