AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay so I watch most 4:3 video in stretch mode and even when the need arises I have grey bars on the side of TV to watch in OAR.


But a lot of the DVDs I own are filmed in the scope ratio of 2.35:1 meaning I have black bars along the top and bottom of the screen. Considering most movies are 2+hrs in length is there a danger in burning the black bars into my screen.


I mean during any other time I wouldn't have a static image on my screen for 2 hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Quote:
But a lot of the DVDs I own are filmed in the scope ratio of 2.35:1 meaning I have black bars along the top and bottom of the screen. Considering most movies are 2+hrs in length is there a danger in burning the black bars into my screen
This is a very important question and is particularly relevant to those who use a HD RPTV primarily for DVD viewing. The bars can certainly cause screen burnin and thus prolonged use of films with an aspect ratio greater than 1.78:1 could cause this. A person recommended that I use a stretch mode in order to get rid of the bars, but I went to 16:9 TV in order to better display widescreen movies. This to me would be the same as P&S...not an option. Another bit of advice that I was given was to simply mix it up; try not to only watch films that show a set of horizontal bars. Perhaps some 1.33:1 material or films in which the screen is completely filled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a Toshiba 42H82. Contrast and Brightnes set reasonably. 45/40 I think.


The thing is I own about 200 DVDs and about 50 of those are 2:35:1 aspect ratio. That means that for literally hours my TV is displaying black bars along the top and bottom.


I make sure to use appropriate Brightness/contrast settings. I use stretch mode as much as possible. I never allow static logos on the screen and when nessesary I watch 4:3 images with grey bars on the sides.


Problem is what can I do about this.


BTW I certainly don't want to watch Gladiator stretch out to fill the screen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Quote:
BTW I certainly don't want to watch Gladiator stretch out to fill the screen.
I completely agree...I hate to stretch anything. All I can tell you is to try and mix it up. If you frequently view 2.35:1 films, then you will have to be cautious. As I understand it, the burnin problem will only result(on a correctly adjusted set) after consistently viewing static images over a period of time. If my understanding is correct(please someone inform me otherwise), then as long as you occasionally view other material you should be fine. In other words, you aren't going to get burnin from watching a range of aspect ratios as long as the area of the horizontal letterbox is frequently filled- i.e. 16x9 material, 4x3 material stretched or otherwise, etc. This is what I have been told and it seems to work. Perhaps some others will post on this issue.


version, thanks for starting this thread as it is a very important concern
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
748 Posts
The most reasonable sounding advice I ever got on this was from the guy that ISF'd my set. Basically, if you watch a two hour dvd with black bars, let the set run something full screen for another two hours after you're done watching the movie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,771 Posts
No need for that. If you had the settings ibn torch mode, maybe, but no way if it is properly adgusted. I have been watching about 40 to 50% 2.35:1 material on my Panasonic 47" 16X9 HDTV for almost a year now and have not even a trace of burnin. I avoid the gray bar mode at all costs, since the gray bars are more like bright white (because the gray scale is way too hot and the set needs to be ISF'd).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Don't worry too much. I watched 4 2.35:1 movies in a row on my Uncle's 55 inch 4x3 HDTV and none of the movies burned in at all. The images were very sharp and had just the right brighteness and contrast. I did not see one hint of burn in at all.


I hear ya about gray bars. I've seen RPTVs at Sears that have burn in from letterbox material, but it was the top and bottom that was burned. Maybe they can reverse that effect if they made the bars black, then it'll even out. And almost EVERY TV I see in the store has the contrast on FULL BLAST. I turn it down. I guess one use of gray bars is that if the middle area is burning in when using black bars, you can then switch to gray bars to start evening it out when the burnin starts taking effect. I'm sure with the right settings, burnin ain't really much of an issue. I ain't worried about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Quote:
No need for that. If you had the settings ibn torch mode, maybe, but no way if it is properly adgusted. I have been watching about 40 to 50% 2.35:1 material on my Panasonic 47" 16X9 HDTV for almost a year now and have not even a trace of burnin.
I have never experienced burnin nor has anyone I know so I am curious about your response. The odds of burnin should be the same for all areas of the screen. Shoudn't this mean that with proper set-up-i.e. no torch settings- even watching 1.33:1 material would be fine. Please let me know because I have been avoiding watching alot of 4:3 material for fear of burnin. Is it right to assume that this should not be a problem if the set is properly adjusted?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,723 Posts
Greetings


I have never seen any tv suffer from w/s burn in when the contrast was set up correctly.


It is simply not an issue ...


Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I thought about this for a safety measure buring myself a 16x9 VCD or DVD with the center blacked out and the bars at the top and the bottom running some miscellaneous video. This could very easily be done in Premiere or some other video editing program. Then I could just put this disc on every once and a while to compensate for the 2.35:1 video I watch.


Then I thought the allignment would have to be pretty precise or a I might have fine lines running along the screen where the two video sources converged.


It's probably safer and easier to just make sure I keep settings reasonable and mix up the video content on the screen regularly.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top