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Alright im asking all these because i just purchases a 24" panasonic tau not hdtv but its an awesome tv. Im not eagerly awaiting xbox to take advantage of it so ive got some questions for my home set up. thanks in advance. here we go...


1)If i understand correctly, comb filters in the tv take the composite signal and seperate it into luminance, chrominance, etc... Now S-video and component bypass the comb filter because its already seperated and thats why it looks better. So with regular A/V would the amount of seperation and in the end the looks of the game depend on your comb filter? if u have a 3D digital filter wouldnt get you kinda close to S-Video appearance?


2) Would there be a noticable difference to me between S-Video and component input? I got s-video because its only 10 dollars but i could always get component. anyone have comparison shots or somethin?


3) how much of a difference is there between A/V and S-video? im hoping its great because ive never used s video before so im hoping itll be a good increase. Also when ur plugging s video in do u put in the yellow visual A/V cord to or just the S video pin?


4) i dont know if anyone would know this but how many lines of resolutions would u say my tv has? remember brand new tau series.


Alright thank you guys very much in advance. thisll be a big help
 

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Just relax. Have patience. Use the forum search page. Search the Web. Questions similar to yours are asked frequently.


S-video just means that the chroma and luminance signals are available separately. It doesn't say anything about how the signals came to be like that. Laserdisc, Over-The-Air NTSC video and analog CATV cable video are all composite. They'll look best if you use a high quality tuner with a 3D comb filter. For example, I've found that JVC's HR-S7600U S-VHS VCR has a better tuner and color separator than are in my CATV STB. When I use it just as a tuner, the s-video output of the VCR produces an image with darker blacks, better contrast and less noise than the s-video output of the STB.


In contrast, the digital video coming off a DVD is component. The colors have to be combined to produce s-video, and then combined again with the luminance signal to produce standard composite video. The component output should produce the best image, at least partially because it's been mucked about with the least.


Component video can have significantly better colors than s-video. One demonstration of this is the Snell-and-Wilcox Zone Plate chapter on the "Video Essentials" DVD. There's a region at the bottom of the image that's muddy brown when viewed using s-video, but blue and green when using component. Subtlties like this can often go unnoticed when watching a movie, though.


Whether the composite video input of your TV produces a better image than the s-video input depends on the quality of the color filter in your TV, the type of video source material you're watching and the quality of its associated circuitry.


I can't comment on the resolution of your TV. I know nothing about it. One source of information would be to plug its model number plus the word "resolution" into Google and peruse the resulting pages.


I hope this helps a little.
 
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