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I was just trying to figure out what the best resolution setting for a xbox 360 is for a tv who's native res is 1366x768. When you hook a 360 up to vga the closest resolution is 1360x768. If you set the 360 to 1360 the TV is going to have to upscale. Is it better to set the resolution to a higher one on the 360 (1080) and let the TV downscale?
 

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There's no simple answer here. Everyone's AV setup is different, so it depends on a lot of different factors. Even if your display is 768p, its scaler could vary quite a bit in quality, and overscan or underscan can change things up a bit if you don't have 1:1 pixel mapping.


The best answer I can give you is to trust your own eyes. Test out a bunch of different settings and see what you see.


As for my setup, I've also got a 768p display, but I'm connected via HDMI (passed through my AVR). My set (a 32" Aquos) does a much better job of downscaling 1080i than upscaling 720p, so I have it at 1080i in the 360's display settings.
 

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If your TV has a 1:1 mode then set it to 1360*768 and be done, if not you will have to do some visual testing like confidenceman said.
 

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I have a 32 inch Sony S2010 LCD TV that is 1366x768 and I set my XBOX 360 for 720p output. If your TV is 1366x768 it will usually call itself 720p Native, even though it is not exactly (minimal difference...1280x720 = 720p).


A general rule of thumb is that you want your TV to have to work less to produce a picture. 720p output will do this for you in this situation.


- if you set the xbox to 1080p it will not work at all...

- if you set the xbox to 1080i your TV will have to reduce it from 1920x1080 down to 1366x768...and it will have to change it from Interlaced to Progressive Scan.

- if you set the xbox for 720p your TV will only have to change it from 1280x720 up to 1366x768, and it won't have to change it from (I) Interlaced to (P) Progressive Scan...


Use your judgement as to what looks best of course, because there are many other factors than just this for the best picture...


I chose option 3 for my best setup
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acurariders1325 /forum/post/13018433


I have a Westing House HDTV, here is the link, westinghousedigital.com/details.aspx?itemnum=18 . I am using a VGA connection and what do you guys think would be a good setting to set the "Display Settings" too? The TV has a native resolution of 1366x768. Thanks.

Most TVs, but not all, that have a native resolution of 1366 x 768, will do 1:1 pixel mapping with VGA connection, if you set the xbox to 1360 x 768. Then there is no scaling at all, since the TV simply leaves 3 black pixels at the beginning and end of each line. Most people don't even notice the 3 pixel window box.


P.J.
 

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Westies (and most other HDTVs that support WXGA over VGA) run native, 1-t0-1 at 1360x768. You get a couple black pixel columns on either side, nothing anybody can notice. The way I hear it, the VGA spec requires horizontal resolutions that are multiples of 8; 1360 is--1366 isn't.


Choosing a resolution for WXGA displays really depends on the individual set and the viewer's eyes.

- First rule is you don't want overscan. If your display has no zero-overscan option everything else is irrelevant; the 5-10% overscan means nothing you do is going to make much difference. Some games could even lose part of the HUD.

- Second rule is that if the set has limited zero-overscan, go with whatever port and resolution gets you zero-overscan. Some folks find stretched XGA to be preferable to overscanned 720. Your eyes, your call.

- Third rule, if you have a choice of zero-overscan ports, is that HDMI > DVI > VGA > component > everything else.

- Fourth rule, none of the above matters as much as going from SD to HD or properly calibrating your set; its all about the last 5% or so image quality so don't sweat it overmuch.


Best thing to do is spend as much time as possible gaming instead of fretting the specs and settings.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirecTVHDFan /forum/post/13018219


A general rule of thumb is that you want your TV to have to work less to produce a picture. 720p output will do this for you in this situation.

Not to be difficult, but this isn't true. It's no more "work" for your scaler to downscale 1080i to 768p or for it to upscale 720p to 768p. The difference in number is meaningless. Processing is processing, and it depends wholly on the scaling tech of your display and whatever else your video signal is passing through (like an AVR).


As I said above, the more correct rule of thumb for most scalers is that they tend to do a better job of downscaling than upscaling. But the differences can be rather marginal, so again, trust your own eyes. The difference on my set, though, is pretty substantial and easily visible even to untrained eyes. If you can't tell a difference, then don't worry about it.

Quote:
Use your judgement as to what looks best of course, because there are many other factors than just this for the best picture...

Yes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman /forum/post/13019199


It's no more "work" for your scaler to downscale 1080i to 768p or for it to upscale 720p to 768p.

wrong.


de-interlacing AND then downscaling is much more "work" than just upscaling, and will produce a worse picture
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by formulanerd /forum/post/13019510


wrong.


de-interlacing AND then downscaling is much more "work" than just upscaling, and will produce a worse picture

hmm...not necessarily. It's possible for a set to deinterlace simply by discarding half the lines of 1080i and then up/down scale 1920 x 540 to 1280 x 720. I'm not saying it's a good way to do it, but I wouldn't be at all surprised if some sets do it that way. That method neatly side-steps the need for sophisticated deinterlacing, at the expense of vertical resolution.


P.J.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by formulanerd /forum/post/13019510


wrong.


de-interlacing AND then downscaling is much more "work" than just upscaling, and will produce a worse picture

I'd also happily invite you over to my place to show you exactly how stark the difference is. Trust me, the PQ is substantially better when I have my set downscale and deinterlace rather than upscale.


Granted, it's wholly dependent on your set's processing abilities (as I've said above), but unless you've got a pretty good display (I'd call mine low- to mid-range at best, plus it's over a year old), this will generally be the case across the board.


EDIT: Here's a recent thread detailing some of the ins and outs of scaling for a 768p set:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=974423
 

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maybe some sets will handle it differently, but if you look at what is actually going on, you're taking 720p(or 640p) rendered, up(down)scaling AND interlacing to 1080i (i'm actually not sure what process the 360 uses to accomplish this), de-interlacing to 540p and then "downscaling" (actually upscaling) to 768p


rather than outputting 720p and upscaling to 768p.


but with all things, i guess its mostly situation/equipment dependant.


so i'll say as many others have said before.... try them both, see what YOU like better.
 

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Always set your TV to whatever looks best not whatever should look best. Trust your eyes. Only then can you be truly satisfied.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valence01 /forum/post/13018517


Most TVs, but not all, that have a native resolution of 1366 x 768, will do 1:1 pixel mapping with VGA connection, if you set the xbox to 1360 x 768. Then there is no scaling at all, since the TV simply leaves 3 black pixels at the beginning and end of each line. Most people don't even notice the 3 pixel window box.

How about 1:1 over HDMI?


My set (Olevia 237t) has a 1:1 mode for all inputs. When I set my PC (hooked up via VGA) to 1360x768 and set the TV to 1:1 I get what you are describing above.


When I set my 360 (hooked up via HDMI) to 1360x768 and set the TV to 1:1 I get a "windowed" image - about 1/2" to 3/4" of black space on all sides.


The TV reports both inputs as 768p, but obviously there's something going on that's different between the PC / VGA and 360 / HDMI combos that should be putting out the same resolution.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caswell /forum/post/13023437


How about 1:1 over HDMI?


My set (Olevia 237t) has a 1:1 mode for all inputs. When I set my PC (hooked up via VGA) to 1360x768 and set the TV to 1:1 I get what you are describing above.


When I set my 360 (hooked up via HDMI) to 1360x768 and set the TV to 1:1 I get a "windowed" image - about 1/2" to 3/4" of black space on all sides.


The TV reports both inputs as 768p, but obviously there's something going on that's different between the PC / VGA and 360 / HDMI combos that should be putting out the same resolution.

Underscan like you're encountering is seen with some sets, but it's more common to encounter over-scan, if 1:1 is not achieved. My set (Sceptre 37" 1080P) overscans native resolution input on HDMI using RGB or YCbCr colorspace, but does 1:1 if I force "DVI" mode which only accepts RGB colorspace. I don't know why it cares, but it does what it does. Unfortunately, my Samsung blu-ray player cannot be made to output RGB colorspace. So, I can't use "DVI" mode for that.


I suppose I should ask what happens with the 360 input to the Olevia via HDMI, if you don't select 1:1 mode?


P.J.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by darklordjames /forum/post/13018892


"HDMI > DVI"


Um, same thing. HDMI isn't greater than DVI.

Really? I didn't realize that the DVI interface was capable of passing audio signals...


Now I think I know what you meant to say but methinks you probably should have worded it a bit differently, so as to not unintentionally imply that both HDMI and DVI do the same thing.
 

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Out of 2 1366x768 tv sets I have had, both performed better with 1080i content than 720p content, ironically. These sets are labeled as 720p sets, yet 1080i keeps more detail, and their de-interlacing is perfect (aside from upscaling sd-dvds to 1080i on the 360).


The right de-interlacing is capturing both fields and producing one whole image, then downscaling. It looks MUCH better than just getting a 1280x720 progressive image that upscales.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by toneman /forum/post/13027595


Really? I didn't realize that the DVI interface was capable of passing audio signals...


Now I think I know what you meant to say but methinks you probably should have worded it a bit differently, so as to not unintentionally imply that both HDMI and DVI do the same thing.

actually the interface IS capable of passing audio signals, but you probably wont find a port that will accept them.
 
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