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I've read something about burn-in when watching 4x3 programming on a 16x9 set, but I can't find anything on this subject when doing search on the forums, Can someone who knows speak about this?

I'm either going to purchase a 4x3 set and watch 16x9 enhanced( this can be done with the Toshiba36hfx73 without the bars found on the sony sets )or a 16x9 that allows one to view a 4x3 program without the risk of burn-in.......can anyone suggest a set like this?

Thanks in advance,

Peggy
 

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Most people that own a 16:9 Widescreen TV will zoom/stretch the 4:3 broadcasts to fill the screen. Some TV's do this better than others, and the Toshiba's are known for their better stretch/zoom modes.
 

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Yeah the widescreen sets allow you to use various stretch or zoom modes for 4:3 material or you can view it pillar-boxed with gray/black side bars. Direct-view CRTs have such a low chance of burnin - don't worry about it. You should be watching more widescreen programming than old 4:3 programming anyway. the 4:3 sets don't have any stretch/zoom options so they would be a bigger burn-in candidate with widescreen letterboxed material if you worry so much about burn-in.
 

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Thumperboy: Many think that when it comes to rear projection CRT TVs that Hitachi has some of the best stretch modes. Who do you think makes the best stretch modes when it comes to widescreen direct-view CRTs?
 

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If there is something being broadcast in 4x3 and you absolutley want 'no' distortion, watch it - it won't hurt the t.v. (just don't watch 4x3 24/7). By the look of the more recent SD broadcasts , however, they all seem to be letterboxing themselves lately so I would probably zoom & stretch and call it a day.


Anyone else notice how much widescreen SD broadcasts there are? Even the commercials are close to 16:9 lately.


Glad I have the 34xbr910 on it's way.


Only question I have is, how do you compensate on the 16:9 screen so you can see the news scrolls on the bottom of Fox News or MSNBC?
 

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Actually, I think some of the best stretch modes I've seen have been on Philips TV's. I don't actually own one, but I think most of their TV's have at least 5 modes, and some have up to 7!!!
 

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Quote:
the 4:3 sets don't have any stretch/zoom options so they would be a bigger burn-in candidate with widescreen letterboxed material if you worry so much about burn-in.
This information is incorrect. The JVC 4:3 HDTV that I own has the following stretch modes: Anamorphic 16:9 DVD Mode, Regular, Cinema Stretch and HD Panorama. Thus, I could stretch a 16:9 HD signal if I wanted to do (negating OAR), but more usefully I can stretch a 4:3 boxed signal hence filling the screen. Some people seem to believe that the only option for avoiding the dreaded 4:3 box is switching over to S video - but that is not necessarily true with the newest 4:3 HDTV's. A 4:3 HDTV is the choice for many gamers b/c the vast majority of games are 480p. There are only a handful of games that support the higher resolutions. Additionally, where I live I'm only receiving four HD channels from Comcast (Abc, 2x INHD and HBO). The local NBC affiliate hasn't upgraded their hardware, and CBS has pulled their HD programming from Comcast because of a revenue dispute between Emmis broadcasting and Comcast (No HD Superbowl grrr!).
 

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Thats good to hear JVC is doing that for their 4:3 HD models, that would help make a 4:3 HD actually useful. But the major makers like Sony, Toshiba, and Panasonic don't do that on their 4:3 HD sets so I can't recommend them.


And yes I totally agree there is so much widescreen programming now, even on analog channels they are letterboxing 16:9 programs a lot now. So for me a widescreen 16:9 HDTV is the only way to go!
 

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Guys I don't think I have to remind you how many thousands of hours that are on my RCA F38310. I can tell you I have *never* watched a 4:3 or vertical stretch program in DVD, only the *stretch* mode! Unlike a former AVS member that did burn his F38310 via channel lable, I have no burns at all, even after nearly 3 years of ownership of a dealers floor model. I did however see the dealer take it out of the shipping crate, he set it up and after 2 weeks of running; it was delivered to me on May 7, 2001. The picture seen is as good as the day it was delivered, I did my homework and kept it out of a burnin situation by watching it stretched. It's in that way right now, and sometimes I see no fat faces at all I am so used to it.



Proof it's in the archive read only section around September of 2001.

Your mission is if you don't believe me go look it up, and have a nice weekend. :)
 

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Bionic Manaus: You seem quite happy with your RCA F38310. I many times get raked over the coals here for advocating that some manufacturer produce another 38-inch widescreen. Do you think anyone will? What do you think it would cost? Do you think people would buy it? If you were advising a company that wanted to produce a 38-inch widescreen direct-view CRT what advice would you give them? What changes if any would you make to your set if given the chance? Most honored to speak to such a legend as you!
 

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Jet,


Actually, there already is a 38" Widescreen TV, the Loewe Aconda from Germany. Loewe is using the RCA 38" Tube, but that's the end of the comparison. You will pay for it, but if a VERY high quality 38" Tube is what you're looking for, then you've found it w/the Loewe.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ThumperBoy
Yeah the widescreen sets allow you to use various stretch or zoom modes for 4:3 material or you can view it pillar-boxed with gray/black side bars. Direct-view CRTs have such a low chance of burnin - don't worry about it. You should be watching more widescreen programming than old 4:3 programming anyway. the 4:3 sets don't have any stretch/zoom options so they would be a bigger burn-in candidate with widescreen letterboxed material if you worry so much about burn-in.


This is incorrect info. When is the last time (if any) anyone has heard of a burn-in on a 4:3 HDTV??? With the 16:9 anamorphic squeeze & verticle compression of the new 4:3 HDTV's, the video scan lines on appear in the letterboxed area providing for better resolution. There are no scan lines in the black bars, hence no burn-in.
 

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Its the lack of lighted phosphors in the black bar area that causes uneven phosphor wear (burn-in) so the verticle squeeze doesn't prevent it! But in any case burn-in on any CRTs nowadays is very rare.
 
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