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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I am trying to make up my mind between NEC LT 150 OR

INFOCUS LP 350 which both have 4:3 aspect ratios.


My question is regarding watching the DVD movies & 1080i.


What kind of projection screen should I buy?


In other words what happens to the black borders in these

projectors as far as the screens are concerned?


This might be a silly question, but I don't know how to ask

otherwise!!!!!!!!!


Thanks.

 

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I have the LP350 projector and I have a 4:3 screen. I think that I am in the minority here. From what I read, most people have the 16:9 screen. Now I am sure that there are many arguments both ways. I will tell you mine and I am sure that others will chime in with theirs.


I chose my 4:3 electric screen after looking at both and could not find a reason for me to buy the 16:9 screen. My screen is 80" wide and about 60" high. If I were to go with a 16:9 screen it would be 80" wide and 45" high I think. When I watch a movie other that 4:3 I just don't roll the screen down as far. Many people complain about the black bars on a 4:3 screen, but after sampling both types, I noticed that you still get black bars on the 16:9 screen. This is because, as I understand it, not many movies are shot in the 16:9 ratio. Now what really would have bugged me is the huge vertical bars I would get if I wanted to watch a 4:3 show on the 16:9 screen. Not to mention how much smaller I would have to make the image. Plus I would have to manually zoom out the projector and aim again. Now I just let the screen down all the way.


I can see going with a 16:9 screen for a fixed installation or if you are building cabinets around the screen area.
 

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Dear cmd1997:


I myself am ordering a Perm-Wall 16x9 fixed 58x104, which seems right for me at a viewing distance of 18 feet. On a screen this size and format 4:3 DVD's (like pre-Cinemascope classics) look big and exciting at 58x78, even with the bars on either side, while widescreen movies are engulfing. You might also consider the 2-to-1 "rule" (e.g., sit 16' away from an 8' wide screen). Bottom line: screen shape is not as important as width. To object is to get sucked into the picture.


BTW, you might also want to think about the DLP halo effect. On LCD 4:3 projectors I have seen, the black bars above and below a 16x9 screen are dim and do not distract me. With the LP 350 I had, halo was pretty pronounced. Many DLP owners end up using black felt for masking. I will control halo with dark wine velour drapes and adjustable valances just outside the black screen border, which will also make my fixed screen environment look like a movie theater. It seems that this masking might be more cumbersome with a 4:3 screen, especially if you have to roll it down and then attach masking material afterwards. (Which CAN be done and IS done all the time.)


Just a few things to consider.


Mike


P.S. Have you surfed around the SCREENS FORUM? Lots of info there, and oodles of ingenuity in solving projection problems.
 

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You have to decide if you want your picture width to remain constant, or your picture height, as you switch from one format to the other. I'm getting a 120" 4:3 screen, because my projector only has a manual zoom, and even that isn't enough to compensate for a change from 4:3 to 16:9.

Without a _very_ flexible automatic zoom (33% minimum), you're going to be stuck with severe 'screen overscan' when viewing 4:3 material if you spec a 16:9 screen. This is even more critical for a pj like the LT150 with no zoom at all. You'd be constantly moving the pj back and forth to fit your screen height. Of course, if you decide not to use full panel for 4:3, or use an anamorphic lens, all of that goes out the window...




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I own the LP350 and chose a 16x9 screen.


Why? Because when I'm watching a movie, or the superbowl in HDTV, I want BIG. I didn't want a smaller image inside a 4:3 screen.


Take the following example:


My current 16x9 screen is 110" diag (54x96). I view from 12' away. When masking the sides, the 4:3 image is a still pretty large 90" (54x72) for a 12' viewing distance.


To get the equivalent 16:9 image on a 4:3 screen, I would need a 72x96 screen. Too big for the viewing distance.


I could have gone with a 90" 4:3 screen, then cast the 16:9 image inside it at 83" diag (40x72). Too small for my viewing distance.


One other thing to account for is masking. Masking around the image is definitely worthwhile and helps the overall look of the image. I solved my masking problem with the Stewart ultimate 4-way. If I hadn't gone that way, I would have still purchased a 16:9 screen and use curtains to provide verical masking for 4:3 material.


Best of luck,


--Les
 

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I am thinking of getting both. A fixed 16:9 and a 4:3 pull down. My 16:9 greyhawk is on order, but it seems logical to also have a cheaper 4:3 for occassional viewing. Any thoughts on that.
 

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If you are viewing 4:3 sources that are generally of lower quality/resolution than 16:9 sources, then wouldn't it be better to display 4:3 on a 16:9 screen? Center speaker placement is another factor to consider.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by arrow:
I own the LP350 and chose a 16x9 screen.


Why? Because when I'm watching a movie, or the superbowl in HDTV, I want BIG. I didn't want a smaller image inside a 4:3 screen.


Take the following example:


My current 16x9 screen is 110" diag (54x96). I view from 12' away. When masking the sides, the 4:3 image is a still pretty large 90" (54x72) for a 12' viewing distance.


To get the equivalent 16:9 image on a 4:3 screen, I would need a 72x96 screen. Too big for the viewing distance.


I could have gone with a 90" 4:3 screen, then cast the 16:9 image inside it at 83" diag (40x72). Too small for my viewing distance.


One other thing to account for is masking. Masking around the image is definitely worthwhile and helps the overall look of the image. I solved my masking problem with the Stewart ultimate 4-way. If I hadn't gone that way, I would have still purchased a 16:9 screen and use curtains to provide verical masking for 4:3 material.


Best of luck,


--Les
Les,

Is there different size for a 16:9 screen? I mean I've seen different arnamophic movies with different aspect ratio . Some has bigger black bar on top&bottom of the screen, some has smaller one on my 16:9 Mitsu RPTV. Which screen do I need to get for my dedicated HT room with a front projector(don't know which one to get yet, may be LT150 or LP530???) to avoid the top&bottom bar if I don't have horizontal mask? Thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Signal:
If you are viewing 4:3 sources that are generally of lower quality/resolution than 16:9 sources, then wouldn't it be better to display 4:3 on a 16:9 screen? Center speaker placement is another factor to consider.
Of course, that would be ideal, but without a very flexible automatic zoom, or an anamorphic lens, you won't be able to 'shrink' a 4:3 image to fit inside a 16:9 panel without moving/fiddling with your pj...


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Darren Rogers


Please stop reading my signature....

NOW!!!

I really mean it, you're starting to get on my nerves!

Listen, I'm not kidding here, if you keep reading, you're gonna regret it!

Look into my eyes, and do not doubt my reslove - if you persist, you will be taught a lesson you will not forget!
 

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I use a 4:3 screen because of its flexibility. I developed a very simple, inexpensive masking system which "floats" the masking at the top and bottom to whatever height you want it! The sides, which of course, remain a constant width, are bordered with full length curtains. Doesn't matter what aspect ratio you have - the image is perfectly bordered by black - improves perceived contract and blacks.


Cheers,


Grant
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Jonmx:
I am thinking of getting both. A fixed 16:9 and a 4:3 pull down. My 16:9 greyhawk is on order, but it seems logical to also have a cheaper 4:3 for occassional viewing. Any thoughts on that.
You have to make sure the two screens are in approximately the same plane or you'll have focusing issues.


Bryan



[This message has been edited by bryan_chow (edited 07-18-2001).]
 

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One thing I've tried is running my cable channels through the DTC100. The picture quality doesn't justify increasing the vertical size, and I don't have to zoom. The downside is that the DTC100 put grey (not black) bars on the sides, which is kind of annoying.



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I just ordered/mounted a 16:9 Da-Lite HC (.8 gain) screen (92" diagonal) *before* buying a projector (although I know it will probably be a DLP). My rationale for 16:9 (instead of 4:3) was very simple: I can't imagine any 4:3 sources that look good enough to "blow up" any bigger than my direct-view TV. All that leaves are DVD's/LD's (which are all widescreen) and HDTV--all geared towards 16:9.
 

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I have a Da Lite High Power 4:3 pull down screen mounted in front of a custome made 16:9 screen. The High Power is OK for cable, but I find it adds graininess and lowers black level.


So for DVDs, I simply raise the High Power and watch on my matte 16:9 screen. I'm in the process of working out masking details for the 16:9, but it works very well as is.


Steve


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hi steve,


i'm surprised that no one has mentioned that the grey bars can be set to black

in the service menu of the dtc100 (press INFO and down arrow on the unit, then goto to the monitor settings)


Quote:
Originally posted by steve5097:
One thing I've tried is running my cable channels through the DTC100. The picture quality doesn't justify increasing the vertical size, and I don't have to zoom. The downside is that the DTC100 put grey (not black) bars on the sides, which is kind of annoying.





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Quote:
Originally posted by tvuong:
Is there different size for a 16:9 screen? I mean I've seen different arnamophic movies with different aspect ratio . Some has bigger black bar on top&bottom of the screen, some has smaller one on my 16:9 Mitsu RPTV. Which screen do I need to get for my dedicated HT room with a front projector(don't know which one to get yet, may be LT150 or LP530???) to avoid the top&bottom bar if I don't have horizontal mask? Thanks.
Yes there are different widescreen aspect ratios. The ones I have seen are 1.78 (16:9), 1.85, 2.35.


If you get a 1.78 screen then the 1.85 and 2.35 images will appear within the 1.78 screen with blackbars at the top and bottom.


I mask out the black bars on the top and bottom because I purchased the Stewart Ultimate 4-way. But it is an expensive option.


If I wanted to save money, then I would have gone with 1.78 and masked the sides with curtain for 4:3 viewing.


--Les
 

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Actually, my favorite aspect ratio for a screen is 2.35:1. Once I made a screen of blockout fabric in this ratio (about 50"x118") and projected 2.35:1 movies so that the black bars disappeared above and below the border. (1.85:1 movies left white screen on both sides, which I ignored because I was just experimenting,and I didn't care about 4:3 material, which is usually too poor to watch on an FP anyway.) If your projector is bright enough to expand the image to 120" wide or more, and you don't mind masking down to 1.85:1, a 2.35:1, viewed that big, is THRILLING.


Remember also that there are quite a few European and Australian movies shot in 1.66:1 as well as a few Hollywood movies in 2.20:1 (West Side Story, I believe, is one) and as wide as around 2.75:1 (Brigadoon). I am ordering a 58x104 screen (16x9) because I want the HiPower fabric and don't want to pay for a custom screen; otherwise I would have them make me one 58x136. I still may price the custom job, for the heck of it.


Mike
 
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