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I'm looking at by a new Integra reciever. My current reciever is 7 years old and has only 1 24 bit processor. I'm torn between the 50.1 & 70.1 Integras. I do like that the 70 has a better video processor but I also notice the 70.1 has 3 32-Bit DSP Chip for Advanced Processing. Where as the 50.1 has only 2 32-Bit DSP Chip for Advanced Processing. My question is what does the extra 32 processor do/run. Get as technical as you can. Thanks guys.


-Alan
 

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This is only needed for sound effects like jazz and hall,, mostly music. Movies in dd hd or dts hd DSP not needed so much, but still good to have.
 

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^^^


that would be incorrect... dsp chips are used for a lot more than just creating the "advanced" surround modes...


to the op... without knowing which chips and how the cem implemented them, we can only "guess"...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ox1216 /forum/post/18313521


I'm looking at by a new Integra reciever. My current reciever is 7 years old and has only 1 24 bit processor. I'm torn between the 50.1 & 70.1 Integras. I do like that the 70 has a better video processor but I also notice the 70.1 has 3 32-Bit DSP Chip for Advanced Processing. Where as the 50.1 has only 2 32-Bit DSP Chip for Advanced Processing. My question is what does the extra 32 processor do/run. Get as technical as you can. Thanks guys.


-Alan

I will get somewhat technical, and it won't help much. There are two main considerations.


The first is how much processing power a receiver could possibly need. So if you turn on Audyssey, some sort of dynamic volume processing, play and decode a Dolby TrueHD track, and apply Dolby Pro Logic IIx how much processing power is needed?


In many cases, a receiver's DSP will have to make compromises, such as being restricted to 48 khz.


The other consideration is the exact DSP processing capability, which you can't evalulate easily. Depending on clock rate, and model, they will all differ.


So you would need to read the receiver manual to determing what it's DSP limitations are, such as having to down sample to 48 khz.


Forget about bits. That's referring to the internal word size of the processor. That's a technical aspect marketers like to throw around, that tells you nothing as a consumer. I believe most modern DSPs use processors with a 32 bit word size. I believe floating point DSPs are now standard, and are probably needed to decode lossless audio. I would assume 32 bit floating point numbers are standard, but I guess some DSPs could use 64 bit floating point numbers, but I don't think it's important to know this.


The bottom line is that you should not worry about the type and model and number of DSPs in your receiver.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman /forum/post/18314523


I will get somewhat technical, and it won't help much. There are two main considerations.


The first is how much processing power a receiver could possibly need. So if you turn on Audyssey, some sort of dynamic volume processing, play and decode a Dolby TrueHD track, and apply Dolby Pro Logic IIx how much processing power is needed?


In many cases, a receiver's DSP will have to make compromises, such as being restricted to 48 khz.


The other consideration is the exact DSP processing capability, which you can't evalulate easily. Depending on clock rate, and model, they will all differ.


So you would need to read the receiver manual to determing what it's DSP limitations are, such as having to down sample to 48 khz.


Forget about bits. That's referring to the internal word size of the processor. That's a technical aspect marketers like to throw around, that tells you nothing as a consumer. I believe most modern DSPs use processors with a 32 bit word size. I believe floating point DSPs are now standard, and are probably needed to decode lossless audio. I would assume 32 bit floating point numbers are standard, but I guess some DSPs could use 64 bit floating point numbers, but I don't think it's important to know this.


The bottom line is that you should not worry about the type and model and number of DSPs in your receiver.

A couple of clarifications..

The TI and ADI DSPs are floating point and the Cirrus Logic DSPs are fixed point. Think about the DSP power much like Intel processors in PCs, about every 2 years the power of the processors double.. Also clock frequency and on-board memory are crucial as well as these are increased...


Bottom line..

The DSPs used in todays HDMI 1.3 AVRs are very powerful but the most critical factor for loading the DSP is DTS Master Audio which is a loss-less HD codec. Since most Blu-rays and HD source material are 5.1 and 48kHz, the AVRs can handle this OK but as one steps up to 96kHz and 7.1 one can easily run out of processor power especially in budget-priced AVRs
 

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Do any lossless decoding receivers have fixed point DSPs?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman /forum/post/18331181


Do any lossless decoding receivers have fixed point DSPs?

Michael..


The Marantz and HK AVRs below $1099 SRP use Cirrus Logic DSPs and are fixed point, their higher price-point AVRs use TI DSPs and are floating point. Also some of the just announced new HDMI 1.4 AVRs which will be shipping soon are using the latest Cirrus Logic DSPs (CS 49800) and are fixed point as well..


Just my $0.01...
 
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