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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my dvd player is currently set to ouput 48 12 , whats this other option for



ive heard that lord of the rings has 96 24 , on the dts track


im not sure of this , but is it better osund or something ,


or do i just need to leave it all alone
 

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I don't know the exact concept but do know that 96 sounds better than 48.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok , ill set it to that then
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kirtis_mcleskey
my dvd player is currently set to ouput 48 12 , whats this other option for



ive heard that lord of the rings has 96 24 , on the dts track


im not sure of this , but is it better osund or something ,


or do i just need to leave it all alone


Haven't heard of any LOTR versions having DTS 96/24. There are not many titles with DTS 96/24. They are mainly restricted to music titles DVDs or DVD-As. The only movie I know with DTS 96/24 is the new version of Phantom of The Opera Region 2 & 3.
 

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Basically, the higher number will be the sampling rate... effectively how detailed a recording is in the time domain, how many times it takes a reading each second. The standard rate for AV stuff is 48,000 times a second or 48KHz (CD music is at 44.1). Hi definition audio is at 96KHz. What this means in real terms is that you will be able to hear sounds that are twice as high... the highest audible frequency is half the sampling rate... so 24KHz for a 48KHz recording and 48 for a 96 recording... the thing is... humans can really only hear up to 20KHz... and that degrades with age anyway. The jury is still out on as to whether there is any other benefits to hi def sound... personally i think it was just pushed by the equipment manufacturers to sell us new stuff. I mean, even if we COULD hear that high, most hifi speakers don't playback sound above 20KHz anyway :/ Technical specs in your speaker manual will have a frequency response with a range of reproducable frequencies in it...


The other number is the bit depth and is how detailed the amplitude is. 24bit means that there are 2 to the power of 24 increments of amplitude. In real world terms it means you'll get slightly less noise... but, again being cynical, you'd only REALLY need that much bit depth for classical music with the volume turned right up because it has so much dynamic range. The standard AV bit depth is 16... i have no idea where it's getting the number 12 from... 12 bit recording was used in some old drum machines back in the eighties but it certainly isn't used in modern digital recording.


So there you go... 24bit 96KHz is definately technically better than 16/48... whether you'll actually hear any difference is another matter :)


all the best
 
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