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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received my three 1099 kits last week and am going to start my build (weather permitting) this weekend. Going for a Paradigm Monitor series look on the 1099s, made from BB with a dark mahogany stain, and white cloth speaker grill. I am also making a matching set of smaller (12" Titanic MK 4) ported subs. These will make up my 3.2 living room set-up.

For my future basement set-up, I am building a set of MartyCubes with the SI HT 15". For those I am hoping to go for a Kef R-Series look made from MDF in a gloss white finish.

For my parents I am building a set of small (10" Titanic MK 3) down firing sealed sub. Those will be satin white with 500W plate amps.

This is my first speaker build so it seems like a lot, but I am hoping it is a lot of fun as well.

Also big thanks to Tux and Erich for designing and making the 1099 available, as well as Donny and LTD02 for all there work on the MartyCube.

And first up is the 1099 crossover...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looks like you've got it to me. That's quite an interesting template you printed out. How'd you do that?
Good to hear I don't have to change anything, thanks for looking it over Tux.

I layed out the parts on a sheet of blank paper, drew the connections, and took a picture of that. Then using photoshop converted my not so clean pen lines to the ones shown in the picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The main reason I laid it out like that is because I will be attempting to make my own PCBs, and to do that I will need to print out the traces.
It's supposed to rain here, again, but I am hoping by the end of the week to be done those. I don't feel like trying, for the first time, to etch boards inside.
 

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The main reason I laid it out like that is because I will be attempting to make my own PCBs, and to do that I will need to print out the traces.
It's supposed to rain here, again, but I am hoping by the end of the week to be done those. I don't feel like trying, for the first time, to etch boards inside.
Are you attempting the laser printer, clothes iron and muriatic acid method for etching the PCBs? That's cool. Post pictures!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What my brother-in-law failed to mention is he had his graphic designer wife make the templates for him :eek:
She also did the ironing...

Are you attempting the laser printer, clothes iron and muriatic acid method for etching the PCBs? That's cool. Post pictures!
It actually worked fairly well. I will probably have to put a couple of wire jumpers on it, and clean it a bit better, but learned a fair bit about what to do and not do. Going to bring my DMM home from work to check continuity before I solder, but drilled all my holes and laid everything out.
 

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She also did the ironing...



It actually worked fairly well. I will probably have to put a couple of wire jumpers on it, and clean it a bit better, but learned a fair bit about what to do and not do. Going to bring my DMM home from work to check continuity before I solder, but drilled all my holes and laid everything out.
Looks to me like you did pretty well for your first try! What I have always done after etching a board is to go over it lightly with some steel wool to shine it up and then tin all the traces with solder. Do small sections at a time so that you do not overheat and warp the board. What this does is increase the current capability by several times as well as protect the raw copper from corrosion.
 

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Looks to me like you did pretty well for your first try! What I have always done after etching a board is to go over it lightly with some steel wool to shine it up and then tin all the traces with solder. Do small sections at a time so that you do not overheat and warp the board. What this does is increase the current capability by several times as well as protect the raw copper from corrosion.
That's exactly what I was going to suggest too. In the industry, a basic board that is not going to be nickel and gold plated (or other type of plating) will have a thin layer of solder covering all of the copper to protect it. The resulting "plating" type is called HASL standing for Hot Air Solder Level. The boards are essentially immersed in liquid solder and then run through a conveyor of some type that uses a high pressure, high heat "air knife" to remove the excess solder and leave a nice smooth coat on the traces and lands.
 

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She also did the ironing...
It actually worked fairly well. I will probably have to put a couple of wire jumpers on it, and clean it a bit better, but learned a fair bit about what to do and not do. Going to bring my DMM home from work to check continuity before I solder, but drilled all my holes and laid everything out.
You did a great job here! I seriously considered doing this for my 1099 crossover boards but didn't want the extra costs. One of the bigger projects in the electronics courses that I took in high school was to design and layout a circuit and then create a PWB in a similar fashion that you did. It's really cool stuff! :)
 

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She also did the ironing...

It actually worked fairly well. I will probably have to put a couple of wire jumpers on it, and clean it a bit better, but learned a fair bit about what to do and not do. Going to bring my DMM home from work to check continuity before I solder, but drilled all my holes and laid everything out.
Wow, those boards look great! I'm really looking forward to the rest of your build. I think the dark mahogany and white speaker grill is going to look really nice.

Looks to me like you did pretty well for your first try! What I have always done after etching a board is to go over it lightly with some steel wool to shine it up and then tin all the traces with solder. Do small sections at a time so that you do not overheat and warp the board. What this does is increase the current capability by several times as well as protect the raw copper from corrosion.
You did a great job here! I seriously considered doing this for my 1099 crossover boards but didn't want the extra costs. One of the bigger projects in the electronics courses that I took in high school was to design and layout a circuit and then create a PWB in a similar fashion that you did. It's really cool stuff! :)
How about a circuit board lacquer spray? How well do those work? You don't get the increased current as with tinning the traces like beefbuzz suggests but spraying the boards sounds fast and easy.
 

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How about a circuit board lacquer spray? How well do those work? You don't get the increased current as with tinning the traces like beefbuzz suggests but spraying the boards sounds fast and easy.
For the purpose of just preventing the copper from oxidizing further, I think that would be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Looks to me like you did pretty well for your first try! What I have always done after etching a board is to go over it lightly with some steel wool to shine it up and then tin all the traces with solder. Do small sections at a time so that you do not overheat and warp the board. What this does is increase the current capability by several times as well as protect the raw copper from corrosion.
Thanks. I completely forgot I had to tin the traces, thanks for pointing that out. I got them tinned last week and one of them didn't make it, one long stretch seems to be messed up. So going to make one the old fashioned way this weekend.

It seems like it has been raining for a week, and when it isn't raining I seem to be busy, but yesterday my brother and I had a spare couple of hours and started on the MartyCubes. Got both of them to the same point, before he had to go. Hoping to finish the Cubes and start the 1099s early next week.
 

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