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Hire a professional and don’t listen to these people. Your place most likely has metal studs and not wood. Do not use a full motion mount with drywall or into metal. Use a tilt or advanced tilt mount instead.

Yes, my drywall does have metal studs. What's the difference? Why can't you use a full motion mount with drywall and into metal? I don't get it.


I would need a full motion mount because my bed area (where I sit and watch the TV from) is not directly in front of the mounted TV. I need the TV to face sideways to the right.



Which is exactly why you use a cross member, between the (metal) studs. But, I'm out.

Good luck OP, with whatever you do.

Please continue helping.
 

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For HDR Games turn Dynamic tone mapping off, then don't forget to calibrate in game. If you just go from DTM on to DTM off things will look off before you recalibrate with the in game settings. After this you should no longer have the elevated blacks (at least this has solved it for me in all the games I play).



DTM on I get massive elevated blacks, especially Modern Warfare.
I've done that long ago and I still get elevated blacks on the xbox 1 x. It's either 1 or 2 things and that it's the xbox has bad black levels or the particular games I play have bad black levels because leaving brightness at default 50 and even dtm on on my ps4 pro I dont get those issues. But on the flip side i get some elevated blacks on opening credit scenes or transition scenes in movies with dtm on or off but I'm leaning towards that's the way some movies are because let's say I'm watching previews of movies before the main movie comes on on some of those opening preview scenes I get elevated blacks on on others I dont so its just a jungle out in the tv world when it comes to all of this stuff ha

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Hire a professional and don’️t listen to these people. Your place most likely has metal studs and not wood. Do not use a full motion mount with drywall or into metal. Use a tilt or advanced tilt mount instead.

Yes, my drywall does have metal studs. What's the difference? Why can't you use a full motion mount with drywall and into metal? I don't get it.


I would need a full motion mount because my bed area (where I sit and watch the TV from) is not directly in front of the mounted TV. I need the TV to face sideways to the right.



Which is exactly why you use a cross member, between the (metal) studs. But, I'm out.

Good luck OP, with whatever you do.

Please continue helping.
Judging by your previous posts and not being as informed with AV equipment I would advise you to hire a professional.
 

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Dumb mounting question. So I have a wall mounted 65 X900E today and while I have been trying to sell my 65 C7 does not seem to be any takers. I want to mount the C7 where the X900 E is but the LG mounting holes are so low in the TV to will raise the C7 too high for my preference. I can not lower the mount as the plate that the hidden cables come up the wall is right below the mount. Has anyone see a mount with very long mounting rails to be able to not have to lower a mount? Of maybe something specifically designed for this where one TV has mounting that is very different form another?
 

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Looking for feedback on Dynamic Tone Mapping. On my 7jA9G it is on by default with the Sony looking to maintain a consistent APL. What is the thinking around DTM, does it work as well as the Sony does? My understanding is that during calibration you can set the C9 to use the panel peak brightness to adjust the EOTF curve and let DTM preserve the details that would otherwise be lost du to hard clipping. Has anyone compared LG DTM to that in the Sony as to how they compare?
If you have a calibrated set and want to watch it as the director intended, leave it off. The TV will still tone map the videos in the scenes where it goes above the TV's brightness and tone maps the video appropriately. Other than that, the scenes that are below +/-700 nits will just follow the EOTF curve. You don't need DTM to be turned on at all. With the default off, the TV will try to tone map peaks that exceed 700 nits to make it visible up to 700 nits so you lose little details on those above 700 nits.

DTM is like using HDR10+. Where the TV now takes all the scenes and maps it dynamically in every scene regardless if it exceeds the TV's peak brightness or not. The only time I ever turned DTM on was on The Mandalorian where we know the video is technically, not even HDR worthy. The peak brightness of only 200 nits and normal scenes being below 100 nits was just too dark. This is where DTM helps to elevate the dark scenes and makes the video watchable.
Other than that show, I'd leave DTM off as that was how the videos were mastered and thankfully, they were way better than The Mandalorian's ridiculous 200 nits.

What is the consensus regarding the “smooth gradation” feature? My set is calibrated, but will it effect the picture quality in a positive or negative way? If positive, which setting is best?
After Calman resets the picture mode settings, I go into the picture mode and disable all enhancement features including smooth gradation. The times I see bad colour banding are far and few in between the videos and games that I'd rather not have it ruin the image.
If the person has a shadow on their body, goodness, smooth gradation does weird things to make it transition from the shirt colour to the shadowed area of the shirt. It looks really weird. So no thanks.
 

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I would need a full motion mount because my bed area (where I sit and watch the TV from) is not directly in front of the mounted TV. I need the TV to face sideways to the right.
I use this Aeon-40112 triple-articulating/rotating single-stud wall mount for my 32" kitchen TV. But it is good for 32" - 65" TV's, and can support up to 70 lbs. Precision machined bushings in each rotator. Face plate has 5-degree tilt up through 10-degree tilt down adjustments to allow small up/down facing tweaks continuously through 15-degrees. Cable guides within the struts, to keep things neat (I have power, HDMI, and ethernet cables).

Its real claim to fame is that it extends out to 29" from the wall, and then the final piece holding the TV itself can now rotate up to a full 180 degrees as with my own 32" TV (but of course depending on the size of the particular TV being used, and the physical location and area you install the mount in). The rotation piece on the wall is able to rotate to whatever physical orientation is possible in the space to swing the entire thing left or right. Then there's a middle rotator to let you fine-tune the placement. And once it's extended (out as much as 29" from the wall) ) or compressed you can "aim" the TV itself via the 180-degree third rotator to face wherever in the room you want.

It's perfect for where the wall-mounted TV is in my kitchen (and only uses a single stud behind the drywall), as I can aim it to face the dinette table in the eating area for when I'm sitting down and eating, or face me in the "work area" of the kitchen as things are getting prepped or cleaned up at the sink.



Highly recommended. Adjustable back-plate supports VESA 100 x 100 up through 400 x 400 mounting holes on back of the TV.

When fully compressed/compacted the TV's face is about 2" off of the wall. So it doesn't result in a "flush against the wall" arrangement. But it's perfectly fine for me, and I only push it back when cleaning the kitchen floor requires me to get it out of the way for the moment. Otherwise the TV is almost always extended out, rotated and faced somehow for actual viewing use.
 

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C9 losing HDR during USB playback?

Anyone having trouble with C9 HDR playback from USB occasionally becoming very muted? Almost like it "reverts" to SDR, or at least a bad form for tone mapping. The problem is immediately "fixed" (until it happens again) by just opening the main Options menu (I don't even have to pause playback), but of course I'd like it not to happen in the first place. I have of course turned off all kinds of dynamic tone mapping, AI stuff, etc.

(I think it may even fix itself on occasions; just after a scene transition I once noticed the TV suddenly "brightening" quite a bit during the first half second, which didn't seem part of the video. So it may have been "muted" without me noticing it, and then switching to proper HDR after the scene break. I know this sounds like a dynamic tone mapping issue, but I swear everything's turned off.)

It's easy to spot the problem using subtitles; they become a lot less bright when this happens (in itself a good thing, since subtitles in HDR are way too bright). I usually don't notice the actual "switch" when this occurs; it's just that I suddenly become aware that the colors (at least in dark scenes) are very muted, and that the scene has much less contrast and is quite a bit darker than seems right.

I didn't see any mention of this in the summary posts in the consolidated thread. I know I have seen mentions of this problem somewhere, but I have no idea where (even whether it's on this forum or another site) or how to search for it without checking every mention of "HDR", which is infeasible.
 

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Try "Warm1" with Technicolor - the usually recommended "Warm2" was way to brownish-green for me, "Warm1" looks better to my eyes.
Ugggh, i cannot use any warm presets i always prefer cool, but that's just me (cool) :p

Warm just looks like way to yellow/brownish for my tastes.
 

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Apologies if this has been asked before, I tried searching but couldn't find anything here or elsewhere

I've recently got a C9 65", replacing an ancient Samsung 60" LED. For SDR content I'm using ISF Bright Room, only setting I've changed is colour gamut to Auto

I noticed when my daughter was watching The Wiggles on YouTube that the yellow skivvy on the yellow wiggle looked dull/light compared to the other colours. I changed colour gamut to wide which made the yellow more vivid, more inline with how I'd expect yellow to look. Problem with that is the red and blue look way too bright and dominate the picture

I don't have this issue with HDR or Dolby Vision using Cinema and Cinema Home respectively

This happens through the inbuilt YouTube app, Apple TV4k and Nvidia Shield TV and not just limited to the Youtube app either

Is there anything that can be done with the colour yellow, or is that just how it is with auto colour gamut and SDR content?
 

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Also, what is the ideal height and viewing distance for a 55" TV? Viewing distance I'm not so much concerned about because my room is small and I really don't have any choice anyway. But for height, it's a different story because I can control that of course.
I would hand it so the TV is 40" off the ground to the bottom.......

Yes, my drywall does have metal studs. What's the difference? Why can't you use a full motion mount with drywall and into metal? I don't get it.
You can do what ever you want of course, odds are your 55" would be fine in a metal stud as long as you are careful moving around the TV. Metal studs flex, a 2 X 4 does not. There is just a difference between doing something that should be OK compared to a person hanging from the mount knowing it is good ;) I personally like to hang from my mounts before adding a TV. If you used that mount and went thru a 2 X 4 I would hang from that all day, metal stud would not even try it......
 

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I would never use a articulating mount with toggle bolts. However flat and tilt mount work with toggles as long as no one is going to be grabbing, hanging on the TV.
How about a flat/tilt mount with one screw in the middle in a stud and two screws in drywall anchors rated for 75# on each side of the mount (3 screws total) for a
 

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I've been a plasterer in the UK for over 30 years. That has involved all types of walls, including dry wall. I can say with complete confidence, as long as you are sensible, you should NEVER have a problem wall mounting a TV on plasterboard (that's what we call dry wall here).

I've just moved house, so excuse the decor (remodelling and redocoarating next year), but here is how I mounted my 65C9 on dry wall. The TV is hung using the official LG mount I originally purchased for my C7.

The studs are off center from where I the TV is hung (you can just see the screws), but using this method it isn't an issue. I used a piece of MDF board 18mm thick (3/4"), and for decorative purposes (when I eventually repaint) I used a router around the edges, although that is not necessary. 4 screws through the MDF into the studs and you have a solid base to fix any type of wall mount you like to it. If the studs are the metal type, use a pilot drill first through the MDF and stud, and use a course thread screw. Still unsure? Use 6-8 screws instead for piece of mind. It doesn't have to be MDF, 18mm (3/4") Ply Board will work, chipboard too. Anything like that is suitable, but MDF is easier to work with and decorates well if you want to blend it into the wall.

Anyone that can use a saw, a drill and a level can do something like this. No need to pay an arm and a leg for a professional if you are confident enough to cut the piece of board, find the stud centers, and screw it all together. I made mine, routed the edges, fixed it to the wall and had the TV hung all within 25 minutes.
 

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Judging by your previous posts and not being as informed with AV equipment I would advise you to hire a professional.

Yes, I'm not planning on doing it myself anyway. But before hiring someone to do this for me, I would need them to instruct what to do. I don't to "blindly" have them tell me what's going to happen because I'm sure that if I just say "yes" to all their suggestions, I'll end up paying a lot of money than actually necessary. This is the main reason why I'm asking for recommendation in this thread.


I use this Aeon-40112 triple-articulating/rotating single-stud wall mount for my 32" kitchen TV. But it is good for 32" - 65" TV's, and can support up to 70 lbs. Precision machined bushings in each rotator. Face plate has 5-degree tilt up through 10-degree tilt down adjustments to allow small up/down facing tweaks continuously through 15-degrees. Cable guides within the struts, to keep things neat (I have power, HDMI, and ethernet cables).

Its real claim to fame is that it extends out to 29" from the wall, and then the final piece holding the TV itself can now rotate up to a full 180 degrees as with my own 32" TV (but of course depending on the size of the particular TV being used, and the physical location and area you install the mount in). The rotation piece on the wall is able to rotate to whatever physical orientation is possible in the space to swing the entire thing left or right. Then there's a middle rotator to let you fine-tune the placement. And once it's extended (out as much as 29" from the wall) ) or compressed you can "aim" the TV itself via the 180-degree third rotator to face wherever in the room you want.

It's perfect for where the wall-mounted TV is in my kitchen (and only uses a single stud behind the drywall), as I can aim it to face the dinette table in the eating area for when I'm sitting down and eating, or face me in the "work area" of the kitchen as things are getting prepped or cleaned up at the sink.



Highly recommended. Adjustable back-plate supports VESA 100 x 100 up through 400 x 400 mounting holes on back of the TV.

When fully compressed/compacted the TV's face is about 2" off of the wall. So it doesn't result in a "flush against the wall" arrangement. But it's perfectly fine for me, and I only push it back when cleaning the kitchen floor requires me to get it out of the way for the moment. Otherwise the TV is almost always extended out, rotated and faced somehow for actual viewing use.

Thanks for the suggestion. As much as I wanted to go with that mount, is the price difference worth it compared to the mount that I have in mind? https://www.screenmounts.com.au/cantilever-tv-mount-p4 . In my country, this mount costs just around $12 or so. And North Bayou is an American brand, AFAIK.


I would hand it so the TV is 40" off the ground to the bottom.......

You can do what ever you want of course, odds are your 55" would be fine in a metal stud as long as you are careful moving around the TV. Metal studs flex, a 2 X 4 does not. There is just a difference between doing something that should be OK compared to a person hanging from the mount knowing it is good ;) I personally like to hang from my mounts before adding a TV. If you used that mount and went thru a 2 X 4 I would hang from that all day, metal stud would not even try it......
I've been a plasterer in the UK for over 30 years. That has involved all types of walls, including dry wall. I can say with complete confidence, as long as you are sensible, you should NEVER have a problem wall mounting a TV on plasterboard (that's what we call dry wall here).

I've just moved house, so excuse the decor (remodelling and redocoarating next year), but here is how I mounted my 65C9 on dry wall. The TV is hung using the official LG mount I originally purchased for my C7.

The studs are off center from where I the TV is hung (you can just see the screws), but using this method it isn't an issue. I used a piece of MDF board 18mm thick (3/4"), and for decorative purposes (when I eventually repaint) I used a router around the edges, although that is not necessary. 4 screws through the MDF into the studs and you have a solid base to fix any type of wall mount you like to it. If the studs are the metal type, use a pilot drill first through the MDF and stud, and use a course thread screw. Still unsure? Use 6-8 screws instead for piece of mind. It doesn't have to be MDF, 18mm (3/4") Ply Board will work, chipboard too. Anything like that is suitable, but MDF is easier to work with and decorates well if you want to blend it into the wall.

Anyone that can use a saw, a drill and a level can do something like this. No need to pay an arm and a leg for a professional if you are confident enough to cut the piece of board, find the stud centers, and screw it all together. I made mine, routed the edges, fixed it to the wall and had the TV hung all within 25 minutes.

Ok, got it. And using horizontal pieces of wood (either MDF, plywood, plyboard, chipboard, etc.) that would span at least two vertical metal studs will end up having the same "load capacity" compared to how a whole MDF board is used, right?
 

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Well yes it would, but in my opinion using a piece of MDF or something equivalent that you can cut to size and shape is going to be a lot more aesthetically pleasing. Also, using a board in this manner is going to spread the load more evenly, whereas using a couple strips of timber, if they aren’t secured correctly, have the potential to twist and buckle, especially on the metal type studs. My advice would be to use a pice of board in the manner I described, however you are free to do it any way you choose
 

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Judging by your previous posts and not being as informed with AV equipment I would advise you to hire a professional.

Yes, I'm not planning on doing it myself anyway. But before hiring someone to do this for me, I would need them to instruct what to do. I don't to "blindly" have them tell me what's going to happen because I'm sure that if I just say "yes" to all their suggestions, I'll end up paying a lot of money than actually necessary. This is the main reason why I'm asking for recommendation in this thread.


I use this Aeon-40112 triple-articulating/rotating single-stud wall mount for my 32" kitchen TV. But it is good for 32" - 65" TV's, and can support up to 70 lbs. Precision machined bushings in each rotator. Face plate has 5-degree tilt up through 10-degree tilt down adjustments to allow small up/down facing tweaks continuously through 15-degrees. Cable guides within the struts, to keep things neat (I have power, HDMI, and ethernet cables).

Its real claim to fame is that it extends out to 29" from the wall, and then the final piece holding the TV itself can now rotate up to a full 180 degrees as with my own 32" TV (but of course depending on the size of the particular TV being used, and the physical location and area you install the mount in). The rotation piece on the wall is able to rotate to whatever physical orientation is possible in the space to swing the entire thing left or right. Then there's a middle rotator to let you fine-tune the placement. And once it's extended (out as much as 29" from the wall) ) or compressed you can "aim" the TV itself via the 180-degree third rotator to face wherever in the room you want.

It's perfect for where the wall-mounted TV is in my kitchen (and only uses a single stud behind the drywall), as I can aim it to face the dinette table in the eating area for when I'm sitting down and eating, or face me in the "work area" of the kitchen as things are getting prepped or cleaned up at the sink.



Highly recommended. Adjustable back-plate supports VESA 100 x 100 up through 400 x 400 mounting holes on back of the TV.

When fully compressed/compacted the TV's face is about 2" off of the wall. So it doesn't result in a "flush against the wall" arrangement. But it's perfectly fine for me, and I only push it back when cleaning the kitchen floor requires me to get it out of the way for the moment. Otherwise the TV is almost always extended out, rotated and faced somehow for actual viewing use.

Thanks for the suggestion. As much as I wanted to go with that mount, is the price difference worth it compared to the mount that I have in mind? https://www.screenmounts.com.au/cantilever-tv-mount-p4 . In my country, this mount costs just around $12 or so. And North Bayou is an American brand, AFAIK.


I would hand it so the TV is 40" off the ground to the bottom.......

You can do what ever you want of course, odds are your 55" would be fine in a metal stud as long as you are careful moving around the TV. Metal studs flex, a 2 X 4 does not. There is just a difference between doing something that should be OK compared to a person hanging from the mount knowing it is good /forum/images/smilies/wink.gif I personally like to hang from my mounts before adding a TV. If you used that mount and went thru a 2 X 4 I would hang from that all day, metal stud would not even try it......
I've been a plasterer in the UK for over 30 years. That has involved all types of walls, including dry wall. I can say with complete confidence, as long as you are sensible, you should NEVER have a problem wall mounting a TV on plasterboard (that's what we call dry wall here).

I've just moved house, so excuse the decor (remodelling and redocoarating next year), but here is how I mounted my 65C9 on dry wall. The TV is hung using the official LG mount I originally purchased for my C7.

The studs are off center from where I the TV is hung (you can just see the screws), but using this method it isn't an issue. I used a piece of MDF board 18mm thick (3/4"), and for decorative purposes (when I eventually repaint) I used a router around the edges, although that is not necessary. 4 screws through the MDF into the studs and you have a solid base to fix any type of wall mount you like to it. If the studs are the metal type, use a pilot drill first through the MDF and stud, and use a course thread screw. Still unsure? Use 6-8 screws instead for piece of mind. It doesn't have to be MDF, 18mm (3/4") Ply Board will work, chipboard too. Anything like that is suitable, but MDF is easier to work with and decorates well if you want to blend it into the wall.

Anyone that can use a saw, a drill and a level can do something like this. No need to pay an arm and a leg for a professional if you are confident enough to cut the piece of board, find the stud centers, and screw it all together. I made mine, routed the edges, fixed it to the wall and had the TV hung all within 25 minutes.

Ok, got it. And using horizontal pieces of wood (either MDF, plywood, plyboard, chipboard, etc.) that would span at least two vertical metal studs will end up having the same "load capacity" compared to how a whole MDF board is used, right?
A single stud wall mount for a 55” in a metal Stud would be a hard pass from me. The easiest thing to do without doing anything crazy would be using a lightweight full motion mount that has mounting points in the center and outside of the mount. There’s multiple ways to secure it that id feel confident with for a 55” but that’s for the pro to decide.

As far as your sound question it depends on budget and priorities. Sonos is the best when it comes to a soundbar that is easy to use and sounds great and can be designed around your budget. All the TV Branded Soundbars are riddled with problems. Both Sonos bars could be mounted to the Full motion mount with Soundbar mounts. Sanus makes one for the beam and flexson makes one for the playbar. Both of the mounts are perfect, the universal mounts you can get won’t look as good or be as stable.

I understand budget is a concern but I can tell you with certainty that there is a difference in quality from the full motion mounts in the
 

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Thanks for the suggestion. As much as I wanted to go with that mount, is the price difference worth it compared to the mount that I have in mind? https://www.screenmounts.com.au/cantilever-tv-mount-p4 .
I can't judge. All I can comment on are the objective differences.

Your mount when fully compressed is 2.2" off the wall, and when fully extended is 19.6" off the wall. My mount is 2.6" fully compressed and 29.1" fully extended. This very much influences the size of the TV you can attach to it and have some degree of rotational freedom before one outer TV edge or the other hits the wall. My mount can hold a 60" TV rotated 90-degrees (i.e. perpendicular) to the wall. A 65" LG C9 is 57" wide, so it couldn't rotate the full 180-degrees, but a 55" could.

Your mount's specs claim support for a TV 32" - 47", whereas my mount claims support for 32" - 65" (note that the original product specs say 32" - 55"), with a 180-degree swivel at the end (assuming the TV edge doesn't hit the wall or a cabinet or something if it's not extended sufficiently).

Your mount supports 60lbs while my mount supports 70lbs. Your mount is made of SPCC, seamless steel tube and plastic. My mount is made of solid die-cast aluminum.

So it depends on your needs. I am 100% pleased that I purchased the Aeon mount for my kitchen and my 32" TV. Cost was not a criteria. The 29" extension and 180-degree rotation was the selling point, since I could then effortlessly point the TV anywhere I wanted in order to face either the eating area or the kitchen work area.
 
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