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Ask ATS if they will make you a 24x36. Somebody is making those in their basement/garage so it shouldn't be hard to whip up some to fit the posters. The backing is Luan 1/4 inch plywood and the frame is pine. All off the shelf at Home Depot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/20848212


Ask ATS if they will make you a 24x36. Somebody is making those in their basement/garage so it shouldn't be hard to whip up some to fit the posters. The backing is Luan 1/4 inch plywood and the frame is pine. All off the shelf at Home Depot.

I looked more into this tonight surfing around, and it seems some people have had luck with the $15 cheap miter saw from home depot, and just stapling 3 time on each side on each corner. I might give that a try. I already have a good staple gun, so would only be a $20-25 experiment to see if I won't totally screw them up
 

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Staples no, Miter saw no, Invest in a drill.

Have HD cut your lumber to length, then use butt joints, Drill pilot holes and then using the drill insert screws.


You can cut the luan 1/4 plywood with several passes of a utility knife and a straight edge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was planning on doing the method where you have a 2 inch frame, then put AT fabric on it, then put the insulation on top of that, then more AT fabric. Then you have a built in 2 inch air gap.


One thing I don't know is. For my panels that I want to do 24x48, do I make the inside o the panels 24x48 to hold the 24x48 acoustic material? Or do I make the outside 24x48 and squish the material in?
 

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If you are going to use backing. Go 24x48 as the outside dimensions. You can buy 2x4 panels of this backing material at HD and as BIG stated, just use butt joints and screws. The insulation material can easily be cut down to size. That approach would have minimal 'carpentry' req'd.
 

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why use backing at all? it's added cost which at best offers zero increase in effectiveness of the broadband absorber to attenuate specular reflections - and at worse decreases effectiveness by limiting the air-gap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/20848783


Staples no, Miter saw no, Invest in a drill.

Have HD cut your lumber to length, then use butt joints, Drill pilot holes and then using the drill insert screws.

This will be a dumb question, but I have lived in condos my whole life before this so no nothing about all this stuff.


Should I cut the wood for the frames to be like this:

Code:
Code:
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|  |  OR  |  |  OR  |  |
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Also, what size of wood is best to use for this? I want to put 2 inch acoustic material in it. Would 1x2's be best? 2x2's?


Thanks!
 

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Now it gets confusing. 1x2s are actually 3/4 x 1 1/2.


I am not aware of anything on the shelf that is 2 inches. You could actually stack 3 1x2s the flat way and get 2 1/4. You could then alternate your designs using the first and second and get really strong joints. Just nail or screw the layers together.


I would use my table saw and cut something but since you are an tool-less DIY it is tough.

You actually might want to consider ordering canvas stretcher bars.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roshy /forum/post/20856245


Should I cut the wood for the frames to be like this:
Code:
Code:
====      |==|      |===
|  |  OR  |  |  OR  |  |
====      |==|      ===|
Also, what size of wood is best to use for this? I want to put 2 inch acoustic material in it. Would 1x2's be best? 2x2's?

Thanks!

Any of those arrangements would work fine. If I were just butting square cut ends of material together I'd use the second one to place the seam on the top and bottom but if in a specific installation I thought the sides were more visible I'd use the first one. But it's a pretty minor concern so if one were to make for easier assembly or stronger joining (if I were just going with staples for example, and also depending on how I intended to hang the panels) I would probably choose on that basis. The third one is sometimes useful because you can just cut all the pieces to the same length to save work when making a square panel.


Mitering the corners probably produces the best result in terms of making sure things match up, but if you are limited to staples for joinery it's not the best option.

Here is the lumber dimensions page I usually use for reference.


There's no need to add extra weight to the panels; 1-by lumber should be good enough. Use the other dimension to change the space behind based on how thick you want the panels, per the chart.


You have to buy the "white wood" or (better but more costly) "select" grade lumber to get something that isn't a pretzel and won't turn into one a few days after bringing it home (I learned this the hard way - built a panel with a furring strip backbone, adjusted for its warp in assembly, and it warped further after... the finished panel will be warped forever but at least no one else will probably ever notice). Even in those higher quality bins you will find some strangely shaped pieces which can make assembly "challenging" shall we say.


Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So off that page you linked, a 1x3 is 2.5" thick. That wouldn't be bad either. Then theres a built-in half inch air gap.


How do I go about securing the acoustic insulation to the wood? Or do people not bother?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roshy
So off that page you linked, a 1x3 is 2.5" thick. That wouldn't be bad either. Then theres a built-in half inch air gap.


How do I go about securing the acoustic insulation to the wood? Or do people not bother?
Oh I thought you were making this style such that the lumber would define the air space behind the absorbent. This also has the advantage of leaving the side of the absorbent material open so you get extra absorption out of each panel as long as they aren't placed directly side by side. Of course that could be good or bad depending on the acoustical situation.


If you are going to put the absorbent material inside the frame, 2.5" for 2" material should work fine. Usually you don't affix the absorbent inside the frame as it will friction fit if you size them closely (that's what I have on mine, though my frames are also open on the sides, bottom and top and don't have backing fabric so they are completely reconfigurable). However it wouldn't hurt to put in a little insurance against it pushing out the fabric in front. If using rigid panels something like a quarter inch deep spacer piece at the front and back of each corner would do the job nicely. If using a piece of floppy insulation you could consider putting some small dowels across the front. For any of these solutions you are going to want to make sure they sit just slightly behind the front of the frame. The less stuff touching the fabric the less likelihood you will have of things showing through, whether by making a bulge in the fabric or by being able to see it a bit optically. Personally, if I wasn't designing for an air gap behind the panel, I wouldn't worry about whether or not I had one.
 

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If you want additional air gap wall/panel, you can affix board to wall and (2) cross braces to your wood frame, and hang the panel from those.


From another post I made, http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...8#post19947658

Quote:
Hanging 101 for DIY framed 2' x 4' acoustic panels:


I used alum "z" from ats acoustics, http://www.atsacoustics.com/item--ac...are--IK12.html



They were set 3" in from each frame edge to have invisible look and the frame sorta just float there.


Note:

Wall to frame spacer/holders were pre-made, pre-drilled (each then acts as its own drill jig for holes into the wall), and painted wall color prior.

Mine were 19" wide and 3 1/2 tall, and 1 1/2 inches thick, basically scrap stuff I had lying around.


Measure twice, use blue tape for visual markers, locate top holder, mine was a 1 1/2" thick piece so the panel would have 2" air gap.

Hold with hand, drill into drywall with 3" deck screw, mini-level assures level, Locate bottom holder, drill into drywall with 3" deck screw.




Remove, use drilled holes to locate the 50lb plastic dywall anchors------Re-attach top/bottom holders, using 3" deck screw.



If measurements done correctly slight tweaks to get level----



this shows 2" air gap




That's all for tonight, later I'll post my acoustic cloud DIY making/hanging method....


I should say:

-the cloth wrapped fiberglass is nicely held rigid in, no worries about it ever coming out, even due to my kids possible "abuse".

That's why I made channels instead of just "boxing it in"....I was un-sure about the robustness of just that way.

-a 3 point mtg, 2 top and 1 bottom, is very secure and quite easy to locate and level, don't be concerned so much.

-the WAF is extremely high on these, she likes them!
btw, now that I made these I can say my method of holding the fiberglass inside the frame is so overkill....as a dad of active kids I was worried about them abusing the panels.


Sure, I "gave up" the edge absorption by having my wood frame like it is....and probably introduced some un-wanted reflections that my ETC graphs will show...oh well live and learn....but they do look "pretty", like picture frames, and soon I'll have some images inside them instead of black speaker grille cloth.
 

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Yeah, Mike's look good, I've seen them in person. I never realized that you have interchangeable fabric, Mike. That's a great advantage of your design. You could print movie posters on them and exchange them periodically if you wanted to.

Attachment 220831

That's a picture of the sketchup design of mine. The picture uses 1/4" dowel but mine were built with 3/8" dowel. At the joints they are glued and nailed with wire nails. We stretched fabric over them, stapled it to the back edge and trimmed it. The first ones I built were 2" deep, the next ones are 2.25" or 3.25" (should have built them all with the extra 1/4"). I have acoustical foam in them for the moment, and they hang on the wall with two wire nails each. They weigh next to nothing so it's fine. They do move if you bump them... I have painter's tape on the wall near the edges so if they move out of position it is obvious and I just slide them back.


I built similar for the room door and closet doors in the back of the room, and had my GF's dad bend some custom metal door hooks to hang them. If I get pressured I might finally start a build thread and then I can show what I did there (among other things in my room you haven't seen yet).



The biggest issue with the whole thing was finding dowels that were straight enough for me to consider them usable. I think I took all the good 3/8" dowels from four different Lowes stores, and a few from the D before I realized after working with them that the D ones suck (they come from China and are not hardwood regardless of what they say, though they did have the possible advantage of being even lighter than the Lowes ones).


Thicker would be better but I have quite a small room to deal with. And I had decided to get the foam before I had learned much about acoustics, though I think it actually works well for reflection point panels. You just can't expect them to do anything with bass, which seems to work fine for me. My latest test (finished about an hour ago) actually shows I'm as good as I think is needed there.
 

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Roshy.. Check your pm... Again, I just used 2x4's and cut them down to exactly 2x2's. I had extra 2x4's left from my theater build. Just know that a 2x4 isn't really 2x4 either. I know you are short on tools but I did all the ends cut at a 45degree angle, then used a brad nailer to nail the corners together. If you use the correct material, I used roxul rock wool, you have to cut it to size, it doesn't squish. Also, if you use that type of material, it's heavy stuff too, make sure when mounting to the wall to use hangers that hold the amount of weight.....


Oh yeah, and mine is not secured inside the frame, just sits there, it's hanging on the wall, it's not going anywhere....


Also, I am not a woodworker by no means at all, but always, always measure twice, cut once. Don't measure once and cut twice - I did that a few times....


Don't forget, most important..... Pictures! :)
 
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