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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Upon doing more research for treating my HT I find some people mention 1" for the front and sides and others say thicker is better and 2" is sweet spot for front and sides.


I also am confused on having a "dead room", again i read that since the studios record in a perfectly dead room you should mimic that in your HT. Others say there should be a mix of absobers and diffusers.


I know alot depends on the shape and size of the room, but is there a general rule of thumb that i can go by and test with my room.


This is only for mid/high, i have my bass traps covered.


Thanks in advance


Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxtrom /forum/post/18311739


Upon doing more research for treating my HT I find some people mention 1" for the front and sides and others say thicker is better and 2" is sweet spot for front and sides.

It depends on the frequencies you want to absorb. Typically, one wants to absorb equally across all frequencies, so the thicker the better.

Quote:
I also am confused on having a "dead room", again i read that since the studios record in a perfectly dead room you should mimic that in your HT. Others say there should be a mix of absobers and diffusers.

You definitely do not what a completely dead room. Besides, studios rarely record in a perfectly dead room and, even if they did, they would be adding ambience.

Quote:
I know alot depends on the shape and size of the room, but is there a general rule of thumb that i can go by and test with my room.

Consult the relevant websites and/or read up on it. I suggest Everest as a good start.


Oh, there is also a nice thread here on acoustical treatments. Ask there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Would 2" on front and 1" on sides be something to think about? 2" all around might be too "dead" no?
 

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I think it depends how much you're going to put in the room. If you're going to put panels on the wall only at the reflections points, perhaps 2" is best. If you're going to put it along the entire walls to just above ear level, then maybe 1" is best so you don't over deaden the room.


My overall understanding is that you're trying to absorb the high frequencies more than the other ranges to avoid smearing the acoustic image.


In my theater I plan to do 2" behind the AT screen wall, and 1" along the side and back walls.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxtrom /forum/post/18314022


Would 2" on front and 1" on sides be something to think about? 2" all around might be too "dead" no?

You seem to be thinking in terms that don't include frequency. Frequency is everything when discussing acoustic treatments. In the bass range, rooms have various modes at specific frequencies. Reflections only occur in certain frequency ranges (that relate to room size, but generally, everything above mid-bass), affected by the reflecting material and angle. Likewise acoustic treatments have different effects at different frequencies, and have different effects by thickness, angle of incidence, material, etc..


Your first step is to find out what the acoustic problems are in your untreated room, then second design the treatments to deal with those problems.


For a quick start, deal with the ubiquitous "first reflection" off the side walls (and remember that floor and ceiling also have them, although treatment may not be required). For those I prefer 2", though 1" may be fine for you. And the material that covers the treatment (for appearance - OC703 is ug-lee) can make or break it.
 

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In most small rooms (existing construction, not purpose-built) there really isn't much point in 1" panels. 2" panels will do everything 1" panels will do plus give you help down to 250Hz or so, something almost every small room can use.


Frank
 

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2" minimum is a good rule of thumb.



And for bass absorption, 1" won't do jack; 2" is okay; 4" is better.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMF /forum/post/18330544


1" won't do jack; 2" is okay; 4" is better.

It's almost always best to do 4" absorbers when you've got the space to accommodate.


Frank
 
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