AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got one over the weekend. Have it in the attic and am getting very good signal levels about 7 miles West of

NYC (75+ as registered by DTC100), from both ESB and

WTC.


It is very small, very light, decent looking. I have it

hanging off 2 1-1/2" nails.


Another plus - as it uses 300 Ohm cable, it becomes very easy to run the flat cable in the house. I used "Arrow" hand stapler and was done ( about 60 feet worth of cable)

in about 5 minutes. The cable ( $3 for 40' @ RatShack) is

peachy in color, so it goes nice with any light paint http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif



SSMA http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I have one, too. I am about 10 miles north of you, about 15 miles from the city. I have the radio shack pre-amp as well, but I don't think I need it.


My signal still has drop outs though, so I don't watch it much. Sometimes, the HD signal, such as leno, comes in better than the analog.


I have a 20 dollar home depot GE rotor. Let me tell you, the signal is very sensitive to aiming. One notch on the rotator makes a big difference.


John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
While the 300 ohm twinlead is superficially more convenient to install, it's also M*U*C*H more susceptible to RF interference. You CAN minimize the current twinlead's tendency to pick up interference by TWISTING the twinlead. Figure two complete turns per running foot. Straight 300 ohm twinlead acts like an antenna, itself, with virtually no rejection of unwanted frequencies or multipath. You'd both do much better running 75 ohm RG-6 coax from your receivers to your antennas. You'd need to either have a technician modify the antennas by desoldering the captive 300 ohm twinlead (or do it yourself if you're versed in the manly art of soldering), and solder the short "pigtail" of 300 ohm twinlead that's attached to a matching balun transformer usually used with outdoor antennas. Once connected with 75 ohm RG-6 coax, expect a ten point increase in signal strength on a DTC100 with this modification.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by rashid11:
however I think/find that digital channels (such as used

for DTV) and the DTV's modulation technique are much less susceptible to interference.
?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
Check out the boston tower forum, you'll see that just about everyone not using a roof-mounted antenna has either the RS double bowtie or the silver sensor (or both). I use both and find the bowtie to have more gain but less multipath rejection. I now use the bowtie all the time.


jake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Sorry, maybe I'm missing something, but...what's the RS part number for the antenna mentioned in the title of this thread?


Bob


------------------
Evil Gemstar: All your guide are belong to us!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
15-623; $15.99
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
I went to a lot of trouble putting up a VHF/UHF on my roof. Normally it works fine but the higher the channel the more likely it is to drop out in windy conditions. I have the problem even when it is not raining.


Just for kicks, I tried the above mentioned bow-tie. 3 of my 4 channels and the only ones that fail for me are UHF. It works somewhat better than the outdoor antenna, but is still suceptible to whether.


I don't know what to make of the experience, but thought the 4 or 8 bay bow-ties might work even better. I have inserted 5 3db attenuators and still had signal lock on all channels in good weather. Would the larger bow-ties only get me more signal, which I don't need?



------------------

-CB-


Interested in Atlanta specific issues?
Atlanta HDTV & DTV Group
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top