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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I recently purchased a Gateway 42" ED UltraBright plasma. I've been very happy with it until I just noticed something that concerns me. I've had it for a little over two weeks now but have been using it mostly in 3:4 format just for standard cable, not having had much time for DVDs. I just watched 2001:a space odyssey though, and I noticed that in the space scenes when the screen is mostly black I can faintly see the borders of where the 3:4 format normally ends. On the edges of the screen, that is, outside of the 3:4 bordered area the blacks aren't quite as black as in the center, within the 3:4 format area. It's very faint and only noticeable when the screen is black. It seems like somekind of burn-in but I don't see how that could happen when it's never been left on or had an extended image on it. My guess was that perhaps since the screen is new and the cells on the side in the widescreen area have hardly been used they haven't warmed up yet to the same tone as the center of the screen. Do you guys know what's going on.


(And please don't just post to tell me the Gateway plasmas are trash, because I was under the same impression until I saw the UltraBright version in person and picked it over the widescreen HDTV projection TV I had planned on getting).


Thanks for any kind of help,

Austin
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just to add to this, I just noticed that even if a still image is left on the screen for a matter of seconds, such as the "DVD" logo that stays on the screen for a few seconds when you first turn the DVD player on, you can immediately afterward notice the faint image left when the screen is black. It then goes away soon. The same thing happens after you use the settings menu on the tv.
 

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That short-term image logo thing is normal. You should be using anti-burn-in measures like don't use 4:3 mode exclusively, mixe it up with a stretch or zoom mode. Plus use any built-in features like inverse or white screen for a few hours to compensate for uneven wear.
 

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Also, turn down your contrast!


Spleen
 

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This isn't too much hep, but I remember reading in this forum that a calibration DVD (or something of the like) exists where you can view a still image of white borders and a black center to "inverse" the effect. Supposedly you leave the TV in this mode for hours at a time.


Once fixed, pay attention to duration watched while viewing in 4:3 or similar aspect ratios.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK, thanks guys. I haven't checked to see whether it has any built in features like color reverse or white screen, but if it doesn't can you pick up dvd's that do this kind of stuff?


Austin
 

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The screen's rate of phosphor aging is highest during the first few hundred hours of operation. It is important to reduce contrast and avoid static images and prolonged viewing of non full-screen material during this break-in period. The problem is probably temporary, but try watching 4:3 programming with one of the stretch modes for a while.


-Steve
 

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You really ought to be watching 4:3 in stretch modes.


You really ought to search the forum for the thousands of posts on this topic.


You really need to use Avia to calibrate bightness and, especially, contrast.


You can fix your problem by creating an inverse image with a computer if needed.


The temporary "retention" of an image is a different phenomenon, it's due to voltage build up. Calibrating will help that, too.


Gateway should be taken out to the friggin' woodshed.
 

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Hi Austin,


If your panel doesn't have a built-in orbiter function or grey sidebands, and you like watching in original aspect ratio, then the only solution is an external orbiter. If you feed it RGBHV I have a spare Inline or Extron unit which I can sell you cheap. But if that isn't your current main input it will be a true ordeal converting the signal first, so I'd hold off for a simpler solution.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by rogo


You really need to use Avia to calibrate bightness and, especially, contrast.

How have you used AVIA to calibrate contrast on a plasma display? I have not yet figured out how to be be very successful at using AVIA (or DVE) for this purpose.
 

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...and as rogo always say: Watch full screen only the first 200 hours ; it is a reasonable break-in period.



-Alan
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by camshaft
Just to add to this, I just noticed that even if a still image is left on the screen for a matter of seconds, such as the "DVD" logo that stays on the screen for a few seconds when you first turn the DVD player on, you can immediately afterward notice the faint image left when the screen is black. It then goes away soon. The same thing happens after you use the settings menu on the tv.
After 3600 hours on my Sony 32" plasma I have always had this problem. There is no cure, but no corrective measures are needed either. The problem is that plasma phosphors after being excited do not completely return to their off state for a period of time. Without any corrective action they eventually return to their original lower off state. I have noticed a residual effect up to eight hours later.


I can also see menu items and the DVD logo sometimes.


Tonight I watched Place Vendome. The menu had a large image of Catherine Deneuve which I had on the screen for perhaps 30 seconds. When the 2.35 movie started the top black section of the screen had a slightly lighter area where her head had been. When I returned to the movie after watching the Lakers at 4:3 I now had darker areas in the four corners of the movie. Within half an hour both had disappeared.


If it really bothers you on a particular movie, you can turn on a white screen for a few minutes. What this does is to get all the phosphors excited so that they all return to the same higher off state temporarily.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by shadowspawn
How have you used AVIA to calibrate contrast on a plasma display? I have not yet figured out how to be be very successful at using AVIA (or DVE) for this purpose.
I guess I don't know how to answer this. I follow the voice over. It works for me.


Mark
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by shadowspawn
How have you used AVIA to calibrate contrast on a plasma display? I have not yet figured out how to be be very successful at using AVIA (or DVE) for this purpose.
I also have this same question. According to Avia, the contrast setting for CRT televisions should be below the point of blooming of the white patches or bending of the vertical lines. Since plasma TVs won't do that, it tells us to make sure that the two vertical bands moving back and forth in the white area should not disappear (indicating loss of white detail). However, no matter how high I set contrast, these patterns never disappear. I have just had to arbitrarily come up with contrast myself and always wondered if it was too high. I would love some help on this.


George
 

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Use a graduated gray scale test pattern and make sure you can distinguish between all the levels of gray. If contrast is set too high the top levels will all look the same bright white. Reduce contrast until that doesn't happen.
 

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"I don't see how that could happen when it's never been left on or had an extended image on it."


Just want to make sure camshaft understands that 4:3 with black bars IS a static image and a particularly damaging one at that, if used too often. Dont think because they are black that they can't hurt.
 
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