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I'm looking for a primmer on the advantages/disadvantages of buying a projector with the 16x9 chip, or a 4x3 chip. At the moment, I'm torn between the new Sharp and the new Hatichi.


I assume that the lenses such as the Panamorph and the ISOII perform the task of squeezing a 4x3 image into 16x9 or thereabouts. So then, if you have a high res 4x3 projector and use one of these lenses it effectively condenses the vertical resolution of the 4x3 image? Which, I assume would give you very vertical resolution, however when watching 16x9 source material wouldn't you have to feed the projector with a vertically pulled and horizontally streched 4x3 image, so that it will look good through the lense.


Maybe, I've got this all wrong. I'd just like to understand how people are using these lenses practically in their set-ups. Do you have to take the lense off and on, when viewing different aspect ratios? Is that why the 16x9 projectors are favorable?


Perhaps there's already an elementary discussion of this somewhere else on the Forum. If so, I apologize, but I didn't find it.


Thanks,

John
 

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Dont take my word on it, but this is what I understand how it works. My example is based on the JVC Dila


With the Lens, you would you use full 1365x1024 resolution. The image is processed so that the lens stretches back to its proper form.


If you dont use the lens, you dont use the full 1365x1024 resolution, but a portion of it.


The ability to use the full resolution processes a better picture.


The answer to your question is yes. If you are watching 4x3 or 16x9, the image needs to be stretched or reverse stretched in order for it to come out correct when it goes through the lens.


Some of the projectors like the Dwin DLP can do this process and most of the scalers including the Rock +, Leeza, NRS and Vigatec can accomplish this.
 

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You're both correct in how an anamorphic lens works. The Pannie, anyway. ;)


"Do you have to take the lense off and on, when viewing different aspect ratios? Is that why the 16x9 projectors are favorable?"


John, I currently don't remove the lens for anything except 4:3 material. I'm hoping that when I get some time, I can do a stretch in the Dilard software program to allow the lens to remain in place full time.


I wouldn't quite say that 16:9 projectors are favorable just yet. Maybe in the future. Currently the DILA projectors will resolve all that Hi Def has to offer, and that's worth a lot, IMO.


There's been a huge amount of discussion on this in the last year. Search "Panamorph".


Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the good advice!


I had always assumed that 16:9 projector and screen was the best way to go. However, the projectercentral article makes a lot of good points.


It seems that going with a high res 4:3 projector (like the new Hitachi) and the addition of a Panamorphic lens would give you the best of all possible worlds. Using the Panamorph on a projector with 1024 vertical, it seems to me, would give you a finer image than the native 16:9 DLPs are offering. Current DLPs are 1280x720, yet a Panamorphed Hitachi would give you the full 1365x1024 in a 16:9 format. Plus you could remove the lens to watch 4:3 stuff at the full, unsqueezed resolution.


I don't see any real disadvantages to this approach. Are there?


- John
 

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The only disadvantage is there will be some barrel distortion using an addon lens. Most people find the added detail more than makes up for this, and it is barely noticable if your screen is masked.
 
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