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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would appreciate advice regarding the recommended hardware configuration for HD video editing. I have lots of videos in 60p (live in PAL country) and plan to purchase a new laptop to use at home for video editing.


What would be the minimal requirements for hardware (CPU, RAM, graphic card) and the optimal ones? I can imagine there is no upper limit... Waht particular brand would you recommend, system?


Thanks in advance for any info!
 

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Any reason for a laptop over a desktop if it's going to be at home? You'll get a lot more 'bang for your buck' with a desktop.


As a rule of thumb though, for best editing capabilities (and if money is no object) Get something with an i7 CPU a dedicated GPU that can handle either cuda or openCL, and lots of RAM.


Personally, I just re-built my machine and because I was on a tight budget, I went with an AMD FX-6300 processor and Radeon HD-7770 GPU and 8GB of RAM. Using Vegas Video 12, I am able to edit and render 1080p AVCHD files with ease....and all for under $500! Rendering speed would of course have been faster had I gone with the i7...but I just set up the computer and let it run...it'll finish when it's done! :p


As a side note on GPU selection. Pick your Editing software first....and then see what that supports! I know that some versions of Premiere only supported CUDA (nvidia cards) whereas Vegas Video supports both.


As for brands, I'd stay away from HP. I have had numerous HPs crap out on me. Here at work, we are going through their SSD's like crazy. But I'm sure others would swear by their products. When I re-built my desktop, I also purchased a new dell laptop (nothing powerful, just for the usual web browsing and whatnot) and it has not given me a single problem!
 

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HP's have/had the highest return rate. I'm not sure what the #'s manufactured were so maybe the stats were skewed.

Anyway, I dislike HP. Other than pricepoint, their laptops seems to have at least 1 main issue. My last one was an i5 & several hundred cheaper than comparable hardware. 2years after ownership, the left hinge self-destructed & broke everything around it (impossible to fix without). That essentially made the laptop non-portable; it's a known problem with that model & HP does not care.


Too many brands to gamble imo
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks a lot for the suggestions.

The idea is to get laptop for its - even if limited by weight - portability. Life's busy and time at home's limited and I want to at least be at the same room with my family, even if it's not a really quality time...


Interesting what you both wrote about HP - in fact two weeks ago I purchased one, good price for the specification offered. Took i home, turned it one and it could not connect to internet... That was not the only problem - in spite of decent hardware (I7-4700MQ, 8GRAM, GT750M 4G) the laptop was at times very slow. Something I have never seen at any brand new machine. The company sent a technician to my place but he could not do anything either about internet connection or the slow processing. I returned it of course.

Right now I'm considering ASUS N550 and Dell Inspiron 15H, the former has better specification, the latter seems to be of better quality. I realize rendering times will very much depend on CPU power, I can wait and let the laptop work at night, electricity is cheaper then...



BTW re the hardware do you think that what HP offered (as above) would be enough? The laptop was advertised as the one for playing games and I thought if it can handle games it should as well be able to handle video editing...

Unfortunately that very one HP could not even handle itself...



What software would you recommend?
 

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You have exactly the right hardware specs for video editing.


The key to fast rendering times, however, is the GPU (and the amount of memory it has) not the CPU and you have chosen a good spec GPU.


You want to get editing software that uses CUDA - it will exploit the Nvidia graphics card (one example: Sony Vegas).


The next thing you need to be concerned about, however, is the screen quality - how much of the color gamut does it display? Is it glossy or matte? Is it IPS? You are going to make decisions in editing based on what you see on the screen, so it better be accurate. I am afraid you can only judge the screen quality by actually testing it in person. The variation across models and brands in screen quality is enormous, particularly color rendition. And the specs that are provided are usually uninformative about color rendition, viewing angles, etc.
 

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Did the technician ever tried getting the laptop online through eighter an Ethernet cable or by using a USB WiFI adapter? That way, it might have been able to have gotten online and then update some of the drivers, softwares, etc. After that, he could have then tried to see if it'll work without Ethernet or a WiFi adapter. That might have also increased the speed of the computer. For example, HP could have provided software fixes by now. It's also true that sometimes computers aren't put together properly so no guarantee it would solve all issues.


With the Windows task manager on, I can clearly see my CPU taking a nice hit while playing back a timeline with a lot of angles. Same when I'm exporting my file.
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishywishy  /t/1521221/1080p60-editing-hardware#post_24449873


i think you got that backwards
Meaning GPU versus CPU.


No, I do not. Rendering times depend on GPU in editing software that makes use of it. Ken Ross and I both have reported our experiences, not that this is not well known and understood. GPU, not CPU. Put an Nvidia graphics card in your machine using Vegas and you will see a speed-up of 2-3X.


DaVinci Resolve won't even work without a dedicated GPU, because relying on CPU's would be impossibly slow.
 

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My understanding was that the GPU was important for fluid editing, but that full rendering depended primarily on your CPU, depending on what exactly you are doing (ray tracing on AE uses the GPU for example). The GPU is used to accelerate encoding/decoding, but the actual transformation of the frames done by your edits is handled by the CPU. That is where most of the heavy lifting is done for rendering, not the encode/decode.


If I fire up GPU/CPU monitoring programs while rendering from PP, the increase in GPU activity is fairly small, but the CPU is approaching maximum activity on all cores and threads.
 

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I would suggest one of the ASUS ROG G750 Series Notebooks.


Either the G750JX-DB71 or the G750JH-DB71, or wait for the new upgrade models which are just around the corner, like the Asus ROG G750JZ with NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 880M GPU ..................


17.3" Matte Screen

RAM 16 GB DDR3 up to 32GB. More RAM is very important for editing speed.

256GB SSD or 128GBx2 SSD in RAID 0 + 1TB HDD (swap the HDD with a faster one. According to spec the Notebook HDD is only 5400rpm. which is too slow for video)

Intel® Thunderbolt™ technology + USB 3.0 for use with external archival storage.


Very Quiet and solid Laptop.
 

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Their are definitely trade-offs with getting the most powerful laptops since they are usually the biggest, heaviest and ultra expensive. The Asus ROG G750JZ is huge! ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEVdFXZVeFs ) If the big size and pricing is no issue than I'll agree that it would be perfect for a lot of things and I suspect the 800 series cards are HDMI 2.0 compatible and with a GTX880 version that is in that new Asus, you're getting the most powerful NVidia card mobile for a year. It'll probably cost around $2,500.


For something much smaller, this one seams like a good recommendation.
http://www.microcenter.com/product/421115/N56JR-MH71_156_Laptop_Computer_-_Black_Aluminum


It's true that if you wait a bit, they'll be other laptops with GTX800 series cards but any current new laptop (That isn't defective) that has an i7 chip and a dedicated NVidia card will be more than enough for simple 1080 60p editing that will allow you to use some effects while still being fluid on the timeline.
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coolscan  /t/1521221/1080p60-editing-hardware#post_24455044


I would suggest one of the ASUS ROG G750 Series Notebooks.


Either the G750JX-DB71 or the G750JH-DB71, or wait for the new upgrade models which are just around the corner, like the Asus ROG G750JZ with NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 880M GPU ..................


17.3" Matte Screen

RAM 16 GB DDR3 up to 32GB. More RAM is very important for editing speed.

256GB SSD or 128GBx2 SSD in RAID 0 + 1TB HDD (swap the HDD with a faster one. According to spec the Notebook HDD is only 5400rpm. which is too slow for video)

Intel® Thunderbolt™ technology + USB 3.0 for use with external archival storage.


Very Quiet and solid Laptop.
I have been using a ASUS ROG G75VW-DS72 for editing and like it a lot. I would buy the same thing again, if need be. As Paulo points out, It is big. But, with a laptop, that means the screen and keyboard are big enough to accommodate video editing. I consider it to be a portable "work station".


The price is high, but not compared to Apple laptops equipped for editing. If I spec'd out a desktop with the the same components as my ROG ASUS, I think I could have saved around $500. I needed the portability, so it was worth it. If you price "professional portable workstations" from HP or specialty laptop builders, the price is far higher than the ROG line.


As a bonus, mine came with a Blu-Ray burner that has been useful for video.


Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for all the responses and recommendations.


@Mark - Good advice re screen, I have not actually thought much about it, simply wanted FHD (1920x1080); as far as I understand though cetain parameters (brightness, saturation) can be adjusted, so I wonder how exactly I could find the right one? Apple's retina is very well known, my wife uses MacBook Pro, my duaghter McBook Air, I like the colors but they both complain that they get easily tired when working for a longer time. And I hate the OS and dislike the hype Apple has here in China, want to be different...


@Paulo - yes, he connected the laptop via cable and it worked very well, internet was fast, all drivers showed as being the most recent versions. And he still could not connect it to the wireless internet. In the meantime it came out that Chinese internet providers limits the number of devices that can be connected - wirelessly or with a cable - to one modem/line to 5. I have already applied to get the number increased to 10, should happen in a week or so. BTW when we tried to connect the unlucky HP only two cell phones were connected, nothing else, so we were below the limit.

@Toolscan, Paulo, Bill - ROG 750 looks like a very powerfull device but is beyond what I decided to spend on the PC - not to mention these machines cost at least 30-40% more in China than in the US...
(and I guess they are all made here). Paulo's recommendation looks just right to me re price and specifications - for what I understand N56 has a better GPU (GTX760M, 2G, DDR5) than N550 (which uses GT750, 4G, DDR3). The CPU, RAM, screen are indentical, cost is about the same here (around US$1500), so I think I will choose it.


Thanks again to all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Y510 on sale in China is about USD1400 (or more - depending whether it has BR drive or just DVD). The problem is it has GT755, which is - as I was explained - a trimmed version of GT750. This is here in China, I'm sure Lenovo takes better care of its customers overseas, so the GUP is probably better. Interesting, many of my Chinese friends here buy their Lenovo laptops in the US.


I bought ASUS N56 yesterday, like it a lot so far, much better quality than HP I had for a short while earlier.


Now if I had normal access to Youtube and Vimeo I'd be a happy chap!...
Another wall to break through.
 
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