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I'm going to show my ignorance here but...

It seems like it should be possible to watch 3D movies on a 2d TV with shutter glass and a device that parses the 3D source signal into its alternating images and sends them to the TV while also sending the shutter information to the glasses.

Does anyone sell a product such as this?
 

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Gene Dolgoff has mentioned that he can provide the technology to do just this kind of thing. He has tried to raise funds, but I don't think he got enough contributions to launch it. I might be wrong on this latter point as it's been a while since I read up on his efforts.
 

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There are also "field sequential" 3D systems that worked on old-style interlaced CRT sets as well as a handful of movies on DVD that took advantage of this process like Ben Stassen's "ride" 3D features (ENCOUNTERS IN THE THIRD DIMENSION, ALIEN ADVENTURE, HAUNTED CASTLE). They were impressive, but the 3D flickered and the resolution was much less than that offered by current Blu-ray 3D. I still wish these Stassen features would be redone with modern video technology and released on Blu-ray 3D. I remember seeing some brief demo clips from a couple of these films in 1080P 3D and being very impressed by them.
 

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In theory you can do frame sequential... A 1080p50/60 display mode can display 25 or 30 frames in stereo. The hard part is converting the 24 fps content to 30fps.
 

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The device is old, called NVidia 3d Vision, and AFAIK, is not worth it on display devices with refresh rate of less than 85Hz (common is 60Hz), due to resulting flicker. There are (relatively)newer adapters that can feed 120Hz signal to displays that can accept it.
 

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VIP (Video Innovation Products) has sold boxes that do exactly that for a number of years now. They aren't exactly inexpensive, must be used with active shutter glasses and emitters, and as Roussi alluded to, flicker is an issue for many people. 60 Hz sets must display the left eye/right eye images alternately which adds up to 30 Hz per eye. The "120 Hz" and "240 Hz" sets won't help as the majority just take a regular 60 Hz input signal and add interpolated data to produce smooth motion. Having said this, we have their boxes on both of our TVs and are very happy with them. Flicker has never been a big issue for us, but YMMV.
 
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