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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well tonight starts the massive 3-D film fest at the Egyptian. The really good ones are sold out (House of Wax, Kiss Me Kate, It Came from Outer Space (just recently, 'cause just recently it was posted that Ray Bradbury was going to be there), Creature from the Black Lagoon and Dial "M" for Murder), but tickets may be available for them if you show up early. But plenty of films remain: 3dfilmfest.com.


Remember most of the 3-D films are not very good films, but the process is pretty cool, and many of these haven't been seen in 3-D for fifty years. And there are plenty of worthwhile films still with tickets available.


...Just a heads up for those in the area. I'm braving a rush-hour drive to scary old Hollywood myself tonight for House of Wax.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Shaded Dogfood
...Just a heads up for those in the area. I'm braving a rush-hour drive to scary old Hollywood myself tonight for House of Wax.
Dude- you suck :D Why were we robbed of the chance to watch H-O-W in 3-D on the new DVD?? Enjoy the show and don't let anything hit you in the head. :p


___________________________________

"Would you like..... A MENU!!!!?" -- Count Floyd in Count Floyd's 3-D House Of Pancakes
 

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Cool... Wish I could make that...


Do you know what techniques are being used for the 3d ?? Polorized I hope ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It was polarized; the highlights certainly cast relections off one lens or the other with the polarizing glasses/eyeglasses combination, but House of Wax was great (third time I had seen it in 3-D). The people were hanging from the rafters, and they showed a 3-D short from the 1939 World's Fair about the stop-motion assembly of an automobile.


And, How the West Was Won is playing at the Arclight Cinerama dome about five or six blocks down on Sunset Blvd in Cinerama!

It Came from Outer Space tonight...
 

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Check out the related web site:


3dfilmfest.com


SubaCat Productions are offering related souvenir items including a DVD of 3D Trailers. 12 minutes, of which, are presented in analglyph 3D.
 

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We just got back in last night from the 3-D fest. Wish we could have stayed longer, but we only had a weekend and a couple of vacation days. That was really a blast. Some of the films were in exceptionally good shape. HOUSE OF WAX, THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON, IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE and KISS ME KATE were astonishingly good in polarized 3-D. It was also great fun to see sci fi luminaries such as Ray Bradbury, Forrest Ackerman and Bob Burns.


Burns told a hilarious story about taking his bride-to-be on a first date to the original 3-D showing of CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER. When the Indians' arrows and spears start flying out of the screen and toward the audience, Burns pulls out an arrow he's secreted into the moviehouse out and sticks it on his chest, screaming and acting as if he's been shot. As told by Burns, pandemonium breaks out and people start tossing off their 3-D glasses, as if that would protect them from getting shot as well.


Also interesting to see the number of genre directors who attended. Quentin Tarantino, John Landis and Joe Dante were all conspicuous.

My favorite celebrity sighting, though, was when 'Ro-Man', of ROBOT MONSTER walked out of the theater and joined the crowd outside. Perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
People in the crowd last night at Revenge of the Creature said that there were people from Australia and Germany and all over the US who had come in for the festival. As for celebrities, I saw Leonard Maltin and L.A. Confidential director Curtis Hanson at several of the screenings.


I've had a splendid old time, but let me tell you, dirving back sixty miles to South Orange County at one in the morning and then going to work the next day is a bit grueling. I'll tell some more tales for the select few who come to this thread later on.
 

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Wow-- I do occasionally miss living adjacent to civilization and this is one of those times :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
living adjacent to civilization


Well... consider the recall... Also, driving on the freeways, one is presented with a suspicion of what it must be like to live in India or Shanghai as far as population density is concerned. Also, driving back on Friday down Sunset Blvd on the strip, with its zillions of twentysomethings outside the clubs and the enormous fifteen-story billboards and neon everywhere- it did seem all one needed was a Ziggurat and you would have Bladerunner already. (Orange County already has its own small Ziggurat, and I work in it!)


It's a rush, but I dream sentimentally of the South. The price of civilization can get to be kind of steep sometimes, and being in the provinces can have its own advantages.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Final thoughts on the 3-D film festival... This is awfully long. Hope someone takes the time to plow through all of this, 'cause it took me several hours to compose.

House of Wax Saw it a bit too close- got in line too late- though the 3-D worked even looking at an up angle to the screen. The elements are in great shape, however, its stereo soundtrack has been lost. Great depth, acceptable pop-out effects, my vote for the best of all 3-D films, except that they show you the makeup on the killer way too early in the film.

It Came From Outer Space A beautiful, jewel-like little B&W almost-classic. The first of the aliens-taking-over-one's-identity films, probably even pre-dating Jack Finney's The Body Snatchers novel from which Don Siegel's great classic Invasion of was fashioned two years later. Great depth to the image, a great scene at the first as Richard Carlson swings a telescope out into the audience and one of the best "pop-outs" as a pebble from the landslide really makes you jump.


Extremely illuminating talk from Ray Bradbury, Forry Ackerman and Kathleen Hughes, who had a tiny role, but who was a hot little number. Bradbury thought that showing the aliens wrecked the picture. Probably it didn't, but they showed them too early. A very talky film, but the beautiful use of 3-D and stereophonic sound made it one of the real winners of the festival.


And somehow its stereo soundtrack survived. A local sound company did $20.000 worth of work for free, copying Univeral's magnetic tapes of the soundtrack to a computer hard drive and then syncing the hard drive to the projectors. This was, after Fantasia and a couple of the now-lost Warners 3-D films, the earliest of stereophonic films.

Revenge of the Creature Would have preferred the first in the series, but it had sold out; in truth, none of the series is very good, so this one was as good as the first to watch 3-D. Unfortunately, a good many of the shots, especially the underwater ones, didn't seem to have worked properly, so the movie went back and forth between 3-D and flat footage; the underwater footage in paricular had a high failure rate. This flopping back and forth took you out of the picture. But it was the last 3-D film of the fifties, made well after the craze had died, and was destined to be released flat to most theaters anyway.


The before-the-film commentaries featured stars Lori Nelson as the romantic lead, and Tom Hennessy as the "on-land" creature and some of the "tanK" footage creature as well. He spun one tale that went on leisurely, enough to get everyone on stage anxious as to "where is this going", concerning the trials and tribulations of his being walked around the tank, like they so with sharks, with one of the male leads. It seems when he "came to" and started to attack the hero, some of the local muscle guys from Florida hired as extras jumped on him and started pounding on him as if he really was a creature. He said that he took it for a while and then lost his temper and picked one of them up and threw him against the wall of the tank and broke several of his ribs. The audience went nuts.


There was a Disney cartoon in 3-D, Working for Peanuts with Donald and Chip & Dale, which was okay. Stereo cartoons are only a bunch of planes slightly separated.

The Maze William Cameron Menzies' notorious "Old Dark House" programmer from Monogram/Allied Artists, which was so cheaply made that his production design genius was scarcely in evidence at all. And the twist ending was pretty ludicrous, though it turned the film into a rather riotous comedy. Still, the 3-D was pretty good, and the film was rather charming in a cheesy way. Probably should have gone to Phantom of the Rue Morgue and The Glass Key the night before instead.


The short on this program was Doom Town, about an A-bomb test in 1953. The business part of the film, the actual bomb explosion, ahd been lost, but a restorer had been able to reconstruct 3-D footage because much footage taken during bomb tests were taken with dual cameras, with one as a backup. This brief (a minute or so) footage was good 3-D and rather chilling, though little was of the mushroom cloud- it was mainly houses exploding and cars having the paint blasted off.

The Mad Magician Cheap columbia programmer with Vincent Price. Okay, with pretty good 3-D.

Rarities in 3-D One of the most interesting of the whole series. Apparently in the early eighties, a film called the 3-D Movie was begun, using the "Over/Under" technique of putting the image on one frame of film, with the frame split horizontally. Jaws 3-D was done this way. The backers of the film went out of business, and Jeff Josephs of Sabucat (who organized the series) said that a great deal of footage was retrieved by "dumpster diving". Unfortunately, this presentation necessitated cropping the image (like they did with Gone With the Wind in 1967 when it was released as "wide screen"). They showed interpositive work footage from this aborted project, clips from Son of Sinbad and a British short of the coronation of Elizabeth II.


Also shown was this sort of badly color timed footage clips from other films that are for all practical purposes lost 3-d films: Three Redheads from Seattle, Devils' Canyon (this one looked really good), Jivaro (only released flat), and several others I can't recall. They seemed for the most part no great loss.


The one clip that elicited "oohs" and "ahhs" from the 3-D mavens in the audience was the only existing example of Edwin Land's Spectragraphic 3-D process, one that put polarized material on one frame of film in an incredibly complicated process. It was about three choppy minutes of a Disney cartoon. The 3-D was flawed but interesting. This development came too little, too late, at the end of the 3-D craze, and had it been properly developed, 3-D films might have continued longer than they had. Land was so disgusted he had all of the footage destroyed, all but this one brief clip.


There was also ancient footage of anaglyph red-cyan footage from the twenties, possibly the earliest of all 3-D movie footage. They passed out special red-blue glasses for this. There was also footage from the Lumiere brothers from the 1930's, a train coming into the station, and footage taken on an actual movie set during a film of the period. This stuff looked good.


There was also German footage from the mid to late thirties that was shot with a camera that ran the film horizontally, a la VistaVision, then anamorphically squeezed it to put each side into a single frame, and required a similar setup to project it. Once again, Sabucat was able to get local labs to convert all of this digitally and re-print it to dual films that could be sync-projected in the manner of other 3-D films. Like most of the work required for the rest of the fesival, this seemed to have been done for free, simply for the love of the process and curiosity to be able to see it again. And once again, the same sound company that synced It Came From Outer Space came through and provided sound for all of the clips that had originally been announced as being presented silent!


Would like to stayed in Hollywood yesterday and to have seen I, the Jury and its 3-D 3 Stooges short and Martin and Lewis' Money from Home, but I opted instead to see Neil Young's Greendale tour at the Verizon amphitheater in Irvine and didn't regret the decision for an instant!!


Final thoughts: wished I could have seen Kiss Me, kate and Dial M for Murder, but I waited too long to order my tickets, but they will be sure to survive and be shown again. And though M.C. Jeff Josephs said that he would never do this again, friend Don claimed that he said last night that he might do it again only if he could show John Wayne's Hondo, and he knew that would never happen!


This was truly a remarkable festival, everything promised and more. They could tour these films to other metropolitan centers, particularly in Europe and probably the Pacific as well. Wished I could have gone to more.







:D :D :D
 

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Sounds amazing! I never knew that Dial M was a 3-D film. I wish House of Wax could be done in a 3-D presentation for DVD.
 

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Fredprog is right...why isn't 3-D represented in DVD? Are there tech problems to overcome? Also, if anyone from Criterion is reading this, would you please release a three disc (each disc containing a different panel of the same film) set of some Cinerama titles? There are so many people with video projectors that it would be fun to set 3 of these projectors together to put on your very own Cinerama experience.
 

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Dog--


Excellent post. Thanks for taking the time to write up your impresssions. SabuCat should be commended for doing a superb job of running this event (e.g.--the excellent website with precise pre-ordering options, the four entry lines let in as separate waves, the guests and special program notes, repeatedly making sure people had glasses and reminding them to avoid marking them with fingerprints, etc.)


So much about this festival was so good that it's a shame it isn't going on the road. Especially considering the fact that they were videotaping the interviews and Q & As with the guests. That would play nicely before each roadshow presentation.


I disagree only slightly in your appraisals in that I have an unabashed affection for the first two CREATURE films, particularly since I have a fond memory of scaring the hell out of a friend who sat in front of me the first time I saw it in 3-D. Conversely, I enjoyed IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE, but after a few minutes theremin music gets on my nerves. It was the first science fiction cliche to be overused.


I really wanted to see THE FRENCH LINE and MISS SADIE THOMPSON, but it was tough enough to get away for a few days to enjoy this unique event.

I hope they reconsider and do this again; I'd fly across the country for an encore presentation!


Finally, I know anaglyphic 3-D is inferior, but inferior is better than nothing. They really need to release some of these films as dual version DVDs, one flat and one in anaglyphic 3-D. I've got an anaglyphic version of GORILLA AT LARGE on VHS, and, yes, it stinks, but it works. With the superior color resolution of DVD, these films would be great party films or novelties for home theater get-togethers.


--Mike
 

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Did any of you see the Randolph Scott western The Stranger Wore A Gun.? I believe it was showing the first night of the festival, I would have loved to have been able to see this film and many of the others. When 3-D came out I was eleven years old and saw many of the movies presented at the festival. I thought 3-D was great!
 

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Badger--


I saw it right after HOUSE OF WAX the first night. We just flew in, so the two hour time shift from Central Time was a killer; it was like having the second film start at 11:00pm back home. STRANGER was fun; really corny, old-fashioned western with very bright color in the interior shots. The numerous stagecoach/desperado chases and shootouts in the outdoor shots were terrific.


Also, they took some stock flat footage and worked it in as 3-D by rolling cacti and rocks in front of the camera as the flat footage was back-projected. Hokey fun.


--Mike
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Urchinn
Also, if anyone from Criterion is reading this, would you please release a three disc (each disc containing a different panel of the same film) set of some Cinerama titles? There are so many people with video projectors that it would be fun to set 3 of these projectors together to put on your very own Cinerama experience.
Now that's nuts. Absolutely insane. Ridiculous.


I'm IN!!!!!! :D :D :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mpls Mike:


Somebody sitting a seat or two over was saying, as we discussed the long distances people came to see these films, that he had a guy behind him in line from Minnesota. I immediately thought of how it was most likely you.


badgerfan:


I was ready for Stranger Wore a Gun, but friend Don, with whom I was crashing, had seen it and was not too interested. I was ready for Arena as well and we could have gotten tickets, but we were a little late and he nixed it as well. On the other hand, he was ready for The French Line, and by Sunday I was just too tuckered out for a 120 mile round-trip drive for a mediocre musical, JR or no JR.


FredProgGH:


I saw How the West Was Won Sunday a week ago, and I'll share my observations on three-strip Cinerama in a separate post in the next day or so. It ain't what it used to be, let me say that.
 

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Caught the sold-out Dial M For Murder screening by getting in the stand-by line a couple of hours ahead. The festival staff had said that for all but one of the 'sold-out' screenings, EVERYONE in the stand-by line got in anyway with maybe one or two seats left over...It pays to be a die-hard.


For future reference: There were three of us in our party and the staff told everyone in line that finding even two seats together (especially if you were in the stand-by line) would be virtually impossible. Well, by the time all the other lines were ushered in and the stand-by line was allowed in (delaying the screening by at least 1/2 hour), the 'reserved' signs on some of the best seats in the house had long passed their usefulness. All three of us sat together and were in the same aisle and three seats away from the guest of honor, Pat Hitchcock.


Did I already say it pays to be a die-hard? LOL!


Dial M was fun and not too 'gimmicky' in 3-D. Lots of dramatic points getting emphasis by pushing certain elements into the foreground; her handbag, the key, the killer's hands with the scarf and, of course, the scissors and Kelly's hand thrust out to the audience/the scissors.


Interesting that one can always see the scissors 'gag' planted on Anthony Dawson's back before Kelly reaches for the real pair on the desk, but the scene was effective as ever. You'd think that seeing the secret of the 'trick' would spoil the horror/suspense, but Kelly and Dawson do such a terrific job of selling the moment and it just points up how the impact of a movie scene is much more about montage than 'perfect' special effects. Hitch's 'pure cinema'.


You could see that Hitchcock directed it with 3-D in mind, but it was also clear that he wasn't going to risk a masterpiece like Rear Window on the questionable process either as this was not one of them, in my opinion. But it's certainly a good one. Evidently, although there were a couple of 3-D prints originally made, none were ever presented except under very limited special engagements and no one has yet found anyone who actually SAW the 3-D version of Dial M back in 1953/54.


Money From Home was mildly entertaining. I think this was the only Martin and Lewis movie I hadn't already seen and, honestly, I think it is probably my least favorite of all of them now. The most interesting thing about it was that it was apparently only one of two movies (the other one wasn't named) that was shot in 3-D using two original three-strip Technicolor cameras, so there were THREE separate strips of film passing through TWO separate cameras to get this one in 3-D. Beautiful print and colors.


The guest speakers included art director Henry Bumstead, writer Hal Walker, Dean's daughter Dina and actress Pat Crowley (Jerry's girl in the movie). Jerry sent a telegram thanking us for our interest in this 50 year old film and regrets that he could not be there.
 
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