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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have asked twice before, but never got an answer and I am still confused, so hopefully someone can chime in and save me hundreds of dollars before I make a massive mistake.

I am about to build my dream theatre within a small room that is already complete. I can NOT rip out the drywall, but I do want to soundproof to the best of my ability.

If I have a square room already drywalled and want to soundproof, what is the best way? My idea is as follows:

1)Nail 1 inch X 1 inch wood strips along the top and sides of wall framing the wall.

Get mass load vinyl (Accousti-bloc) or roofing vinyl: 1 lbs per sq/ft and nail it onto the 1 inch railing and tape the seams, so it hangs loosly.


or


2)Nail it directly onto wall and caulk seems.


Then I was going to sound treat the room per Ethan's brilliant article; by making my own 1 or 2" thick rigid fiberglass boards and mounting them onto the 1" railings so I maintain a gap as recommended.


Big question:


Is the vinyl a COMPLETE waste of time and money?


If not, which way to mount: nailed to wall and caulked or loose on frame.


Thank you very much guys, I appreciate any answers and any suggestions.


My dream theatre is about to begin on Monday.
 

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What are the dimensions of the room (including height)? Square rooms can be really hard to get sounding nice - same with small rooms.


Ethan's goodies are for sound treatment - which is NOT soundproofing. Those, along with all the stuff on modes and room dimensions, are mostly about how things sound inside the room. They don't have nearly as much impact on how much sound escapes the room.


For soundproofing, you need to keep the sound from getting out. Part of that happens by keeping your room from "leaking" - i.e. lots of caulk, etc.. basically making it airtight. Part of it comes from reducing mechanical transfer - sound hitting drywall which is fastened to your home's frame will let the sound's energy travel through your whole house. Decoupling your surfaces from the frame (floating floors/ceiling, resilient channel for walls, etc) helps with that.


As for the vinyl, I've had good results with the roll roofing material, but laminated in drywall (not hanging loose). I don't think that in of itself would be a costly mistake. However, rushing in to building out your room before you've really planned the details and researched what it takes to get what you want can be a massively expensive fiasco... Make sure you know what you want (and how your design should help you get it) before you start building it!


I know, "I hate waiting"...


- james
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks James.

My room dimensions are:


8' tall X 13' wide X 13 long. Bummer, but it is square, with a 6X 5 room open in the back side left.


Since I can NOT decouple the room, how do you recommend I apply the vinyl? Also, which vinyl is best, Home Depot roof stuff? Thanks so much.
 

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Well I'm not an expert, and I haven't seen numbers on Acoustiblock or how much it costs..but if you're looking at sound containment, I'm wondering if you would get better results by using the money towards a resilient channel or sound isolation clips instead of acoustiblock.
 

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adidadi-


Both are methods to decouple the drywall from the studs. Sound causes the drywall to vibrate, and when the drywall is screwed to the studs, the vibrations can carry through the wall and out the other side. When you decouple the wall using resilient channel or other means, the walls can vibrate somewhat freely.


There are a few different types of resilient channels and isolation clips. Some may work better than others. How much of a difference they make is debated daily here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you for the suggestion. After discussing the entire process with them; I have learned that you have to do it perfectly, or don't bother at all. It is like water and the path of least resistance. Any cracks anywhere, and the room is no longer soundproofed. I would basically have to build boxes for my recessed light cans and decouple those and ensure they are sealed. Plus install double doors, so it is a MONUMENTAL task. I have resigned the whole idea.

What I will do is weatherstrip all door and window points and sandwich my glass panes between acoustic board and fiberglass insulation and try and minimize escaping sound.

Thanks for all your help.
 
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