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Can someone clarify this for me?

No, they are not the same thing. The A-53 is the general purpose SOC (System On a Chip) that runs AndroidTV while the X-1 handles the display.
 
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Speaking of OLEDs, when I was TV shopping in 2018, I had a hard requirement that it had to be less than 44" wide, due to where I was wall mounting the TV.

I did not see any OLEDs which met this requirement, so I had to look at 48-51" TVs which did fit this requirement.

I see now there is a Sony A9S which is coming soon, a 47.6" OLED.

And LG has a 48CXPUB that's out now.

For those of you that have both this thread's Sony XBR900E, and an OLED, how is the motion blur?

This Sony TV is still a limited use TV, partly because it's upstairs.

But also, I think my plasma TV does a better job with motion blur, especially when it comes to sports. It's not bad with this Sony TV, but every now and then it is noticeable.
MY 65" 900E was excellent until the panel went bad. Sony allowed me to get a replacement (was a little out of warranty), but could only replace with a 950G. The 950G has been horrible. So bad, in fact, that I bought an A8G with every intention of selling off the 950G to recoup some of my cost for the OLED. The OLED was equally as bad with motion handling as the 950G, so it got boxed right back up and went back to BB the next day.

Disclaimer: I am very sensitive to motion issues on these TV's. My 940D continues to be a beautiful picture all around and my 49" 900E still is great as well. I -really- miss my 65" 900E...

There is a new firmware out for a 'sister' of the 950G that supposedly addresses the motion issues. But, since it isn't explicitly for the 950G set, I haven't installed it to try it out as there's "no way back" from bad firmware installs.
 

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The 900e has very nice images and true 120Hz refresh, which are the reasons I bought it.
I have managed to set the monitor to a 144 Hz refresh rate but only using 1080p resolution.
Using 1440p or 4K the maximum refresh rate is 60 Hz.
How come you say that it's a 120 Hz TV ?
 

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I have managed to set the monitor to a 144 Hz refresh rate but only using 1080p resolution.
Using 1440p or 4K the maximum refresh rate is 60 Ha.
How come you say that it's a 120 Hz TV ?

Because that's what the spec is. It's a 120Hz refreshed panel in hardware, not the "Motion Rate 120 Technology" lies Samsung tries to foist off on their customers by trying to make up for their inferior panels in software.

I have no idea how it works when driven by a computer video card because I don't use it that way. But on fast motion video content, the fact it's an actual 120Hz panel is obvious.
 

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Because that's what the spec is. It's a 120Hz refreshed panel in hardware, not the "Motion Rate 120 Technology" lies Samsung tries to foist off on their customers by trying to make up for their inferior panels in software.

I have no idea how it works when driven by a computer video card because I don't use it that way. But on fast motion video content, the fact it's an actual 120Hz panel is obvious.
OK, but if you try to see that fast motion video content on 1440p or 4K resolution, do you see the panel behaving as a 120 Hz monitor ?
According to TV's specs that's impossible.
 

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OK, but if you try to see that fast motion video content on 1440p or 4K resolution, do you see the panel behaving as a 120 Hz monitor ?
According to TV's specs that's impossible.

You are talking about when the set is driven by a computer video card. When driven by a video source, the maximum frame rate that 4K resolution currently achieves from any home-based video source (not a graphics card) is 60Hz. And that refers to the input, not the rate at which the internal electronics refreshes the panel. The two can be different.

Some high frame rate video sources do exist, one example being the 4K ride videos at theme parks and other venues for the public, which are often 120 Hz or even more. But those are not being displayed on consumer monitors, nor are those video sources available to home users in the form of streaming or disk playback.
 

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You are talking about when the set is driven by a computer video card. When driven by a video source, the maximum frame rate that 4K resolution currently achieves from any home-based video source (not a graphics card) is 60Hz. And that refers to the input, not the rate at which the internal electronics refreshes the panel. The two can be different.

Some high frame rate video sources do exist, one example being the 4K ride videos at theme parks and other venues for the public, which are often 120 Hz or even more. But those are not being displayed on consumer monitors, nor are those video sources available to home users in the form of streaming or disk playback.

Is this a good explanation of whether something is driven by a computer video card, or by a video source?

By computer video card:

Streaming apps

By video source:

Cable TV / satellite

Blu Ray / DVD player

Video game consoles

Mirror of PC when connected by HDMI cable

Any other device connected by HDMI, component cables, or composite cables
 

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Is this a good explanation of whether something is driven by a computer video card, or by a video source?

By computer video card:

Streaming apps

By video source:

Cable TV / satellite

Blu Ray / DVD player

Video game consoles

Mirror of PC when connected by HDMI cable

Any other device connected by HDMI, component cables, or composite cables

Mostly, yes. I stream services like Netflix and Disney+ using purpose built hardware like the AppleTV4K or the nVidia Shield, or the various Amazon devices. I consider that sort of streaming hardware to be another video source. I know some people use their computer to stream movies and output to a TV or use their phone and cast the video to the TV, but I don't. The original poster was apparently using their 900E as a computer monitor with a video card capable of high resolution and frame rates typical of game play, and had some questions about that. I don't game, and so I don't do that.
 

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I have no idea how it works when driven by a computer video card because I don't use it that way. But on fast motion video content, the fact it's an actual 120Hz panel is obvious.
OK, so you are referring to the so called "internal refresh rate" which is actually the frame processing rate by the video processor, which is very useful for frame interpolation use only.

In order to use frame interpolation successfully, the video source must have a number of FPS which is at least three times smaller than internal refresh rate.
So, a TV with a 120 Hz TV internal refresh rate can display video sources of 24/25/30 FPS successfully with motion smoothness even in fast motion video parts.

But a video source of 60 FPS can't be displayed successfully using the frame interpolation processing by a 120 Hz internal rate TV.
You need a 180 Hz internal refresh rate TV (I don't know any TV using this internal rate) which actually means you need a 240 Hz internal refresh rate TV for that.
 

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you don't need 3 times the source frame rate to frame interpolate 2 times is enough to not drop original frames (where did you even got the 3 times number from?). doing a 5/2 interpolation is quite popular on 60 HZ panels.

the 900E can be forced at 1080p to use native 120 HZ on a PC which proves it's a 120 HZ panel unsurprisingly.
 

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Could someone here kindly remind me (I lost my old note)of:confused::confused: how to check the software on my Sony 900E?

I would very much appreciate it.

Press the HELP button on the bottom left of your remote. This will give you the current software version.
 

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you don't need 3 times the source frame rate to frame interpolate 2 times is enough to not drop original frames (where did you even got the 3 times number from?). doing a 5/2 interpolation is quite popular on 60 HZ panels.

the 900E can be forced at 1080p to use native 120 HZ on a PC which proves it's a 120 HZ panel unsurprisingly.
On a 120 Hz TV, the frame interpolation will work fairly well for 24 FPS and 30 FPS material as both fit into 120 at least three times.
For 60 FPS material such as console games, computer display signals from a GPU, and certain broadcast signals, the frame interpolation used for motion blur reduction suffers from "hiccups".
It is often referred to as the "hurry up and wait" effect where the motion smoothing will appear OK for a few frames, then suddenly de-sync for a couple of frames, and repeat the cycle.
This is because there is no time to process the two key frames needed to go along with the third interpolated frame.
At 60 FPS, on a 120 Hz TV, the TV can process two frames per refresh cycle, which does not leave enough time to inject an interpolated frame every other frame, which is necessary for motion smoothing to work properly.
That is why TVs need processing at least three times the panel's refresh rate so that it can inject the interpolated frame in the time of each frame cycle.
In order to avoid the de-sync issue, a TV would have to have internal processing of at least 180 Hz for 60 FPS material to be displayed smoothly.
 

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this is just wrong even sony has over 90 ms inputlag this TV has 109 ms with frame interpolation that's close to 7 buffered frames.so it pretty much has ages to do the interpolation.

120 hz for active 3d will produce judder but that's a different story.
 

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This is an embarrasing question, but I can't find the answer. I've got an Oppo BDP-93 connected to the XBR 900 via HDMI and I've got the XBR connected to a Yamaha AV receiver via ARC. Whenever I turn on the BDP-93 to play a CD (or SACD or DVD-A), the TV comes on. When I try to use the remote to turn off the TV, the entire system -- TV, Blu-ray player and receiver -- turns off. Is there an easy way to turn off the TV while listening to music?
 

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This is an embarrasing question, but I can't find the answer. I've got an Oppo BDP-93 connected to the XBR 900 via HDMI and I've got the XBR connected to a Yamaha AV receiver via ARC. Whenever I turn on the BDP-93 to play a CD (or SACD or DVD-A), the TV comes on. When I try to use the remote to turn off the TV, the entire system -- TV, Blu-ray player and receiver -- turns off. Is there an easy way to turn off the TV while listening to music?
Short answer, no.

The problem is that you have the system set up so that powering on an attached device powers on the TV. While this is -convenient-, it is sometimes impractical. Similar with the HDMI-CEC control to power off attached devices when the TV is powered off.

Here are a couple of your options:

- Disable HDMI-CEC (BRAVIA Sync) on the TV and on your attached devices. This will require that you turn everything on and off individually, or you could use something like a Harmony Remote to do the powering on and off in "bulk"

- When you want to listen to music but don't want the TV on, go into the menu setting to turn the display off (on the TV). This will leave the TV technically powered on, but there will be no power to the panel.
 

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I used a file manager "X - plore" to copy some files from the TV to a USB flash drive.

I couldn't copy a file and couldn't write on the flash drive.

I couldn't even create a new folder on the USB flash drive.

Is there any way to write on it ?
 

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Dolby Digital with Peacock streaming service.


I just installed the new NBC Peacock streaming service app and started watching Battlestar Galactica. I noticed that it is only being decoded as PCM, although I get Dolby Digital when watching on a broadcast channel or cable. It is coming through ARC.


Is anyone else using Peacock yet and what is your experience?
 

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Dolby Digital with Peacock streaming service.

I just installed the new NBC Peacock streaming service app and started watching Battlestar Galactica. I noticed that it is only being decoded as PCM, although I get Dolby Digital when watching on a broadcast channel or cable. It is coming through ARC.

Is anyone else using Peacock yet and what is your experience?

I don't know what you're using for a streaming device, but like CBS All Access, it seems the Peacock app is only capable of delivering two channel audio on devices that use Android TV (or a subset thereof like the Amazon Fire devices do). Three out of four of my streaming devices only deliver stereo audio, while Disney+ and Netflix do just fine with DD, DD+, and Atmos.

I tried very hard over weeks to get CBSAA 'support' to acknowledge the problem and suggest they were working on a fix, and it was a painfully frustrating experience. So yesterday I cancelled the service. I'm not paying $10/month for a service where the provider is too stupid to understand current delivery standards, and thinks that HD with two channel audio is worth $10/month in 2020. Just pathetic.

I won't even mention the stupidity of the CBS app never remembering what I've watched, and no matter what show I select, always offering to play Season 1 Episode 1, forcing me to back track and manipulate around to figure out what episode is next for me. They don't seem to grasp the concept at all. I suppose that's what comes from making money hand over fist for many decades while running a four company monopoly (CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox).
 
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