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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!


My carpenter will begin to work next monday and he knows nothing about soundproofing. So I have to act as his ''boss''. Really a case here of ''in the land of the blind, the man with one eye is king''...



I have two question (see ???????? on image):


1. How do I ''finish'' the drywall at the door frame junction? Should I put two small gypsums strip at right angle that would close the gap or just continue the door frame to the drywall?


2. Should I butt the first Gypsum (with a 1/8'' to 1/4'' gap for sealant) to the 2'' x 4'' (like it is on image) or should I align it with the first gypsum at right angle?


Not sure I'm clear (sure I'm not
- hope image helps...), but THANKS anyway!


[/URL] [/IMG]
 

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Your diagram is missing the king stud and trimmer. Bring both layers of drywall flush with the inside of the trimmer, and bottom of the header. If you are using a standard pre-hung door you will most likely have to add an extension to the jamb. The part you have labeled "door frame" is the door jamb.


I can't tell from your diagram does the door swing in or out? Right hand or left hand door?
 

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You don't need anything at the edge of the ceiling where you marked your ????. You wouldn't be able to anyway.


You do have the alternating layers of drywall correct. In those places, you want a small gap so each can move independently. Fill it with caulk. That will allow it to move and still seal it. When I say a small gap, I'm talking maybe 1/8". It's easy to do the initial caulking by doing a bead on the existing layer and then bringing the perpendicular layer up to it. Then just add another bead to help fill in.


Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK, here's a modified picture + 2 pictures of the actual door (the door will be either replaced or soundproofed -- suggestions welcomed
).


By the way, perhaps it's not clear, but it's a view from top, representing two walls, one with doors:


[/URL] [/IMG]



Quote:
Originally Posted by r8ingbull /forum/post/12988760


Your diagram is missing the king stud and trimmer. Bring both layers of drywall flush with the inside of the trimmer, and bottom of the header. If you are using a standard pre-hung door you will most likely have to add an extension to the jamb. The part you have labeled "door frame" is the door jamb.


I can't tell from your diagram does the door swing in or out? Right hand or left hand door?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMGJMGJMG /forum/post/12989664


OK, the stud closest to the door is the trimmer, the one running from bottom plate to top plate is the king. The drywall should be cut flush with the inside of trimmer.


It appears your door needs to be re-hung. The hinges need to be proud of the drywall. The way you have it now, the door will hit on the corner of extension jamb. The door should always be set with any extensions on the opposite side from the hinges/plates.

http://www.do-it-yourself-help.com/i...s_windows.html


How thick will the finished wall be after two layers of drywall, hat channel, framing, drywall, etc...???
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks! Really a door-101 course for me! I THINK I understand. I will post a new image (with measures) later to ''prove'' it
...


JMG

Quote:
Originally Posted by r8ingbull /forum/post/12992005


OK, the stud closest to the door is the trimmer, the one running from bottom plate to top plate is the king. The drywall should be cut flush with the inside of trimmer.


It appears your door needs to be re-hung. The hinges need to be proud of the drywall. The way you have it now, the door will hit on the corner of extension jamb. The door should always be set with any extensions on the opposite side from the hinges/plates.

http://www.do-it-yourself-help.com/i...s_windows.html


How thick will the finished wall be after two layers of drywall, hat channel, framing, drywall, etc...???
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, so. The wall as it is now with drywall removed:

[/URL] [/IMG]


The wall when finished. Double drywall with Green GLue on RC with clips. Double doors for better isolation. Of course a new, longer jamb will be required (thanks R8ingbull!!
):


[/URL] [/IMG]
 

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Are you using interior or exterior doors? You will probably run into clearance issues with the door handles. Also exterior doors will have clearance issues with the thresholds.
 

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Really excellent insights there R8. That's very helpful
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK, it's not to scale... but I hope you get the idea. There is enough place for the handles IF they are at different height. I found a pair of doors identical to mine, without handle holes. I'll drill the hole at required height for a correct clearance of the handles (see side view).


Is this OK? I would not be surprised if it was not...



Thanks!


JMG


[/URL] [/IMG]

Quote:
Originally Posted by r8ingbull /forum/post/12998588


Are you using interior or exterior doors? You will probably run into clearance issues with the door handles. Also exterior doors will have clearance issues with the thresholds.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMGJMGJMG /forum/post/13000494


OK, it's not to scale... but I hope you get the idea. There is enough place for the handles IF they are at different height. I found a pair of doors identical to mine, without handle holes. I'll drill the hole at required height for a correct clearance of the handles (see side view).


Is this OK? I would not be surprised if it was not...

You could do it that way. If I was trimming out a medium-high end house, I don't think that would go over well with the homeowner, I have a feeling it might look kinda cheap and rigged up...


Another thing to consider, the existing door jamb is probably 4-1/2" wide. Once it gets moved out to the existing drywall, it will only contact 1-1/4" of stud. Since the casing can't be nailed into the trimmer/king it is not going to add much rigidity to the jamb. That door is going to be a lot of weight on the end of a fairly long lever.


What size door is it? Painted or stained trim? Rough opening size?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Door = 30 x 80 (x 2, double doors). Painted. Opening: 61 3/4 X 80 7/8.


Also, I see that on the right side, the gap between the jamb and the stud is not the same at the bottom and at the top (very uneven). I understand that if shims are used, it's because the space MUST be adjusted, but so big a difference, is it normal?


If I read you correctly, it would be preferable to have just one door, opening outside the room, right?


I must say that I find it quite extraordinary to have help on a forum like that. THanks! I'm afraid I'm abusing your help here.


[/URL] [/IMG]

Quote:
Originally Posted by r8ingbull /forum/post/13001606


You could do it that way. If I was trimming out a medium-high end house, I don't think that would go over well with the homeowner, I have a feeling it might look kinda cheap and rigged up...


Another thing to consider, the existing door jamb is probably 4-1/2" wide. Once it gets moved out to the existing drywall, it will only contact 1-1/4" of stud. Since the casing can't be nailed into the trimmer/king it is not going to add much rigidity to the jamb. That door is going to be a lot of weight on the end of a fairly long lever.


What size door is it? Painted or stained trim? Rough opening size?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMGJMGJMG /forum/post/13004001


Door = 30 x 80 (x 2, double doors). Painted. Opening: 61 3/4 X 80 7/8.


Also, I see that on the right side, the gap between the jamb and the stud is not the same at the bottom and at the top (very uneven). I understand that if shims are used, it's because the space MUST be adjusted, but so big a difference, is it normal?


If I read you correctly, it would be preferable to have just one door, opening outside the room, right?


I must say that I find it quite extraordinary to have help on a forum like that. THanks! I'm afraid I'm abusing your help here.

No problem on the help. The gap from top to bottom is normal. The framing is never perfect (that's why they are called rough carpenters). The finish carpenter is expected to deal with that.


Doors always swing into the room, unless you have some kind of strange clearance issue. I don't really deal or understand with soundproofing, so the one door/two doors isn't in my area. From a purely aesthetic standpoint, one high quality french door is better.


Any finish carpenter should be able to hang 4 doors in that opening if that's what you want. Or are you doing the finish yourself?


I can give you a step by step breakdown if you want it....
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by r8ingbull /forum/post/12988760


Your diagram is missing the king stud and trimmer. Bring both layers of drywall flush with the inside of the trimmer, and bottom of the header. If you are using a standard pre-hung door you will most likely have to add an extension to the jamb. The part you have labeled "door frame" is the door jamb.


I can't tell from your diagram does the door swing in or out? Right hand or left hand door?

Good thread. I'll be running into this issue soon on my HT. Can someone explain as mentioned above, how to "add an extension to the jamb"? How and where would this extension be attached?
 

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In the diagram you might be better off if you break the jam (small gap). For my doors I ripped the jam down on each so that once installed the exterior door is secured with the house framing and the interior is secured to the theater framing.


I should have a picture soon as I'm doing the drywall now... now off to ice my knees.
 

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I didn't like the two piece look of door jamb extensions, so I ripped my own jambs from some finger-joined pine stock on a table saw. That way I was able to make it exactly as wide as I wanted
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Banshee /forum/post/13004533


Good thread. I'll be running into this issue soon on my HT. Can someone explain as mentioned above, how to "add an extension to the jamb"? How and where would this extension be attached?

The extension is just a strip of wood to make the jamb the same thickness as the wall. They are usually used when using 5/8" drywall or 2x6 walls. Generally you use a piece of 5/8"x? stock (? = however much your situation calls for). The jamb should be the same width as the wall from drywall-drywall + 1/16". The extension is mounted with glue and finish nails.


Door jambs are almost always 3/4" thick. I use 5/8" for the extension. This provides a reveal along the edge. It is VERY difficult to accurately line up two pieces of 3/4" material on the jobsite, with one of them already installed. Leaving 1/8" reveal just makes it look nicer.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by two-rocks /forum/post/13005172


In the diagram you might be better off if you break the jam (small gap). For my doors I ripped the jam down on each so that once installed the exterior door is secured with the house framing and the interior is secured to the theater framing.


I should have a picture soon as I'm doing the drywall now... now off to ice my knees.

Are you using an exterior door and an interior door? If so they have different jambs to begin with. Exterior doors use 6/4 jambs, interior use 3/4 (usually).


If you are usuing two interior doors, your solution is a good one, IF you have theater framing. His diagram only has the hat channel and drywall to mount the second door jamb.


I'd like to see a picture of your door set-up. I run into this every once in awhile. Sometimes when new framing meets old framing I have to use a 8+" jamb. I would like to see how two 4" jambs with a caulk line looks. 8" wide stock is pricey and not very movement stable.
 

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He may not know about soundproofing, he should know about hanging and trimming out a door and windows, etc.
 
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