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I am confused about 1080p specifications and compatibility issues.


I own Sharp LCD's that are all 1080p but will not play any 1080p DirectTV programing?


My question is about 1080p/24, 1080p/60, deep color support, Blu-ray 1080p, DirectTV 1080p, pull down menus 3/2, 2/2, and bit rate options.


This is confusing to me.


I am considering replacing my Pioneer Elite Pro1410HD with the Panasonic TH-65VX100U. Will this set support all aspects of a 1080p signal now and future.



Can someone help me understand how this stuff works?
 

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Good place to start...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1080p


The number after the p refers to the number of frames per second.


Now with Directv, they can only output 1080p/24 so if your set can't accept that, it won't work.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by robert5545 /forum/post/18192227


I am confused about 1080p specifications and compatibility issues.


I own Sharp LCD's that are all 1080p but will not play any 1080p DirectTV programing?


My question is about 1080p/24, 1080p/60, deep color support, Blu-ray 1080p, DirectTV 1080p, pull down menus 3/2, 2/2, and bit rate options.


This is confusing to me.

Not all HDTV's that are 1080p resolution will display a 1080p input. This is a limitation of the input signal processing circuitry in the set. Most sets with this limitation were early 1080p versions, and I don't believe any currently available 1080p sets have this limitation.

Quote:
I am considering replacing my Pioneer Elite Pro1410HD with the Panasonic TH-65VX100U. Will this set support all aspects of a 1080p signal now and future.

The only way to know for sure is to check the manufactures specifications, but a current 1080p set may or may not be compatible with 3D 1080p, which is soon to be available.


DirecTV, and all other multichannel providers, have very limited 1080p programs at this time; only a few PPV HD movies. None of the linear 24/7 channels are available in 1080p, and none are expected anytime soon.


Current 1080p sources are Blu-ray, select games on XBox & PS3, a few PPV movies on DirecTV & Dish Network.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by robert5545 /forum/post/18192227


I am considering replacing my Pioneer Elite Pro1410HD with the Panasonic TH-65VX100U. Will this set support all aspects of a 1080p signal now and future.

Of course not. Nothing is future proof. Even if it supported everything we know is coming up in the near future, in 7 years, there will likely be something else that comes along that it won't do.


Years ago, you could buy technology and expect it to stay current because things didn't change very quickly.


However, since the mid 90's, the speed of innovation has jumped exponentially, so computers won't last you 7 years anymore, a TV won't allow you to view all the choices out there for decades to come and there's always some new tech to make cars lighter, safer or more able to make you comfortable while it helps you find where you need to go.


On the other hand, toasters still can't toast bread worth a darn, so take comfort in that.


About the only thing you can count on with electronics devices for the near future is they'll likely be made in China and they'll all cause cancer or lead poisoning in the state of California - especially if you lick them.


My advice:


While waiting for the next big thing generally means you're always waiting, I think waiting to buy a new TV is appropriate here. Wait until more model choices come out that support the upcoming 3D standard(s) since you know that is definitely coming. Sure they'll be more expensive in the short term, but you won't regret not buying in later if you decide you want in. While you wait, put some extra money away out of each pay check and you'll have the difference in price pretty well covered by summer or fall.


Even if 3D doesn't interest you now, it might later. It will be more expensive in many cases to get the ability later after you've already bought a screen that doesn't support it.


I wouldn't worry about 1080p so much now. Any Blu-ray player will output a signal in several ways to accommodate a TV that doesn't support 1080p24 video. As far as the 1080p VOD stuff, there isn't that much of it right now, anyway. In short, you can apply a few band-aids to muddle through for a bit longer.


Personally, I think this would be about the worst time to consider buying a new TV.
 
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