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I plan on getting a Denon 2310 av receiver, I might try install a pc fan to help ventilate the cabinet, Is the 12v trigger output from the amp strong enough to power a fan or is this a bad idea ?
 

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I think you mean the switched outlets as the 12v trigger simply "triggers" a component to turn on rather than actually powering it. Yes, the switched outlets can power the fan, although keep in mind that these outlets remain ON all the time when HDMI Control is set to YES (ie when HDMI audio/video pass through is wanted while the AVR is in Standby mode).


For more information on the 2310, read the first post in the 2310/890 Owner's thread .
 

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I would seriously investigate taking the back off your cabinet or making the air circulation holes much, much larger before I would want to run a fan. Fans make too much noise no matter how quiet they are.
 

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The best way to do this is use the switched 115v outlet on the back of the 2310. Use a small variable voltage (DC) wall wart to power the fan. It will come on and shut off with the AVR.

A low RPM (less than 1500 rpm) 120mm 12vdc fan run at less than 12vdc will be nearly inaudible in a dead silent room. Even during quiet music and movie passages you won't hear it - and it does not take much to move the air enough to keep things cool.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knucklehead90 /forum/post/18160693


The best way to do this is use the switched 115v outlet on the back of the 2310. Use a small variable voltage (DC) wall wart to power the fan. It will come on and shut off with the AVR.

A low RPM (less than 1500 rpm) 120mm 12vdc fan run at less than 12vdc will be nearly inaudible in a dead silent room. Even during quiet music and movie passages you won't hear it - and it does not take much to move the air enough to keep things cool.

I run several 120mm fans in my computer at low voltage to keep the whole thing whisper quiet. It's an accomplishment since the thing is 3 ft from my head sitting on my desk to show off the fancy guts.


Yate Loon has always made the best quiet fans that I have used. At 12v, they measure 22db. Even at this level, they may well be below your room's ambient noise levels. At 5v they go even quieter - likely below your room's ambient noise level.


I think there might be quieter fans out there, but at $3.99, the Yate Loons are the peak of price/performance. Many similarly quiet fans run near $20.00 a pop. And many of those are based off of the Yate Loon design...

Silent PC Review has some great tests of silent fans. I followed their recommendations years ago and have been 100% satisfied.


At 5v, the Nexus/Yate Loon fans best the highly-touted Noctua fans everyone champions with higher CFM at the lower speed. And as previously stated - the Yate Loons can still be had for $3.99. For me, that's a winner.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjuch /forum/post/18159614


I plan on getting a Denon 2310 av receiver, I might try install a pc fan to help ventilate the cabinet, Is the 12v trigger output from the amp strong enough to power a fan or is this a bad idea ?

The 12v trigger power is only intended for signaling. If you pull enough current through it to operate a fan, you may overload that circuit and damage the receiver.


A 12V AC-DC adapter, either in a switched outlet on the receiver or in a "smart" power strip that activates when the receiver is turned on, is how you want to power your fan.
 
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