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Just a quick question, i have a friend of my planning his home theatre project and i'm wondering whats a good projector to use for a throw distance of 30ft and what size screen would be best suited for viewing ? The ratio really doesn't matter.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts
 

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I hope he's planning on an expensive projector... Even for $10k+ models with optional long throw lenses, that is a long way...

Suggest he find a different solution to place the pj closer.
 
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what will be the distance from the back of the chairs to the screen? How many seats?

A residential projector suitable for 30 ft throw is rare and expensive. Digital Projection will have a projector with a long throw lens option, plan around $30K +/-


normal throw is 16-22 +/- depends on screen size, lets start there first, define seating and how large the screen wall is.
 

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The seating he's looking in two rows with three seats and the wall dimension or screen intended to use is FAVI 200 inch 16:9 Electric Projector Screen (174" x 98")
 

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too big. Get a smaller screen put the two rows of 3 chairs closer, move the projector forward and save 75% on your equipment budget. If this is a dedicated theater space, skip the retractable screen they are notorious for not staying flat.
 

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The seating he's looking in two rows with three seats and the wall dimension or screen intended to use is FAVI 200 inch 16:9 Electric Projector Screen (174" x 98")
The Benq HC1200 has the brightness and color accuracy for a 200" screen from 30' throw or closer. Closer throw always translates into brighter for a given projector, so if possible, 20' throw would be max brightness for the HC1200.

Front row seats should not be closer than 15' from a 200" screen which puts a second row at 22', and the screen will be 15' wide so only 3 seats per row seems odd, but whatever floats your boat.
 

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As a reference: I have a 160" screen with an epson 5000 series projector and at 23 foot throw distance, I wish the projector was brighter, particularly for whiter scenes and daylight scenes.

next time I build a room, I am putting the projector in to the ceiling closer to the screen with the entire ceiling designed specifically to house the projector inside a flush mounted hush box. It will constitute an "upside down riser" approach. I will cool the thing using the space inside the ceiling and have a piece of glass covering the apparatus for a better hush box experience.
 

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As a reference: I have a 160" screen with an epson 5000 series projector and at 23 foot throw distance, I wish the projector was brighter, particularly for whiter scenes and daylight scenes.

next time I build a room, I am putting the projector in to the ceiling closer to the screen with the entire ceiling designed specifically to house the projector inside a flush mounted hush box. It will constitute an "upside down riser" approach. I will cool the thing using the space inside the ceiling and have a piece of glass covering the apparatus for a better hush box experience.
Hey blazar, do you have a link or picture of this, I am intrigued
 

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no picture handy, but imagine your ceiling steps down similar to how a riser for home theater seats steps up. You would not see the projector at all from the sitting position since it will be inside the "riser" with the face of the riser having an opening for the projector. That opening can be covered with glass or plexiglass to reduce sound from the projector.

You could put cross ventilation fans for ducts inside the "riser" with airflow going to left to right out of the room and these fans could be in the attic. You have the fans turn on when the projector is on.

This way the entire projector chamber is really not "inside the room" and therefore won't contribute much if any noise to the listening position despite the fact that the projector is just above your head. Sitting position is around 12-16 feet from the screen in most cases so this might help lumens.

Hopefully that clarifies a bit...

Mounting the projector closer to the screen increases dramatically the number of low cost projector options, but also the new cool and quiet laser illuminated projectors which are not particularly very bright.
 

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no picture handy, but imagine your ceiling steps down similar to how a riser for home theater seats steps up. You would not see the projector at all from the sitting position since it will be inside the "riser" with the face of the riser having an opening for the projector. That opening can be covered with glass or plexiglass to reduce sound from the projector.
I am currently debating this exact thing in my build.... among to many other things LOL
The thought is to have a deep enough soffit to house the projector, but the location aesthetically is what is messing me up
Hope to post a couple options that have been rolling around in my head on this soon.
I also see a con in that if you upgrade the projector in the future you are tied to that distance
 

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True about being tied to distance but a vast majority of projectors are built to be parked about 16 feet from the screen. This standard won't change at any point due to typical room sizes...

In other words, it is a non-issue in my view.

This plan of mine assumes a high ceiling (12 feet) so that the step down in the ceiling is not really noticable. Also the screen should be around 2ft from the ground in this setup so that the step down ceiling does not obscure the screen if you are standing in the back of the room.

I really hate the "projector hanging from the ceiling" look. i also think massive hushboxes hanging from the ceiling are quite ugly.

If you get really creative with ceiling surfaces, you could hide the projector amongst other ceiling design elements. This could get pricey for fancy woodwork etc but could also serve as diffusive surfaces for the room.

Right now I have my projector inside the back wall above the entry doors. The position is great for everything including aesthetics but the throw distance brightness is the only potential limit.

One advantage of a long throw distance is that the reflection of the image off the screen is VERY uniform and "on-axis" which is not always the case with shorter throw situations.

Another concept I had was to simply have a "projection room" if I am wealthy enough to buy one of those huge theater grade projectors. Perhaps ebay might have something. A projection room approach would allow you to silence and cool the projector and seal the entire space away while providing easy access. Perhaps the equipment rack could be parked there as well.

I am very much a stickler for very quiet noise floor setups and currently the projector is the most noisy thing along with air conditioning units in many dedicated theater rooms.
 

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not done yet but here is a soffit pocket. The throw is about 19 ft to a 150 inch wide screen.
 

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not done yet but here is a soffit pocket. The throw is about 19 ft to a 150 inch wide screen.
Mine is very similar, 160" screen, 23ft throw. I wish I had another 1000lumens....

Most of the sweet spot price HT projectors at $3000 or below don't have enough brightness.

You get higher brightness with data projectors but then you get other compromises such as inadequate lens shifting, worse contrast, etc.

Doing 10k+ projectors isnt usually my cup
Of tea
 

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As a general rule of thumb, you should not exceed projector lens height beyond the top of the screen. You are taking a lot of risks if you do. Further, not having adequate ventilation around the projector, active thermal management or not, you also run the risk of overheating the projector. My two cents FWIW. One well known company makes a fantastic projector for around the $10k mark. Extremely bright, around 32 ft Lamberts calibrated, with several lens options. I recently worked with one and its bright enough to have the lights on if so inclined, and calibrated gray scale, CMS and gamma beautifully.
 

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Yes, great points, particularly the issue of not mounting the projector too high with respect to the screen.
 
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