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I was going to run slides for 100 hours, but looks like the family can't wait, haha. I'll still run them to add time, but it's going to be a mixed break-in.


So my question is regarding extremely transparent logos like Bravo channel -- is that ok during the first 100 hours? Seems like they've done a good enough job letting color pass through, but would rather be safe during this period.


I'll probably plug dnice's settings in afterwards, regardless -- seems like there's a green push even with THX (same as my old S1 panny). Would be a shame to never give this set a full calibration, but that's coming at 300+.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by david3powell  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2250#post_24011683


Hopefully I'm asking it correctly. Do I need to input the Dnice settings for each input. One when I watch cable, then one when I watch Blu ray etc.? I thought once I loaded the settings once on the Custom settings it will carry over to all the inputs.

Thanks

If you want to have the settings on other inputs, there is a part of the picture mode that lets you copy the to one or all inputs and to custom, cinema etc as you wish. That makes life easiser. Please note though, when you do copy the settings fro the different inputs are linked so if you make minor changes to one the other will also change. I noticed this with the pixel orbiter settings.

J
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big J  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015168


Please note though, when you do copy the settings fro the different inputs are linked so if you make minor changes to one the other will also change. I noticed this with the pixel orbiter settings.

J

Negative. The settings that are copied are completely independent. What you noticed is that the Pixel Orbiter settings and everything else in that part of the menu is global and not copied. It's only the Basic and Pro settings that are copied, the "Basic" settings being the top level of the menu (Brightness, Contrast, etc) and the "Pro settings" being the submenu that contains CMS, white balance, gamma, etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big J  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015198


OK, my bad. :-(

J

Fuggedaboutit.
I was going to post that by "global", I meant shared by all the modes on a given input, with each input being independent, but Pixel Orbiter really does appear to be global across all inputs. I always turned it off ("Auto") so never experimented with it before now. Other things like 1080p Pixel Direct, Overscan, etc are input-specific and not copied with the settings.
 

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I was planning on leaving the pixel orbiter on for the antenna input and off for Blu-ray. I'd rather have off for everything than on for every input.

J
 

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First, big apology for posting yet another slide question, I couldn't find an answer after searching. I have an p50st60 coming and plan on getting it professionally calibrated after using the slides to prep. Consensus for those going this route seems to be a 300+/- hour run of the slides before the calibration. My question is, do I stop the slides at hour 100 and input D-Nice's reference settings then continue slide for 200 more hours? Or just run all the way through to 300? Mainly wondering if having the contrast at 100 for the whole 300 is a concern? Cheers
 

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You can start watching normal content at 100 hours.. I personally would still fill the entire screen and be wary of static logos/graphics from 100 hours to 200-300 hours... after that I'd always be wary of static logos / graphics.


I do suggest you get 300 hours on it before having your Calibrator come out.
 

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if you had panel aging settings in, I'd tweak the settings from 100 hours onward.. then once you get your Professional Calibration you will use those settings of course.
 

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For those that are having trouble understanding the methodology used by D-Nice maybe this will help.


1) TVs of a specific model produce pictures that look close to the same when they leave the assembly line. In particular, the grayscale is the same. This is the basic foundation of the method. Before a TV is boxed for shipping, each individual set has its specific internal service menu values of low and high white balance controls (CUTs and DRVs) adjusted to make the picture's grayscale look as much the same as each other set. This means that, although the screen display looks the same, each set will have unique absolute values of low and high white balance settings.


2) The greatest change in the phosphors occurs during the first few hundred hours of use. The phosphors follow the same rate of change for each TV of the same model. The laws of physics apply here. The change follows an inverse exponential function. However, each color phosphor (red, green, and blue) does change with a different rate.




3) The phosphors are stabilized by employing the break-in images to accelerate the aging process. Then the TV is calibrated using scientific/engineering measuring hardware. One object is to make the grayscale conform to the international industry standard (specification) for the "color" of gray. This is the color temperature. -- specifically D65. Google it.


4) After the calibration, the calibrator notes the changes that were required to achieve compliance with the standard. These changes are reflected in the posted user menu settings.


5) It follows that any TV of the same model -- after bring subjected to exactly the same aging technique and after applying the setting values -- will exhibit a grayscale very close to the actual calibrated TV.


6) The same logic holds for the color and gamma settings.



Larry
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2250_50#post_24015520



2) The greatest change in the phosphors occurs during the first few hundred hours of use. The phosphors follow the same rate of change for each TV of the same model. The laws of physics apply here. The change follows an inverse exponential function. However, each color phosphor (red, green, and blue) does change with a different rate.




3) The phosphors are stabilized by employing the break-in images to accelerate the aging process. Then the TV is calibrated using scientific/engineering measuring hardware. One object is to make the grayscale conform to the international industry standard (specification) for the "color" of gray. This is the color temperature. -- specifically D65. Google it.


Larry
Larry, thanks for you post. I'd like to add one item to it. For the ST60 model that D-Nice calibrated, he found that there was enough change in phosphors in the period between 100 and 300 hours to recommend holding off having a professional calibration done until after 300 hours.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015562


Larry, thanks for you post. I'd like to add one item to it. For the ST60 model that D-Nice calibrated, he found that there was enough change in phosphors in the period between 100 and 300 hours to recommend holding off having a professional calibration done until after 300 hours.

That is an important point.


I'll add another point. Over the past four or so years, the quality control seems to have slipped and it appears that the units coming off the assembly line are not as close to one another visually these days. So my item number one above may not be as true as it was in the past.


Larry
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2250_50#post_24015588

Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015562


Larry, thanks for you post. I'd like to add one item to it. For the ST60 model that D-Nice calibrated, he found that there was enough change in phosphors in the period between 100 and 300 hours to recommend holding off having a professional calibration done until after 300 hours.

That is an important point.


I'll add another point. Over the past four or so years, the quality control seems to have slipped and it appears that the units coming off the assembly line are not as close to one another visually these days. So my item number one above may not be as true as it was in the past.


Larry
Back in the days of the Pioneer Kuro, D-Nice maintained that the variance tolerance was 5% based on information from Pioneer. I don't recall him posting similar information for plasmas from other manufacturers. I've always assumed that the variance is greater.
 

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I just received delivery of 65VT60. I downloaded the D Nice setting to a USB key...then what do I do? I am confused on how to get the slides to run? I put key into a USB slot but nothing. Is there a way to select that key like on a PC?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015520


For those that are having trouble understanding the methodology used by D-Nice maybe this will help.


1) TVs of a specific model produce pictures that look close to the same when they leave the assembly line. In particular, the grayscale is the same. This is the basic foundation of the method. Before a TV is boxed for shipping, each individual set has its specific internal service menu values of low and high white balance controls (CUTs and DRVs) adjusted to make the picture's grayscale look as much the same as each other set. This means that, although the screen display looks the same, each set will have unique absolute values of low and high white balance settings.


2) The greatest change in the phosphors occurs during the first few hundred hours of use. The phosphors follow the same rate of change for each TV of the same model. The laws of physics apply here. The change follows an inverse exponential function. However, each color phosphor (red, green, and blue) does change with a different rate.




3) The phosphors are stabilized by employing the break-in images to accelerate the aging process. Then the TV is calibrated using scientific/engineering measuring hardware. One object is to make the grayscale conform to the international industry standard (specification) for the "color" of gray. This is the color temperature. -- specifically D65. Google it.


4) After the calibration, the calibrator notes the changes that were required to achieve compliance with the standard. These changes are reflected in the posted user menu settings.


5) It follows that any TV of the same model -- after bring subjected to exactly the same aging technique and after applying the setting values -- will exhibit a grayscale very close to the actual calibrated TV.


6) The same logic holds for the color and gamma settings.



Larry

Very helpful, thanks Larry. Would you possibly have a chart of how the phosphors age past the 300 hr. point?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2250#post_24015100


Are you asking about drift or the link to "Who or What is D-Nice?"

Drift. Larry's posted curve is a lot of help, but it only goes to 300 hrs.

I did understand that the phosphors and hence settings will drift worst early in the

life of the set, and why you might want to speed up that process if you wanted to

get a calibration done ASAP.

I just don't understand why you would want to run slides just to apply a certain

batch of settings, instead of simply applying the settings and going about using your tv.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fcb  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015630


Very helpful, thanks Larry. Would you possibly have a chart of how the phosphors age past the 300 hr. point?

If you imagine the curve going out to infinity it will fall on the x axis. That means that the change will be quite small beyond 300 hours. Small enough that another calibration may not be needed until many thousands of hours -- if at all.


Larry
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2280#post_24015644


If you imagine the curve going out to infinity it will fall on the x axis. That means that the change will be quite small beyond 300 hours. Small enough that another calibration may not be needed until many thousands of hours -- if at all.


Larry

Excellent. Thanks again.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fcb  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2250_50#post_24015643

Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits  /t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread/2250#post_24015100


Are you asking about drift or the link to "Who or What is D-Nice?"

Drift. Larry's posted curve is a lot of help, but it only goes to 300 hrs.

I did understand that the phosphors and hence settings will drift worst early in the

life of the set, and why you might want to speed up that process if you wanted to

get a calibration done ASAP.
I just don't understand why you would want to run slides just to apply a certain

batch of settings, instead of simply applying the settings and going about using your tv.
It's no more than a personal choice. What D-Nice probably doesn't want to happen is for people to use his settings, without following his procedure, and then taking it upon themselves to critique the settings. That probably explains a lot about why other top professionals don't want their customers to post settings derived from their work..
 
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