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I need to hook up 2 Epik Empire subs to the single low level sub out of a Pioneer Elite SC-37 for a large theater (120 seats)


Subs are 75' and 120' away - after routing the cables. Any issues (or recommendations for 1)splitting the signal with a y cable, and 2)sending it 120 feet?


My plan is to use top quality cables - such as blue jeans cable here:

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/subwoofer/index.htm


Alternatively would I want to consider an active or amplified option for this?


Thanks!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by darqice /forum/post/19513066


I need to hook up 2 Epik Empire subs to the single low level sub out of a Pioneer Elite SC-37 for a large theater (120 seats)


Subs are 75' and 120' away - after routing the cables. Any issues (or recommendations for 1)splitting the signal with a y cable, and 2)sending it 120 feet?


My plan is to use top quality cables - such as blue jeans cable here:

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/subwoofer/index.htm


Alternatively would I want to consider an active or amplified option for this?


Thanks!

I would probably look into R6 coaxial cable. The type that cable companies use for their long runs. You would then just put coax to RCA adaptors at each end. You just don't want to have to buy 500 feet of it.


R6 can go hundreds of feet with a bandwith of 3 megahertz.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyboy /forum/post/19513865


I would probably look into R6 coaxial cable. The type that cable companies use for their long runs. You would then just put coax to RCA adaptors at each end. You just don't want to have to buy 500 feet of it.


R6 can go hundreds of feet with a bandwith of 3 megahertz.

Not a bad sounding idea. RG6 might be overkill though, and a bit rigid, particularly with quad shielding. Plain RG59 might suffice and offer some more flexibility for an easier installation. Oh, and it'd be cheaper too.
 

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XLR cables. They are made for long runs. You can put XLR to RCA cables at the end.


Keep in mind, the XLR cables have male at one end and female at another. So, you can connect one xlr cable to another to get desired length. These cables are meant for long runs, so that would be a good bet. Monoprice has them for $30 for 100 ft length.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by adude /forum/post/19514816


XLR cables. They are made for long runs. You can put XLR to RCA cables at the end.


Keep in mind, the XLR cables have male at one end and female at another. So, you can connect one xlr cable to another to get desired length. These cables are meant for long runs, so that would be a good bet. Monoprice has them for $30 for 100 ft length.

Do XLR cables maintain any advantage over RCA cables when the source and destination don't have the appropriate balanced outputs/inputs? I would think using RCA adapters would defeat any advantage to XLR.


Anyone care to comment?
 

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The moment you put an unbalanced adapter/cable at one end, it becomes unbalanced. XLR has 3 pins. When used with RCA, only pin 2 carries the signal. Pin 1 and 3 are combined and connected to the ground. There are some active converted which take the balanced signal and convert to RCA but that adds more circuitry and beats the purpose.


But the XLR cables are built better compared to RCA ones. And they are very much flexible compared to coaxial cables. Also, I am not sure, but read somewhere that coaxial cables are designed for carrying RF signal which is 40K Hz. The subwoofer signal is 0 to 200 Hz. People use the coaxial cable for subwoofer, so it should be alright, I guess.
 
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