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Hello AVS forum members, long time lurker first time poster!


I recently started building a better A/V system and finally made my first purchase: a Lexicon RX-7 amplifier to couple with an old Yamaha HTR-5860 AVR. Much to my chagrin, I found out that the power cord is designed to fit into a 20 amp socket after hooking everything else up and getting excited.


I don't know the first thing about electric circuits - if you plug it in and the lights come on then that means the power isn't out - that's the extent of my knowledge. I did some reading and it seems I need to have a 20 amp circuit in order to plug this thing in and not set the entire apartment complex on fire - yes, I live in an apartment.


I checked my breaker box and all of the switches say 20 or higher - no 15's. If the wiring was done with the appropriate gauge to support the 20 amp breakers in the box and they only installed the 15 amp outlets throughout, can I use something like a "Furman ADP-1520 Power Adapter Cord, 20 Amp Female Socket to 15 Amp Male" Plug ? (I can't post links yet, sorry)


Let me know if this post isn't even in the right area.


Thanks for reading!
 

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Well, if you plugged it into a 15 amp outlet, it might just pop the breaker due to inrush current, or demand under heavy loads into low impedances.
 

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I read about someone plugging in an Adcom that needed 20 amps into a 15 amp circuit. It would pop the breaker on turn-on, due to inrush current.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcsoul /forum/post/19546602


That Lexicon has a 15a switched breaker built into it the back of it though LOL.

Sounds stupid but there are lots of ways to create a breaker/fuse and many have completely different properties.


To put it another way a mains breaker rated at 15A doesn't actually trip when current passes 15A and what it trips at varies based on how long the current lasts and even continuous current of say 16A may or may not trip it. In the same light a AFIC breaker rated at 15A will trip in lots of situations that a generic 15A breaker doesn't care about.


Same can be said of the breaker built into the amp (who knows what type it is).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xianthax /forum/post/19546736


Sounds stupid but there are lots of ways to create a breaker/fuse and many have completely different properties.


To put it another way a mains breaker rated at 15A doesn't actually trip when current passes 15A and what it trips at varies based on how long the current lasts and even continuous current of say 16A may or may not trip it. In the same light a AFIC breaker rated at 15A will trip in lots of situations that a generic 15A breaker doesn't care about.


Same can be said of the breaker built into the amp (who knows what type it is).

This guy has 20a breakers not 15a, the plugs are "15a" but that is a continuous rating. He may pop a breaker under certain conditions, like if the outlet shares a circuit with a major appliance that is also on during power on or major musical peaks. Other than that this whole scenario of purchasing the furman plug adapter sounds legit and low risk to me.
 

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If you already have 20 amp circuits but the outlets are only 15 amp all you have to do is to replace the 15 amp outlet ("wall socket" to some) with a 20 amp outlet. Cost is about five bucks or less. Just look at the prong layout for the difference. No need for any overpriced "audiophile grade" adaptors. BTDT!


Cheers,

SB
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotcheckBilly /forum/post/19549346


If you already have 20 amp circuits but the outlets are only 15 amp all you have to do is to replace the 15 amp outlet ("wall socket" to some) with a 20 amp outlet. Cost is about five bucks or less. Just look at the prong layout for the difference. No need for any overpriced "audiophile grade" adaptors. BTDT!


Cheers,

SB

Be sure, and I mean sure, that there's 12 gauge wire going to that outlet, and 12 gauge wire to the circuit breaker. COPPER wire (not aluminum). The wire size is the determining factor in how much current a residential circuit can safely handle.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopclod /forum/post/19549433


Be sure, and I mean sure, that there's 12 gauge wire going to that outlet, and 12 gauge wire to the circuit breaker.

Yea, I agree. Check the wire gauge.


Something does not compute. Sounds to me like maybe somebody replaced the breakers with 20A when they should be 15.


15A outlets aren't designed to work with 12 gauge wire. They'd definitely have to be side-wired (to the screws) because 12 gauge wouldn't fit into the back-wiring holes at all.


Sounds to me like you've got a bigger issue than that 20A power cord.
 
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