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A couple comments, assuming you're talking about Home Theater projectors:

- LCD and DLP projectors tend to offer more light output than LCoS models.
This is not really true anymore, in fact in the "high end" (>$3k MSRP) area, DLP and LCDs are often the dimmest of the available options, with peak, calibrated light output less than (often well less) than 1000 Lumens. In contrast, Sony and JVC (LCoS) are all generally producing over 1500 calibrated Lumens. Epson seems to have improved things with their latest generation.

Even when you get into the "big iron" territory, over $20k, over 2000 Lumens, JVC and Sony are there with 3000 and 4000-5000 Lumen LCoS machines (respectively). It's really hard to imagine a home theater screen that couldn't be lit by an LCoS machine.

2. Light Output

- The maximum light output of a projector is measured in lumens or ANSI lumens.

- Like the power ratings of audio amplifiers or AV receivers, manufacturers measure light output in such a way that they obtain as high a number as possible, which might not reflect real-world usage.

- In single-chip DLP projectors, the maximum brightness of white light is often much higher than adding together the maximum brightnesses of red, green, and blue. The difference between white and color light output can potentially result in dimmer colors than the light-output spec would seem to indicate. This not an issue with LCD, LCoS, and 3-chip DLP projectors.
This is completely wrong in the >$3k market, this is Epson marketing BS and (generally) only apples to business class DLPs. Most (if not all) >$3k MSRP home theater DLPs have no white segment and produce "full" brightness for white.

- Several companies, including Digital Projection, Optoma, SIM2, and Vivitek, have announced projectors that use the new 4K/UHD DLP chip, which has a resolution of 3840x2160 using a "pixel-doubling" technique. None of these projectors are available as of this writing.
This is also marketing, these DLPs do not produce a resolution of 3840x2160, they are no different than the so calld "faux-K" solutions you reference, see this review. They cannot display individual 3840x2160 pixels due to the overlap of the shifted pixels. They may look sharper than their "faux-K" brethren, but that is going to be due to the higher native resolution of the imaging device and the fact that they're single chip and don't have the alignment issues.

- If you're shopping at the high end of the budget scale, I recommend getting a projector with true 4K/UHD resolution.
This is a gross oversimplification of the situation, and ignores many other aspects of image quality. I suggest you look at some of the Sony vs JVC shootouts. Many have found that the inferior lens on the Sony 365/665 handicap their chips native resolution significantly, to the point where they produce an image that is no more detailed than their pixel shifting brethren.


7. HDR or Not?
You make no mention of WCG or if it's important, I think most here who have actually used UHD Blu-ray with projection would agree that it's important to have WCG support, it's one of the bigger improvements that UHD Blu-ray brings to the table.
 

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As others mentioned, I wonder the same about 3D technology. I never see it listed as a feature in the high end projectors. Is it something included "as default"? to is it that they have different models for 3D technology.
 

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Hello Scott,


Great thread. Please advise if using the pj's 'blanking', reduces :

-".....Some of the projector's pixels are used to reproduce the black letterbox bars, leaving fewer pixels to be used in the image."

Thanks
Scott G.
 

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Good article. One thing maybe worth mentioning: the Sony Vw365 does not have lens memory unlike the others in the category.
 

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Great article but like most similar articles, it leaves out the "consider what you watch" bullet point. I watch BD movies only but the vast majority is 70s and 80s titles put out by companies such as Code Red, Vinegar Syndrome, Synapse Films etc. None of this stuff will ever get the HDR treatment, and I can't imagine that watching a low budget 70s slasher upscaled/e-shifted/whatever to 4K is a good, or rather authentic-feeling, experience. And I'm just one example with one type of content preference. If you mostly watch TV shows you'll want to be careful about going too big; the shooting style used for many network shows is a recipe for headaches for many people if they sit too close to too big a screen. (YMMV - test before settling on a size!)

Long story short: all content is not created equal when it comes to shopping for a projector.
 
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Great and informative post, of course.. But.. Adding to "consider what you watch": In my own situation, I watch Dish Hopper, 95%+ of time. Therefore, 4k Projector did not make sense to me. I got a $90k 1080p projector for a fraction of price, which has a wonderful 2k picture! I checked out some of the afore mentioned under $10k, uhd projectors. They were far less desirable to me, compared to the Wolf dcx1000i, which I bought.
There are amazing $25k to $90k 1080 projectors from high end manufacturers, with amazing lenses, which also should be considered, if you are watching mostly Dish/Directv/Netflix/Amazon etc.

Again, it is a personal preference but I would highly recommend one of those $25k+ used projectors. Lumens are high. Just watch out for lamp replacement cost. I have a good lamp source I can recommend - Ralph Fenton at Atlas bulb. I can PM you, his email, if you are interested.

About calibration: I realize I might get scolded here.. but I am not such a great proponent of Calibration - especially because, the calibrator from your local store might barely be any good. There are excellent calibrators on this forum and if you have a high end $20k+ projector, certainly, you might benefit from Calibration but for a $3k projector, I would not bother with calibration. While calibration might well improve the picture, you really won't miss it, if you don't get it.
I have used ChadB to calibrate my Wolf DCX1000i. He worked very hard. He is a great guy! I would highly recommend him.. But here is the thing.. a few months after he left, my projector had reset. I lost Chad's calibration.. I just set it up myself, visually. The picture is still as good as I can remember.. I didnt try and get Chad back.. Perhaps I am not as knowledgeable in the finer color gamuts etc.. I am quite sure that the colors are not perfect but frankly, I don't care.. The picture is still amazing..
 

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I began my projector/screen research a couple weeks ago and the info in this article is extremely helpful...thank you.

So far, I've narrowed my projector choices down to the Epson 6050UB, Sony 295ES and JVC NX5. I plan on using a Screen Innovations Solo Pro 2 90-100" motorized screen (probably ALR) that will come down in front of 3 narrow floor to ceiling windows that will have black out drapes. I will be using the projector for movies, sports and gaming.

Anyone know of a dealer in the Northern Virginia/Washington DC area that's knowledgeable and experienced with my particular situation is greatly appreciated.
 

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One of the main reasons many people get a projector is to try to approximate the "big screen" experience with the largest screen possible.

With that in mind, here's a word of caution:

Be careful about getting the largest possible screen for your room, because you may end up in a situation that makes it hard to upgrade. Leave yourself a little wiggle room.

A decade ago, a bought a Panasonic AE3000 and paired it with a 115-inch wide 2.39:1 screen. That was the biggest screen I could get for my room, which is a little more than fourteen feet from the screen to the back wall.

Now I'm trying to find a new projector that will work in the same space, with the same screen, and my options are sorely limited.

One reason: The AE3000 itself is only a foot long. Most modern projectors seem to be a foot and a half. That means the lens will be 6 inches closer to the screen and the projector won't be able to fill the screen. Other variables can come into play besides the length of the chassis, such as different throw distances for different manufacturers.

So again, when you're figuring out your room, go big but don't max out. If I'd given myself a little wiggle room, even just a few inches, I would have a lot more options right now.

$0.02
 

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This is a very old thread, but as far as screen size goes, it's simple to make a bigger screen smaller (triple black velvet or velvet tape or just change your masking setup), but making a smaller screen bigger is something that takes quite a bit of skill.

Since most of us have masking panels, I'm not sure that making the screen too big really matters, I would saying picking one that is too small is the issue.
 

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Great and informative post, of course.. But.. Adding to "consider what you watch": In my own situation, I watch Dish Hopper, 95%+ of time. Therefore, 4k Projector did not make sense to me. I got a $90k 1080p projector for a fraction of price, which has a wonderful 2k picture! I checked out some of the afore mentioned under $10k, uhd projectors. They were far less desirable to me, compared to the Wolf dcx1000i, which I bought.
There are amazing $25k to $90k 1080 projectors from high end manufacturers, with amazing lenses, which also should be considered, if you are watching mostly Dish/Directv/Netflix/Amazon etc.

Again, it is a personal preference but I would highly recommend one of those $25k+ used projectors. Lumens are high. Just watch out for lamp replacement cost. I have a good lamp source I can recommend - Ralph Fenton at Atlas bulb. I can PM you, his email, if you are interested.

About calibration: I realize I might get scolded here.. but I am not such a great proponent of Calibration - especially because, the calibrator from your local store might barely be any good. There are excellent calibrators on this forum and if you have a high end $20k+ projector, certainly, you might benefit from Calibration but for a $3k projector, I would not bother with calibration. While calibration might well improve the picture, you really won't miss it, if you don't get it.
I have used ChadB to calibrate my Wolf DCX1000i. He worked very hard. He is a great guy! I would highly recommend him.. But here is the thing.. a few months after he left, my projector had reset. I lost Chad's calibration.. I just set it up myself, visually. The picture is still as good as I can remember.. I didnt try and get Chad back.. Perhaps I am not as knowledgeable in the finer color gamuts etc.. I am quite sure that the colors are not perfect but frankly, I don't care.. The picture is still amazing..
wo
 

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would also add, 10 % of men have some degree of red/green colored blindness. Would be sure you could appreciate the fine calibration of colors before you spend a lot of money...
 
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