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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read a lot of information about recent advancements in LCD technology in preparation of buying my first HDTV Flatpanel, but I have not seen a lot of information on the moving picture resolutions for the 2010 models. I searched the forum and saw some information on 2008 models and 2009 models, but nothing describing more recent sets.


Moving picture resolution is one of the more important statistics to me that I look for. I remember seeing some numbers for specific Sony or Samsang models having 500 - 600 moving lines of resolution. How has this technology progressed recently in the LCD industry? Does anyone know where I can look to get a clear cut view of the statistics?
 

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You mean Motion Resolution?


Sony HX909 has 1080 lines Motion Resolution when using MotionFlow Clear1,it has better motion than the Sony XBR8(1080 lines Motion Resolution when using MotionFlow Clear),only top of the line Sony's have a MotionFlow Clear option,HX909 has the best motion on the (LCd) market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I found a thread a for it submitted in 2008 in this forum so the term could have changed. Motion Resolution is what I am speaking of. Basicly the fact that all 1080P hdtv's have 1080 x 1900 resolution on a static image, but while the image is moving this resolution can be diminished.


To my understanding it has to do with the pixel refresh rate and the processing hardware of the TV. My friend has a Sharp Aquos TV and the picture turns into a juddery and blurry mess during fast scenes, and I want to make sure my TV does not do this.


Many HDTVs are labeled as 120Hz or 240Hz but cannot really display this refresh rate. I can't find any reviews that standardize this measurement. I am mostly looking at the Vizio M550NV at the current moment, but can not find any information on it.
 

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You will find 1080 lines Motion Resolution on some top of the line models $$$$ ( Samsung b8500 Video Processing http://www.practical-home-theater-gu...-led-tv-3.html ).


Sony uses Backlight Scanning to achieve this http://www.presentationtek.com/2010/...ing-backlight/ ,i use Backlight Scanning (MotionFlow Clear) all the time on my 120Hz XBR8.


240Hz http://reviews.cnet.com/240hz-lcd-tv...-need-to-know/


Its your first HD TV,Take also a look at Plasma-tech http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1296524 .
 

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I really doubt any source, including Blu-Ray, has full 1920x 1080 resolution during movement. Then there is the fact your eye/brain can't see it. It's why (digital) TV works.
 

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LCD TVs are fixed pixel digital displays. The native resolution of the2010 models are either 1920x1080(rowsXcolumns) 720p(1280x7200 or 1366x768(also sold as 720P models. If you send them video content either video or film based in another reasolution the TV will scale(add or deleted rows and columns of content in to display a full screen image at it's native resolution.

All current 120 hz LCD TV models have motion compensation logic to enable you add frames between existing frames to reduce motion blur or that allow you to display each frame 5 times to eliminate what is know as 3:2 Judder when watching film based content.

None of the TV user manuals that I have read provide an intelligent description of how to set their motion compensation options to ge the visual effect you want.

It is much harder to reduce motion problems when using a 60Hz LCD TV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for your help. I know Plasmas have a better resistance to motion resolution, but I want to use this set for half gaming and half movies so I am concerned with burn in.


Basically I have about $1300 and want to get the best bang for my buck. Right now the M550NV looks like the best value for the money spent and it is a edge lit LED LCD / 55 inch screen / and has a 120Hz refresh rate so hopefully that will cut down on the blurring that is associated with LCDs and fast motion.


@walford

I appreciate your help but I don't think we are speaking of the same things. I am referring to what this article is talking about: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10020262-1.html
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill /forum/post/0


I really doubt any source, including Blu-Ray, has full 1920x 1080 resolution during movement. Then there is the fact your eye/brain can't see it. It's why (digital) TV works.

I've actually seen a thread with report that current LCD are reaching in excess of 800 motion resolution vs around 400 few years back. Plasma has always been high on motion resolution with kuro almost 1080
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I found some more information on this topic on HD Guru:


"Standard LCDs incorporate a 60 Hz refresh rate. This produces motion resolution of around 320 lines (per picture height) out of a possible1080 lines. 120 Hz refresh ups the motion resolution to around 600 lines, while 240 Hz kicks it up to 900 lines or higher.


Once the refresh rate is increased to 120Hz or higher, a number of image artifacts appear (see related story here link). In addition, test material reveals unwanted artifacts present in all types of 120, 240 Hz LCD HDTV."


This is located here:
http://hdguru.com/how-to-pick-the-right-hdtv/2630/
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by walford /forum/post/19657060


It sure would be nice to know what "Motion resolution" is and how you measure it and why it is only dependent on the native refresh rate of the display.

A few days ago i took a look at the end-credits of a movie and compared Motionflow ''off'' (300/400 lines Motion Resolution)and Motionflow ''clear''(more than 1000 lines Motion Resolution) on my 120Hz xbr8 ,in ''off'' mode motion was weak and stuttery,in ''clear'' mode motion was strong and stable.
 

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There's an article somewhere on CNET about motion resolution and they also mention the motion resolution statistics in their reviews.


I think their logic is that while it might not make a huge difference on a day-to day basis, it's still a quantifiable measure of the TV's capability.
 

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So motion resolution is a measure of the maximum number of frames of frame interpoated content you can optain based on the settings of the motion flow/compensation settings settings available in a TV and of coure the higher natiive refresh rate of the TV the higher the "Motion Resolution" capable.
 
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