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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I recently purchased an Iscan Pro to use with my non-anamorphic DVDs and more importantly, my laserdiscs.


I do not thing it improved the picture that much.


My equipment is:


Mitsu. 65907 HDTV

Pioneer CLD-704 LD player (using composite out)

Toshiba SD6200 DVD player (progressive player)


Also, which do you guys think would be better for anamorphic DVDs:


Keep the Toshiba DVD player on Progressive mode

or

Switch it to Interlaced mode and let the Iscan take care of it?


I have compared the two and have not seen a big difference.


I heard using the Iscan as the doubler instead of the one built in my Mitsubishi would give me a better picture but I honestly do not think it has.


My TV has been ISF calibrated too.


Please let me know and thanks.


-JW
 

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Welcome to the dissapointment in the Iscan Pro club :(


Seriously, unless your display has a really poor internal doubler, I don't think you will see much of a difference with the Iscan. I would use the progressive out on your Toshiba directly into the Mitsubishi.


Either return the Iscan or hold on to it for when you get a set or projector that has a really bad internal processing. I have tried it on every set I have purchased and finally found a home for it processing the NTSC and Sat signals going into my Seleco HT200DM where it does make a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I heard that the internal line doubler on the Mitsu 65907 was not too good but I guess it is ok.


I see a very SLIGHT difference with the Iscan Pro (little less jaggies and I mean just a LITTLE).


I will still toy with it, any other suggestions?


-JW
 

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Gruson :


your iScan will be perfect for watching laserdiscs. But since your DVD player has a progressive output, the iScan will not improve (greatly) your picture on a DVD source.


One reason to use the iScan, though, would be to have only one output to the projector, and you could wire all your sources to the iScan (either directly if you don't exceed the YUV/S/Composite capacity of the device, either by switching all or parts of your inputs via your receiver).


The iScan doubler will by no mean be weaker than your toshiba progressive output : theiScan is one of the best line doublers as we talk. BUT it's not a miracle device : it converts interlaced video to progressive signals, it's not a scaler, nor a tripler or quadrupler. It's basically comparable to any progressive output (given this output handles the pulldown and mode detection as the iScan Pro does). But it's an external device, meaning you can feed your VCR, Game box or Laserdisc into it.
 

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I think the Mitsu doublers are basic bob type doubler with no buffer memory for field comparision.


Try look at diagnol lines moving across the screen at a slow to moderate rate. Jaggles should be easy to see.


Look at stationary scene with diagnol details, you would see the bobbing doubler cause the line to be slightly more diffuse at the edges.


As far as the progressive scan output, the Iscan offers real time de-interlacing based on what it observes, instead of what the flag indicates on the DVD.
 

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I agree with the above post in that I think the iScan will be much better at determining whether it should be in film or video mode than the 6200 will. That being said, I think you would have a hard time determining the difference between the iScan's output and that of the 6200 when they are both in the correct mode. If you spend a lot of time watching the extras on DVD that often include a good mix of video and film, watch how each device reacts to the changes between them. The iScan is likely better for such material. If you spend your time watching only the films, I think you have a hard time determining the difference unless you happened to be watching a very poorly authored DVD and found your 6200 "fooled" quite often.
 

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Another advantage of the iscan is that you can greatly improve the red push problem on the Mits ___07 sets for your composite and s-video sources using a single attenuator out of the iscan. I had a custom VGA/3 RCA breakout cable made by AVCable which has a -3 db attenuator built into the VGA connector. Colors are fantastic on DVD and greatly improved on CATV and VHS/SVHS. I think I paid around $75 for a 2 meter cable. The website is www.avcable.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Red Push is not an issue with me, as I have had the global red push fix.


I will be performing some more comparisons tonight. If anyone has any specific LD or DVD scenes, let me know.
 

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If you have any video based source which has good resolution such as DSS, you could use those. Sporting events are good to use. The Iscan has the capability to blend 2 fields together on any part of the image that seems to be in motion and produce a motion blur similar to a slow exposure (1/30 sec) picture.


As for LD/DVD's any of those TV specials which were recorded in NTSC 30fps format would do.
 

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I use just the Iscan v1 with a Hitachi 36sdx01. I mainly watch the output of a DTV/Tivo and watch a lot of sports. The Iscan makes a big difference in sports. It does a much better job of dealing with motion than my internal line doubler because it looks at more frames.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Gruson


My TV has been ISF calibrated too.

-JW
Does your TV look much better after ISF calibrating? Is it worth spending $250? I calibrated my Mits 46' HDTV myself with Avia and it looks good. Thanks.
 
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