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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after many weeks of reading through the various encoding threads, and basically hitting my head against the wall with failure after failure, something finally clicked the other night. For the first time, I was able to use the tools and methods that were described in many different places here together, and I am quite happy.


Most of what I learned came from these threads and the doom9 forums, but the info was all over the place. The main HDTV WM9 by jsaliga was a huge help when it came along. However, it did not specifically spell out how to use the DVD2AVI/AVISynth/VirtualDubMod/WM9 VCM method since it was not possible when that thread was created. I will try to put together a step by step for encoding using the above tools at a level that hopefully will allow someone who is not familiar at all with any of the tools listed above. I am sure this will contain some mistakes, and I defer to the more experienced encoders (jsaliga, sjchmura, trbarry and others) who were the real trailblazers on this method. I am gleaning off their knowledge, and hopefully putting it together in a manner so it can be understood by a novice.


The main reason for following this method is to get the benefit of the using the WM9 video codec while maintaining the AC3 audio for passthrough to your receiver. Although Blight has fixed the multichannel

WMA issue in his latest ZoomPlayer build (previously, the only way to play back multichannel WMA was through WMP, which lacks the controllability of ZP), not everyone has a audio card with 6 analog outs and a receiver with 6 analog in. This method allows you to simply use your digital output and receiver to decode the sound. Another great advantage of this method is to utilize the powerful capabilities of AVI Synth. I won’t go into it here, but this tool can greatly improve the compressibility and quality of your source. There is an excellent help file in the AVISynth package, and their web page ( www.avisynth.org ) is a great resource. These two features provide a more complete and controllable encoding process than using WMEncoder.


This outline not meant to provide the deepest knowledge on all the steps. Rather, I want it to allow folks to get this process working and then as they get better, to experiment with the many options on their own. One thing to note is that I currently do not have an HD capture card, so my source files are all dvd-based VOBs. For this thread, I am assuming that you can get the VOBs off the dvd. If you need help on that step, please see the excellent Ripping 101 post.


From what I have read, the steps involved in encoding .ts and .vob files are the same, with a few small differences in the settings of the tools. Rather than misrepresent the specifics, I am posting reference links to other threads discussing the details of HDTV encoding. Refer to the main HDTV WM9 thread for some information on the various AC3 fixing programs for problems with HDTV audio feeds. As these are not normally a problem with DVD rips, I will not cover them here.


Without further ado, this is what works for me. I would recommend trying these steps on a DD trailer VOB as they will process quickly.

Tools:

Get the VCM wrapper for WM9

This lets you put WM9 files into an AVI container with AC3 sound.


Get some sort of DivX codec . This was screwing me up earlier. You need this to view the YU12 information that the basic avs files output, and windows doesn’t handle this natively. You only need the codec, not the player


Get the following file for VirtualDubMod (VDM) and unzip it to its own directory. Note this is a brand new release and has been updated to the VirtualDub 1.5 code. As such, it probably has a few bugs, but the improved functionality is nice. As with many of these programs, they mature quickly. Read more about it here to keep up with the latest releases.


Get AVI Synth 2.5 . Run the installer program

DVD2AVIT3

– supports HD, but also works with VDM 1.5 and AVI Synth 2.5

Filters:

Get the freeware AC3Filter from doom9 and run the installer.


Put the following filters into your AVI Synth plugin folder. More goods ones to be found here

Decomb
SimpleResize
Undot
MPEG2DEC3


Test It Out

At this point, you should have what you need to get started. As a first test, create a basic script as follows. Save it as an .avs script, and change the path to match your install:


Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\mpeg2dec3.dll")

Version()


Drag the file onto zoom player, and it should play a 10 second file with the version information displayed. If it doesn’t work, or gives you some errors about can't find filters or can't load something, then you didn’t do the install correctly. As a second check ,open the same .avs file in VDM (don’t choose ‘Open file via avi synth’, just directly open the .avs file). You should also see the version information displayed in VDM. If you have gotten this far, you are ready to start with a real file.

Create .D2V File

Open DVD2AVI. Open the vob’s from your ripped dvds. If you select the first one, it will autoselect all of them. Just click on OK from the menu to import them all. There is a great article here on the various methods of deinterlacing. A good read for more knowledge.


There are two ways to handle the inverse telecine (IVTC). One is directly from DVD2AVI, and the other is through filters when making your avs script. The guidelines call for you to preview the movie, and if it says > 95% film, you can force film directly in DVD2AVI. However, the guide listed above tells you when this sometimes doesn’t work. One thing to be safe is to just do the IVTC in the avs script. It might be a bit slower overall, but I have had better results.


--5/29/03 edit--


this edit should replace the info directly following in the 5/5 edit. We all learn! Bascially, I have changed the way I perform IVTC on mixed content movies. If you do a test run in DVD2AVI and it stays very high (like 98-100%), then you should be fine using ForceFilm. However, if it is in the mid to low 90s, then you have more video content mixed in. For the Xfiles episodes, the content flips from film to video every time a subtitle appears. So if you have an instance where an actors name appears at the same time as a camera pan, using ForceFilm will cause this scene to be jerky as long as the camera moves. I have made a change to the sample .avs scripts below to handle this content. Also, you should get the updated Decomb packages above (updated from beta 2 to beta 4)


--end 5/29/03 edit--


--5/5/03 edit--. After playing with a few other sources, I have had mixed success with always doing the IVTC in the avs script. One source (xfiles, which showed 96% film) had smoother pans when IVTC from the avs script. Another source (Toy Story, showed 99% film) did better on pans when I set DVD2AVI to Force Film. Probably the easiest thing to do is to make a .d2v file with both methods and encode a short scene with a pan from both. This step only takes a few minutes (even less since you can reuse the same AC3 file for either .d2v source), so it might be worth saving a few hours of encoding to make sure your pans are smooth.


I will make reference where these changes affect downstream processing by marking the comments -- end 5/5 edit--


So in DVD2AVI, select the following options:

* Video > Field Operation > None OR Force Film (see 5/29 edit above)

* Audio > Track Number > Don't process Audio

* Audio > Channel Format > Auto Select

* Audio > Dolby Digital > Demux All Tracks


Leave the rest of the settings to their default, and don’t worry about cutting anything here. We can do that more easily in VDM. Hit F4 to save the project. In this example, the file will be called TombRaider.d2v This will produce a .d2v file and an .ac3 file. At this point, you can close DVD2AVI. If you didn’t strip the streams, you might end up with multiple ac3 files. Play the files in ZoomPlayer to make sure you pick the right one (i.e. English).


For some additional information on HDTV and DVD2AVI, see this thread .

Create .avs Script

Now that we have our d2v file, we are ready to create a new avs script like the following. Make sure to change the paths and filenames to match your files.


--5/29/03 edit-- I am changing the parameters on the Telecide and Decimate calls to help handle mixed content. This happens on many TV shows and results in better handling of the mixed 24 fps film (which should be IVTC) and 30 fps video content (which should be deinterlaced) in the vobs. These parameters worked well for me. Even if you don't have any video, you can still use these - they will not negatively affect true 24 fps IVTCing --end edit--


the script is located between the lines of dashes. Don't copy the dashes :)


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\mpeg2dec3.dll")

Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\undot.dll")

Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\simpleresize.dll")

Mpeg2source("C\\:TombRaider.d2v", cpu=4) # see mpeg2dec3 help file for more options


# performs the IVTC since we didn’t do it in DVD2AVI.

# These parameters handle mixed content better, but still work fine on film


Telecide(guide=1, gthresh=30, mthresh=3.0)


# removes extra frame from above.

# works with the above statement to correctly to handle mixed content


Decimate(mode=3, threshold=1.0)


# crop(?,?,?,?) # uncomment if you want to crop. See AVISynth help for syntax

Undot() # removes mosquito noise and helps to compress better during encoding

# SimpleResize(width,height) if you want to change the size of the file

----------------------------------------------------------------------------


5/5 edit - if you used Force Film during the DVD2AVI step described above, you would remove the Telecide and Decimate lines and use the following:


----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\mpeg2dec3.dll")

Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\undot.dll")

Loadplugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\simpleresize.dll")

Mpeg2source("C\\:TombRaider.d2v", cpu=4) # see mpeg2dec3 help file for more options

# crop(?,?,?,?) # uncomment if you want to crop. See AVISynth help for syntax

Undot() # removes mosquito noise and helps to compress better during encoding

# SimpleResize(width,height) if you want to change the size of the file

----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Note that there are many,many filters available for AVI Synth. Not all of them have been recompiled for v 2.5, and there are certainly folks who prefer certain resizing , noise removal, and sharpening filters over others. This will get you started, but for more reading, look in the AVISynth forums at doom9.


Save the file as TombRaider.avs or something. If you are saving from Notepad, make sure to select "*.* All files" rather than *.txt as the file type.

Open .avs File In VDM

Open up VDM and go to File > Open Video File. Select TombRaider.avs. This will open the file, and you should be looking at a replica of your movie. You can scroll through the movie using the bars to insure that all of the VOBs came over. If you want to edit out certain sections, scroll to the beginning of the area to cut (arrow keys move 1 frame at a time, alt-arrow moves 50 at a time), and hit Home. Scroll to the end of the edit section, and hit End. Then hit Delete to cut this part out. This is useful for getting rid of the movie studio intros, end credits, or if you are transcoding a tv series like x-files, the repeated opening montage. Once you have cut out all the pieces, click ctrl-left arrow to go to the beginning and then click Home to set the beginning point for the final encode. Then hit ctrl-right arrow to go to the end and hit End to mark the end. The seekbar should be blue, indicating that the entire movie (less the parts we already deleted) is selected.

Compression Settings

After your selection is done, we need to set up the compression. Navigate to Video and select Fast Recompress. This takes advantage of VDM’s ability to encode the data without a need for color conversion and speeds up the processing significantly. Navigate to Video > Compression and select ‘Microsoft Windows Media Video 9’. Click on Configure to set the options. You will recognize most of these settings, such as Compression type, VBR quality setting, and Performance slider. A good setting is One pass VBR, Quality 90, with Performance slider one click from the left.


If you use the same settings all the time, once you have them entered, you can save them. Do this by selecting the Save/Load tab and putting a full filename (e.g. "VBR 90.wv9") into the Filename and click Save Parameters. Make sure to include the .wv9. This will store your settings for later use. When you start up another session and want to use these settings, just go to the Save/Load tab, double click on your profile, and click Load Parameters. Don’t forget to click the Load Parameters – just double clicking the profile from the list won't do it. One thing to note – you should probably not do anything with the Preprocessing tab since those settings (IVTC, cropping, resize) are done in the avs script. Click OK until you are returned to the main screen.

Audio Selection

Next, we need to get the audio in. There are several processing options for converting the audio, but for this guide, we will be keeping the AC3 stream and just muxing it into the AVI container. For more info on converting to other formats, check out the VirtualDub and VDM forums at doom9.


The menus in VDM 1.5 have changed from the version 1.4. See the post above for the change log, but it is pretty intuitive. Navigate to Streams > Streams List. This shows a box with all streams. We need to add our .ac3 file from DVD2AVI, so we click on Add. Select the ac3 file (it will be something like TombRaider AC3 T01 3_2ch 448Kbps DELAY -66ms.ac3). The file will be loaded and show some basic information about the format. Right click on the file and make sure Direct Stream Copy is chosen. Next, select Interleaving, leave the Preload value at 500, change the 'Interleave audio every' setting to 32 ms, and set the value in the ‘Delay audio track by’ equal to the delay in the file name of your AC3 file. In this example, we would enter “-66†(without the quotes). Also, Make sure to include the sign. Click on OK twice to return to the main screen.


--5/7/03 edit: changed Interleave settings to 32 ms. See More on Smooth Pan Issue at bottom for additional information -- end edit

Ready To Encode

At this point, you should probably save your session. Navigate to File > Save Processing Settings. There is something that you have to do to be able view a preview of the file in the YV12 format, but I can't find it at the moment. I will edit when I do.


You are now ready to encode the file. Navigate to File > Save As and you will get the new dialog. For most purposes, all you have to do is enter the filename and hit Save. If you want to save to a segmented AVI file, then select the corresponding option. I don’t do this, so I don’t know anything more than what is there on the screen. Your file will be saved, and if all goes well, you should have a perfectly in-sync file.


Well, hopefully that will get you started. I believe that I have included all of the required file references and detailed the steps. Again, I want to thank the folks who have pioneered this method and the builders of the programs themselves. This is a fantastic forum, and I have enjoyed my time here.

A Few More Topics

Batch Mode and Job Control

One great option with VDM is the ability to queue things in batch mode. When you are in the Save As menu, there is a checkbox ‘Don’t run this job now…’. If you are running many a number of jobs, or are testing encoding parameters, this is a huge help. Unfortunately, it is broken in this alpha release. I think the developers have already fixed it, and it will be included in the next build. In the meantime, I can explain the process as it is quite simple. Just check the box and save it as normal. You will be returned to VDM where you can change settings or open another file. Each time when you are ready, save the file and make sure the ‘Don’t run this job now’ button is selected. After you have created several jobs and are ready to process the batch (such as late at night before going to bed), just navigate to File > Job Control (F4) and you will see the Job Control dialog. It is pretty self explanatory – just hit Start to begin encoding your jobs. You will notice that a popup window will be displayed showing the AC3 information. This will close itself after 10 seconds and the job will start, so you don’t have to worry about sitting up while it runs!

2 Pass Encoding

It took me a while to figure out how to do 2 pass encoding in VDM. The secret is adding the right files at the right time. When you go into the WM9 encoder properties, select 2 Pass Bit Rate VBR or 2 Pass Bit Rate VBR (Peak). Rather than choosing the Quality from the one pass VBR, you will need to enter the Bit Rate (in bits, so enter 1000000 for 1 mbps) and the Peak bit rate (for Peak). Secondly, click on the … button in the Log File next to First Pass. This will prompt you to save a .tmp file. Save it as something like ‘2 pass.tmp’. Click OK until you are back to the main screen. Now, you will have to save the AVI as described above. VDM will create an .avi file, but it is really just a dummy file. When it is done, return to the Compression screen. Click on the Second Pass radio button and select the .tmp file you saved in the first pass. Return to the main screen and save the AVI file again. This time, the real avi file will be saved based on the info in the first pass. This process is really helped out by the Batch Control described above. If you save the AVI as a different name, you can set up both passes in batch and then just run them at night without waiting for the first pass to finish.

Template files

Using template files was a bit strange at first. I kept trying to open an .avs file with a template, and it would screw up. The correct process is to open a source file such as a VOB, D2V, AVI, M2V, etc with the corresponding template. VDM will automatically create an avs file for your individual session. The template idea is pretty straight forward and useful if you convert a lot of files with the same settings. Some of the sample files that I have seen are for converting 720p tv shows from ABC, or 1080i movies from HBO-HD. The structure of a template file is the same as an .avs file with two differences. First, the 1st line must follow this format:


#ASYNTHER Your Description Here


Secondly, you replace your source file with the notation [%f]. For example, MPEG2Source("[%f]"). Enter all your other options (telecide, decimate, undot, etc) as in a normal .avs file, and save it in the VDM/template folder as an .avst file.


This will be the description that is shown in the Template drop down. Choose your template, then choose your source file to open.

Script Editor

If you have opened your file via a script (either .avs or .avst), you can edit the command directly from VDM. This is done through the menu path Tools > Script Editor. This will open up the script that you are working on. You can make changes (add filters, change settings) and then select Save and Refresh. This will essentially reopen your video file with the new settings. One thing to note, if you do this, and you have already cut out or marked sections of the file, they seem to be lost. I think this might be a bug and the developers are working on it.


As trbarry suggested, you should probably save your session settings before doing a 'Save and Refresh'. After the refresh, just load your settings back to get any cuts and settings back.

More on Smooth Pan Issue

After some further research, I determined that the choice of IVTC (either in avs script or through DVD2AVI) was not the culprit for the jerky motion of the resulting files. In fact, it has to do with the interleaving settings for the AC3 file. There are a few threads over on doom9 (see this one and also the thread it references for more detail). In short, jerky pans and audio cutouts can be caused by using the wrong interleaving settings.


There are three methods for dealing with this issue:


1. If you have not yet encoded your file, make sure to set the ‘Interleave every’ option in VDM to 32 ms. This proved to be very successful for smoothing out jerky pans without changing anything else in my configuration.


2. If you have encoded files already and are having issue with the pans, download and install the Reclock filter. Enabling Reclock helped fix some of the pan problems that I had been seeing. More info on Reclock is here . In fact, you might want to download this anyway as it seems to be a very useful and users have been getting good results.


3. The third option is to use AVIMux to fix old files and mux new ones. A users guide is located here . For existing files, follow the guide but just load your existing AVI and use it for both audio and video source. For new files, choose No Audio in VDM to encode just the video portion. Then open your new video only .avi file and the .ac3 file from DVD2AVI and follow the instructions in the guide. AVIMux apparently greatly reduces seeks to the CD/DVD drive if you burned the movie into a CDR of DVDR. While I don't do this, for those who do this is apparently a good thing.



That is all for now. I am sure there are some typos in there, but this process has worked well for me. I am still learning about different filters and trying to determine the ******l settings for different files, but at least I have this working.


Thanks

Kevin

--5/5 edits: added some info on using Force Film in the DVD2AVI section

--5/6 edits: replaced all start and end quotes with normal quotes. You should now be able to copy directly into notepad without issues

--5/7 edits: added information about the Interleave settings when saving AC3 sound in the AVI container.

--5/29 edits: additional info on handling of mixed content with DVD2AVI and .avs script parameters. also updated Decomb link.
 

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I have fallen way behind the endless sea of posts on the various forums regarding this subject. Let me ask, this method allows for video encoding using Media Encoder 9 and allows to keep the integrity of the original AC3 file without making the soundtrack wma? So I can play the finished file in Zoomplayer or Bsplayer and have true Dolby Digital 5.1 and still have the power of higher resolution WM9 video? I fell in love with the video results of 1440x480 encodes I did a while back but hated to dumb down the audio into the WMV format.
 

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I have looked around and can't find how to do what I am looking to do. Does anyone know where the "Dummy's Guide to WM9 Encoding" is? I have some TV shows I recorded with a WinTV PVR 250 (so the source is in MPEG 2 to start with and has only stereo sound.) Do I need to follow one of these complicated procedures just to encode these MPEG files in WM9??? Whenever I load my MPEG directly in WME9 it just crashes a few minutes into the encoding.


I was thinking I would start with encoding some easy stuff before I get my myHD card and want to encode some real video, but I am already lost. I am using the standard WME package with my MPEG decoder (Intervideo WinDVD4.) Can someone point out what parts of this guide can be left out to simplify if you don't need the high res and AC3 audio?
 

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summit3907 -


Great write up.


schulzpm -


Depending upon your file and audio format you might try loading them directly into Virtualdubmod and see if that works.


- Tom
 

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Summit - Excellent write up, I was thinking of doing the exact same thing on doom9's site but you saved me the effort.


I've done about 6 wm9 dvd rips now and they've all been perfect. The easiest way I've found to set up the encodes is to use gordian knot. Basically i load the d2v file, add the ac3 track, select the avi interleave setting, select divx 3.11 codec and 2 cd encode. This will then give me the desired bitrate. Then go to the resolution tab, and make it 1:1 resolution and select 720 x ???. then crop the black bars in the source window, and then hit save and encode. save & encode again, where it will ask me to save the .avs file. Once thats done, quit GK. Go in and edit the .avs file to remove the lancoz resize line (since i don't need to resize). Load up VDM and use the bitrate that GK gave me.


I then use zoom player to play my anamophoric dvd rips at the correct aspect ratio and they look soooooooo damn nice. For me, I find the quality at almost dvd quality.
 

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AAARRRGGGHHH!!!!


So after more frustration than I care to admit, I figure out that the reason my first test isn't working is that when you paste text like this into AVS scripts in notepad:


LoadPlugin("C:\\Program Files\\htpc\\AviSynth 2.5\\MPEG2Dec3.dll")

Version()


that the avsforum BBS software changes the quotes regular to start and end quotes, and that avisynth doesn't like that!!!


Lesson learned: if you're pasting directly from this most excellent post, delete the pasted quotes in notepad and put in your own.


Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
christur,


this actually is my 'fault'. i wrote the above post in MS word, which automatically changes the quotes to beginning and end, and then pasted into the forum. i never really thought that would cause a problem, and i didn't realize that notepad even supported start and end quotes. sorry for the frustration, as this post was supposed to prevent that!


for others, i have edited the post and replaced all quotes with normal ones. you should be able to paste the avs scripts directly without worrying about the quotes


k
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
fixed recommended settings for the Interleave settings when using AC3 audio. incorrect values can cause jerky playback during panning. see new subsection at bottom of post for ways to fix existing files.


k
 

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What environment do you use for playback, what player, what decoder, etc?



I'm having trouble playing the resulting files. I've tried it on machines with NVDVD, WinDVD, and AC3 filter on it using WMP and zoomplayer with no luck. On the machines with an MPEG decoder and not AC3 filter, WMP plays the video, but no audio, then displays an error message over it saying it can't play the file. When you click ok, the video stops! I can only get it to work on the machine I encoded on...
 

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Quote:
If you have opened your file via a script (either .avs or .avst), you can edit the command directly from VDM. This is done through the menu path Tools > Script Editor. This will open up the script that you are working on. You can make changes (add filters, change settings) and then select Save and Refresh. This will essentially reopen your video file with the new settings. One thing to note, if you do this, and you have already cut out or marked sections of the file, they seem to be lost. I think this might be a bug and the developers are working on it.
Kevin -


I don't know if it's a bug or not though I could imagine a scenario where changing your script made the delete section numbers wrong. But either way, if you anticipate doing a "save & refresh" you can first "save processing settings". Then after save&refresh you can load the processor settings which will remember the deleted sections.


- Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
trbarry - thanks for the tip. i'll add it above.


christur - not sure what to say. i have been able to play these on all machines that i use (5 different ones with diff config) with no problems at all. for the most part, i use windvd4 (v 4.0.11.83) and ac3filter.


a few questions - what are your source files? did you try this with one of the vob trailers? what versions of the dvd players do you have? what does zp do when you try to play it (what version of zp?) can you play the .avs files in zp?


some general things to try when stuff breaks - uninstall all your dvd players, and say 'yes' when it asks you to remove the .ax files. also uninstall any random .ax files (elecard). reinstall just windvd and ac3filter. try again.


if that doesnt work, try encoding a file with no audio. can you play that in wmp? in zp? can you play the ac3 file in zp? make sure you have the latest version of wmp as well.


is there anything different about the machine you encode on besides the fact the encoder is there?


k
 

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Hi,

I'm having trouble at "Open file in VDM" when trying to open the .avs file i get an error saying:


Avisynth open failure:

Plugin C:\\Program Files\\AviSynth 2.5\\plugins\\simpleresize.dll is not an AviSynth 2.5 plugin.


I followed every step before that and everything worked out fine until this. Simpleresize.dll is in the plugin folder for AviSynth. What am I doing wrong here?
 

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In the zip file on my site there are 2 different versions of the SimpleResize.dll file. Make sure you are using the one for Avisynth 2.5 that supports the YV12 format data. See:

www.trbarry.com/SimpleResize.zip


- Tom
 

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Kevin,


I have been using your guide with great success, thanks. You might want to check out the audio filters collection hosted on Doom9 right below the AC3Filter. I am able to use these filters instead of the AC3Filter and the volume is now back to a reasonable level because I can use any of the ac3 filters that come with the software DVD players.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
mpenton,


glad this is helping you.


one thing about the filters you mention on doom9 - they are basically very old versions of windvd's audio filters (the file named iviaudio.ax is actually version 1.0.0.1!). the ac3filter is simply an alternative to having to buy one of the normal dvd programs to get the required audio functionality. you can certainly use any audio filter from a commercial dvd player (windvd, cyberlink, nvdvd) if the volume levels produced by the free ac3filter are an issue. one thing to note - ac3filter has a 'gain' function that lets you turn the volumn up from within the decoder. i haven't tested to see if this causes any audio quality loss, but it is an option.


however, i would not recommend using the filters in the file you reference as they are very old. in fact, you might want to search your computer for iviaudio.ax and make sure that the old version is not installed (assuming you have a newer version which you should use instead). just right click, select properties, and view the version number. all new ones should be version 4 something. if it is not, then you might want to delete the old ones and register the new ones.


thanks,

kevin


ps - made a quick edit regarding mixed film/video files and added new telecide, decimate parameters
 

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Shucks, I was excited by the avi splitter that is with the audio pack and didn't even consider installing the old InterVideo audio filter. Without that I couldn't get a filter graph made that would allow the use of any of the DVD filters already on my system since the splitter is not installed by windvd, sonic or powerdvd. I also found that the gain setting on the AC3Filter was not functional (even at max gain I needed 2/3 volume to get to a normal level instead of the normal 1/4).


Cheers...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
are you sure the splitter is not there? i have never heard of someone who didnt have the splitter. what operating system are you on? maybe you should try to get graphedit and drop a vob into it. i am pretty sure all ms os come with a splitter. even if it doesnt, the dvd player has to have one, otherwise it would not be able to play any dvds! my comments were to the old windvd filter in the pack - if you are just using the splitter, then it should be fine. but that should be unnecessary.


the gain works fine for me. i am using xp and a revo. when i crank up the gain, it makes a significant difference. make sure you are using the latest version (.68b i think)


k
 
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