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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
**moderator, I cross posted this from another area because it was not getting many views, trying it here**


I am planning to purchase a BPT BP-3.5 from Chris Hoff when they come out in about 4-6 weeks. He recommends placing a 20A voltage regulator prior to the BPT unit in the electricity 'path'.


After much searching, the only 20 amp 'audio grade' voltage regulator I have found is the Furman AR-1220 . ExactPower makes the EP15A , but it is only rated at 15 amps. There is also the Monster AVS2000 , a variac based unit, but it is also only rated at 15 amps and it makes an appreciable amount of noise when it is operating. Since my receiver is rated at 12A maximum draw, and all of my other gear (except amplifiers) will be connected to the BP 3.5, I definitley want a 20A regulator.


I found numerous industrial type voltage regulators like the ones from Electronic Specialists, Inc , but after speaking with one of their engineers, was talked out of it. He mentioned that they were big, noisy, and not intended whatsoever for HT use.


Anyone have any experience with other brands of voltage regulators or have any recommendations? Thanks!
 

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I am struggling to understnd WHY a voltage regulator is recommended as a given in this installation.


Certainly, a 20-amp feed is understandable - meaning a 12AWG wired circuit to your service panel/breaker. Given this current capacity, the function of voltage OUGHT to be more of a constant.


In the past, I figured a VR is a specific tool only required when one's public power supply falls (sags) to 80V or below and/or surges above 140V (I'm rounding off) on some REGULAR basis. And if this were the case, I'd get on the utility's case to improve its delivery protocols.


Otherwise, modern component power supplies are designed for voltage fluctuation 110-127 or so.


I've plugged a small multimeter set at the 200VAC scale into the HT outlets over a period days to periodically see that I am getting 118V plus/minus 2V on a regular basis. So I dont need a VR.


Now BPT may produce a big inrush of current at first, tho I thot BPT had worked to reduce this.


I am leery of BPT REQUIRING a VR for this new 3.5 model for no other reason. Personally, I might stick with a 15amp or smaller model. As far as one's electrical circuits go, it will be seldom that one draws more than 12 amps for a HT system, meaning a 15-amp circuit suffices, tho nothing wrong with using 15-amp components in conjunction with 20-amp circuit feed.


In the latter case, components rated at 15 amps will tend to blow their fuses first before a 20-amp service panel breaker trips from pending overload.


bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In retrospect, I should have included the following information in the first post, but didn't want to write an overly wordy one:


I live in an old (100+ years) neighborhood where the power quality is quite poor (yes, I have phoned the utility company to complain on a couple of occasions). I had a Monster AVS2000 in my setup for a time which was constantly making it's 'chugging' sounds as it corrected the incoming voltage. I tried to insulate the sound but it did not really help, and I have seen the voltage meter on it read as much as +/- 15V from 120. This is why Chris suggested (I never said "required") using a VR in my setup. Also, I know the problem is not in my wiring because I replaced the old 40A panel and knob and tube wiring with 100% new wire (all the way out to the pole) and a 200A panel when I did a complete renovation. BTW, the transformer on the pole behind my house looks as though it's 20 years old, sun bleached (can't read the numbers on the side of it) and somewhat rusted.


As for the 15A question, my 7 x 170W receiver plus additional components will definitely max out a 15A circuit when watching a good action flick at THX levels (is there any other way to watch?), so I need to stick with 20A to ensure adequate power + a bit of headroom.


The 20A Furman model can be had for about $900, just curious if anyone knew of anything else reasonably priced in the same quality ballpark.
 

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You cut thru my blather and spotlited your situation with precision.


I've watched Furman's website for a coupla years, from when the AR-1220 was $600 (15A), and think this unit is very good design in the pro audio spectrum.


Compared to Monster AVS 2000, I think it's lag time is more instantaneous and correction is a tight +/- 5V.


bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK, this is just WAAYYY to scary.


I heard a diesel truck and backup beeper behind my house about an hour ago. I went outside to investigate and believe it or not, an Xcel Energy truck was out in the alley installing a brand-new transformer on the pole. I didn't even know they read this forum!


Maybe now I will not need the VR! I will keep an eye on the voltage tonight.

BTW, anyone know what the black '50' on the side of it represents? 50KvA perhaps?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Jetlag
As for the 15A question, my 7 x 170W receiver plus additional components will definitely max out a 15A circuit when watching a good action flick at THX levels (is there any other way to watch?), so I need to stick with 20A to ensure adequate power + a bit of headroom.
Receiver specs are notoriously overrated with all channels driven. Its highly unlikely your receiver is going to draw anywhere close to 1790 watts [Edit: 1190 watts] for any prolonged period of time. Also you're confusing trip value (continous amps over which a cicruit breaker will trip) and capacity. Both the Monster & Exactpower units have much greater capacity than their trip value. Any or all the units you mentioned will suffice. Bummer about your AC though.
 
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