AVS Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is probably on the forums somewhere.. but is there an yresearch on how 3D tv effects the eyes. I just remember reading something about the nintendo 3ds( i knwo its different technology) being possibly bad for kids especially.

Im not sure how much ill use 3d if i get a tv. but just something im wondering about before i shop around
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,021 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by peatreat
this is probably on the forums somewhere.. but is there an yresearch on how 3D tv effects the eyes. I just remember reading something about the nintendo 3ds( i knwo its different technology) being possibly bad for kids especially.

Im not sure how much ill use 3d if i get a tv. but just something im wondering about before i shop around
Do a forum search for "3D eyestrain" and you will find everything you need to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
Most of what you will find on the Internet re this is exaggerated speculation. Eye fatigue from shutter glasses is will documented, but like rainbow effect, it bothers some people a lot and the rest hardly notice. Another source of fatigue comes when movie makers use too much extreme in the 3d coming too close and or too far into the distance, especially if they us both at once. That is easily avoided but all of the research reporting fatigue in 3d uses extremes in the 3d that a good movie maker would never use. So, yes 3d can give eye fatigue, if you try hard enough.


As for brain damage or vision damage - no. This is where the anti3d crowd is most irresponsible. Not ever has there been the first scientific finding of damage from watching 3d.


Would I put 3d glasses on a toddler? Nope. Common sense tells me that 3d is for people with their visual system developed. I would release kids to 3d somewhere around the age of 3years, just to be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,441 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by peatreat /forum/post/20814483


...how 3D tv effects the eyes...

I watched 3D last night and within 5 minutes my right eyeball pop out
and fell on the floor.
I managed to pop it back in and all seems to be working well and finished my movie. From what I've read about 60% of 3D views have thas happen at least once per 5 hours of 3D viewing. That is the only known small inconvenience associated with viewing 3D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,021 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by William /forum/post/20817472


I watched 3D last night and within 5 minutes my right eyeball pop out
and fell on the floor.
I managed to pop it back in and all seems to be working well and finished my movie. From what I've read about 60% of 3D views have thas happen at least once per 5 hours of 3D viewing. That is the only known small inconvenience associated with viewing 3D.

That's just what I'm looking for, "eye popping" 3D! What kind of equipment are you using?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
The only side effect I've ever noticed is something I call "3d holdover"... After extended 3d viewing, when I take the glasses off, everything around me - cars, buildings, even other people - seem to stand out from the background, almost like I could reach out and touch them...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
It probably has come up, but i'm not sure why i've never seen it.


In everyday life, your eyes "cross" and "expand" depending on the distance of the subject. Simultaneously, your eyes change focus. Common sense right?


When viewing 3D movies, your eyes still "cross" and "expand" depending on the perceived distance, but your eyes have to stay focused on the one single plain, your TV.


This is what gives people head aches or eye strain. My personal theory, is that as you teach your eyes how keep a constant focus no matter the perceived distance, the strain goes away. I also do not believe this will in any way have a negative long term effect. Study's have been done in years past (well before this current craze) that have even suggested that the exercise improves eye muscles for your benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
Yes, the fact that we must keep our eyes focused on the screen plane while converging on a different plane is cited by Roger Ebert and other critics of 3D as being some fatal flaw. They have even said it goes against our evolution. Nonetheless, research has shown that as long as movie makers avoid using the extremes of close in and far away, the mismatch between focal point and convergence point doesn't hurt at all. Supporters of 3D have pointed out that everyone in their 50s and older don't have much flexibility in their focus anyway, so they are walking around with their eyes focused at some middle distance while converging on subjects near and far away all the time. So, this focus and convergence thing, although perfectly true, is overblown by the 3D critics.


There are many other aspects of film and video that do not match the way we see things in the real world. We have the flicker that comes with 24 frames per second, we have things on the screen deliberately out of focus - usually in the background - that we cannot bring into focus with our eyes. We have black and white movies. None of those things cause headaches, eye strain, or brain damage. People picking on 3D are overdoing it a little bit.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,411 Posts
First of all we see with our brains, not our eyes, and eye-brain manipulation can be amazing. For example, there are contacts that allow one eye to see near and the other far--and the brain makes it work (visual cortex--google it). There are others that have bifocals built-in that move around the eye when you look up or down and the brain will compensate. The fixed focus issue has been discussed lots and no one knows the lasting effect, but we do know--the brain compensates.


The one big issue you have to look out for (especially for kids) is that since each eye is seeing a different image off of a screen, that those images are not farther apart than the distance between normal eye centers. If so, your eyes must diverge out from center and this causes a lot of muscle strain--especially in anyone young, whose head has not fully developed. Some 3D films compensate for this by not allowing the image for distant objects to widen more than 2.5 inches. The distance of your head to the screen makes a difference as well, as this width becomes less noticeable the farther away you are.


The other problem is flickering of shutterglasses, since the right eye and left eye are shut off when the other is on. This can cause a seizure in some people, again especially kids.


And, in the realm of amazing--scientists have done experiments where people wear optical glasses that invert the image to each eye. After several days, the wearers have indicated the images turn right-side up and they can see normally again. When they take the glasses off, the images to each are seen upside down, and they have to go through a couple of days to adjust back to normal--amazing...again, our brains adjust. http://www.spiritalchemy.com/blog/se...nus-experiment
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top