AVS Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay first off, lets just say I get the Onkyo 790 {because it looks like I probably will} then lets say I upgrade the sub to the HSU VTU 3. Now I'm assuming that the reciever would not try to send the surround speakers anything lower than 100Hz or so, huh ? Okay, so now I have this substantially powerful sub, with a variable crossover. Oh sure, I could cross it at 100Hz, to be sure I don't leave any gaps in my sound...... but the problem is, 100Hz bass can be so loud, and can so easily drowned out the rest of a sound system. "OR" I could cross over the sub at 40Hz, and gets lots of rumble / bass in the stomach feeling, without drowning out the mids and highs too much, but then, I end up with a gap from the 100Hz of my surround speakers, to the 40Hz of my sub ???


This all leads me to another thought (I'm hoping this isn't such a big deal for a sub} but are their any subs (maybe say the HSU VTU 3 ?} Which have straight up, built in EQ's ? In other words, so I could still cross the sub over at say 100Hz, or even 150Hz..... but really turn the output down, in the upper end. Then start really pumping it up at 40Hz, and even more so at 30Hz..... {maybe even a spike at 25Hz ? ;-}


What's the word about this ?


Thank you,

Fish


PS, Earlier I had another thought, along these same lines; Does anybody ever use two completely different subs, for two different purposes, in the same system ? I mean, remember, the Onkyo 790 comes with a powered sub. What if I cross it nice and high, like 150Hz (so no gaps in my sound) but don't push it too hard at all {so it's just skating along.... heck it's not even trying to clip}. Then "add" the HSU VTU 3, cross it over at 35Hz, and push the heck out of it ? Would this work ?

I guess what I'm really thinking about, is the poor man's path to something like this > http://www.velodyne.com/velodyne/pro...3&sid=746x396p
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,633 Posts
You are over-thinking your whole setup. Take the HTIB as is, you would cross the sub/speakers at 80. If you calibrated the speakers (all set to small) with test tones at 75db and positioned the sub where it gives the flattest response curve, it isn't going to over power your speakers. If you add a VTF-3 as the primary sub and maybe use the Onkyo sub for mid-bass duty (not recommending this as the HSU will perform the low and mid bass function better than the Onkyo sub), but you would still cross at 80, run the sub out to the HSU, set the HSU Xover at let's say 40, then connect the Onkyo subs input to the HSUs line out. Now your satellites will get everything above 80Hz, the Onkyo sub will get 40 to 80, and the VTF-3 will do the 40 and below. Again, I would just take the Onkyo sub out of this setup and let the HSU do the 80 and below.


You aren't going to find any sub with multiple PEQ bands in the price range of the VTF-3. You can look at PEQs like the Velo SMS-1, Behringer Feedback Destroyer (BFD), or AV123's R-Des, or even something from Rane in a graphic Eq.


But before you drive yourself crazy, just take it one step at a time. You may save yourself a lot of money and headaches. Get your HTIB, then add a quality sub, then add PEQ if needed.


BTW, HSU also markets a 12" sub called the MBM (mid-bass module) just for the 40Hz and above range.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,103 Posts
I agree. There will be no over-powering of the sound as long as it's properly calibrated and there aren't any huge peaks in the bass response. Peaks can sometimes be remedied with more placement experimentation and sweep tones (Avia), but sometimes an EQ is necessary to get the best results. Bass traps also do wonders for the sound, and enough will help tame response, but they aren't as direct as using an eq to cut levels.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Ransac, you said > You are over-thinking your whole setup

Anyway, it's nice to know I could do this if I had to > If you add a VTF-3 as the primary sub and maybe use the Onkyo sub for mid-bass duty (not recommending this as the HSU will perform the low and mid bass function better than the Onkyo sub), but you would still cross at 80, run the sub out to the HSU, set the HSU Xover at let's say 40, then connect the Onkyo subs input to the HSUs line out. Now your satellites will get everything above 80Hz, the Onkyo sub will get 40 to 80, and the VTF-3 will do the 40 and below.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,633 Posts
What I am really suggesting is that you build your system incrementally. Get your HTIB, set it up and give it a listen. Maybe it will surprise you. I was surprised to see this one is spec'ed out at 110WPC for a $399 HTIB. It looks like a very nice system, but at that price, you can't expect much from the speakers/sub. Hook it up, dial it in, and see how it performs. If you are lacking in low and mid bass, add the HSU (or some other higher quality sub), dial it in with out the HTIB sub. If you are still lacking for mid bass, I don't believe you will be, add the HTIB sub back into the mix.


Every room has its own acoustic problems. You may have untamable peaks or bass sucking nulls. If you have any problems and you can't fix them with sub placement, then look to add a PEQ component. But don't buy a lot of gear in anticipation of needing it. See how things sound and purchase as needed.


Actual Xover settings will be discovered during set up. It is typical to cross the sub at 80, but that is not always satisfactory. Room response, speaker FR, and listening preferences force adjustments. 80Hz is just a good starting point.


Right not it is all a crap-shoot as to what kind of room response you will get. So take it one step at a time.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,633 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fish Chris /forum/post/0


This sounds like great advice.


Slow down Fish Chris !


This place is great.... Free therapy :)


Peace,

Fish

Not free. You'll get my bill tomorrow.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top