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New to projectors & have never seen a 16 x 9 screen set up.

 

I watch mostly Direct tv , a lot of older dvd's to- & am wondering how 4:3 shows would display on a 16 x 9 screen?

Can you adjust the projector to have the show fill the screen? Or is it partly filled?

 

I enjoy HD programming to,

 

If I bought a 1070, wondering how it displays. Thank You
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dodgetruck  /t/1523452/16-x-9-questions#post_24507188


New to projectors & have never seen a 16 x 9 screen set up.

 

I watch mostly Direct tv , a lot of older dvd's to- & am wondering how 4:3 shows would display on a 16 x 9 screen?

Can you adjust the projector to have the show fill the screen? Or is it partly filled?

The W1070 (as I'm sure with most other projectors) has a dedicated 'Aspect Ratio' button on the remote which allows you to do either: in '4:3' mode, it'll display the image in the center (at full height) in its original ratio; whilst in 'Wide' mode it'll also stretch it to full-width.


Choice is yours!


As above, any modern projector would likely be the same.
 

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Just restating the above...


You typically have a choice on how to view things. The 'aspect ratio' button on your projector remote and/or DirecTV remote handles this.


With DirecTV, the output resolution is often fixed at 1080i resolution. If this is the case, then the DirecTV receiver handles aspect ratio controls.


With Blu-ray/DVD, there may be settings inside the player as well to handle aspect ratio controls.


Quite often you can't use the aspect ratio control button of the projector to change to something different.


But, the source typically does have some set of controls.


If watching 4:3 material, the three most common ways to view it are:

Normal: 4:3 material appears in the middle of the screen. There are black bars on the left/right of the image. Everything is the proper size/shape.

Stretch: 4:3 material is evenly stretched across the 16:9 screen. Everything is 'fat'. This is evenly applied across the image and gives you are larger image, but everything is distorted evenly.

Stadium Stretch (or some other similar name): 4:3 material is very slightly zoomed in upon. The top and bottom of the 4:3 image is slightly cut off. The edges are stretched more than the center. Since most action takes place in the center, it has less distortion and stretching than the sides. If someone walks from the left side of the screen to the right side of the screen, they start out fat, get skinnier towards the center, then get fat again towards the edges.


I watch almost no 4:3 content, but when I do, I leave it on 'normal' and live with the black bars. Most traditionalists will argue strongly that this is exactly what you should do.


This is also the general rule when watching 2.35 content on a 16:9 (1.78) screen.
 
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