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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read about 100W DC power over HDBaseT. It looks like this is accomplished using all 4 pairs in an Ethernet cable. I assume that does NOT mean an entire Ethernet cable is used JUST for power as otherwise I could just pull a much smaller single core cable. Therefore, does that mean the signal (some 10Gbs of data) is modulated on top of the DC power that is delivered over the 4 pairs?


I am asking this because if an entire Ethernet cable is used for power delivery (and no data) then I will have to pull a 3rd Ethernet cable to each location (I was only planning on 2 per drop, one of HDBaseT incl power in the future plus one more for Ethernet/backup).
 

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Correct, it's providing power on each pair along with signal. Same technique as Power-over-Ethernet, just with all four pairs used (to get that 100W total).

Are you actually planning on using the power feature of HDBaseT? I wouldn't expect to see consumer displays include that support.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you actually planning on using the power feature of HDBaseT? I wouldn't expect to see consumer displays include that support.
Thanks for the response. I really would like to use the power feature (eliminate another cable and outlet). However, at this time it seems there isn't much adoption for it. Still, I want to prepare for it in case it does happen. If the power distribution introduces other limitations then I would have pulled a 3rd Ethernet cable to each location. However, it seems it doesn't and hence I stay with the 2 cables I planned for (shielded CAT6a for future proofing, overkill but measured on the whole project it doesn't cost that much more).
 

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If the power distribution introduces other limitations then I would have pulled a 3rd Ethernet cable to each location.
3rd cable does allow you to use the cheaper, non-HDBaseT solutions...

However, it seems it doesn't and hence I stay with the 2 cables I planned for (shielded CAT6a for future proofing, overkill but measured on the whole project it doesn't cost that much more).
Save your money and just run UTP cat6. Even the HDBaseT folks warn about STP being difficult and no help if it's not done right... It's not just overkill - it can be worse. Run more cabling with that savings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Save your money and just run UTP cat6. Even the HDBaseT folks warn about STP being difficult and no help if it's not done right... It's not just overkill - it can be worse. Run more cabling with that savings.
Jautor, thanks for the comment. I am trying to understand why a lot of people are against F/UTP (S/UTP). Terminating and grounding the CAT cables to a patch panel designed for shielded cables does not seem particularly hard. Then one just grounds the patch panel to the metal of the rack and from there to ground or directly to ground if there is no rack. From the patch panel one then uses shielded patch cables to connect to the switch (also grounded). Am I missing something or is one of those steps considerably more complicated than what I am envisioning?
 

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I am trying to understand why a lot of people are against F/UTP (S/UTP). Terminating and grounding the CAT cables to a patch panel designed for shielded cables does not seem particularly hard. Then one just grounds the patch panel to the metal of the rack and from there to ground or directly to ground if there is no rack. From the patch panel one then uses shielded patch cables to connect to the switch (also grounded). Am I missing something or is one of those steps considerably more complicated than what I am envisioning?
All of those steps are more complicated and a source for mistakes when compared to UTP. And since STP isn't required (or generally even necessary) for most if not all residential AV / networking purposes, it becomes nothing but an unnecessary expense and a burden...

Again, if "cost isn't an issue" - I would recommend spending the delta on more UTP cable runs to more places, rather than fewer STP cables to fewer locations.
 

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HDBT power distribution - as jautor says is more likely to be seen in 'Hotel' type applications with small LCD TV's with embedded HDBT Receiver chips, in the Residential Market where you are not usually working with embedded HDBT the PoH feature is being used to power the HDBT Zone Receiver.


Sheilded UTP can cause more problems than it potentially cures in a Residential install - decent quality solid core CAT6 such as the Black Box 'Giga True 550Mhz' cable is ideal for Residential projects.


Joe
 
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