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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first post, so hello everyone.


Now that I've decided to jump on the HDTV bandwagon, I hope to become a regular around here. Actually, decided is the wrong word, since my 8 year old Sony 61" bigscreen finally became too expense to repair again, but that's another story.


I just want to say that I've been exploring the forums and taking advantage of the search engine, and have gained a lot of great info, especially when it comes to the subject of screen burn, which has burned me in the past, no pun intended.


I've soaked up a great deal of valuable info, and I want to thank those people who have really made it easier for newbies like me to do their homework.


My decision on what type of TV is easier than most, because I've had a 61" several years, and I can't bring myself to watch a smaller set. Unfortunately, my budget is around 2500, and the only way I can afford a 60" TV for that price is to give up any dreams of buying either a plasma, LCD, or DLP unit, even though I really wanted a DLP set, because of their immunity to screen burn.


Even though much of the info I gained here is out of my price range, I did learn a few valuable things.


To always make sure the native resolution is 720p or 1080i


To turn the brightness and contrast down.


To always try and watch regular programming in stretch mode.


That if I absolutely have to watch any program with bars, that I should follow that up with watching something in stretch mode.


To avoid fixed images (such as MS NBC) if at all possible, and at the very least, change channels during commercials to break up the signal.


To consider turning contrast to zero for unimportant programming.


To alternate stretch and full screen viewing.


To allow for the possibility for a Toshiba set to have a line down the middle, and not be surprised if I detect one.


Hopefully, I caught all the important stuff.


Now for the question.


I've narrowed my choice down to two sets.


Toshiba 65H84

Mitsubishi WS-65315


Both are sold at BB, where I plan to make my purchase, and I went and looked at both sets yesterday, which I found a very interesting experience.


Luckily for me, both sets were side by side, and it didn't take long to see a difference between the two, with no noticeable winner. From my perspective, it looked like the Mitsubishi was the clear winner, in terms of picture clarity (crispness), but that the Toshiba had vastly richer color.


There is, of course, the possibility that both sets had their settings messed up, and there was no remote (or salesperson) anywhere near.


Since both sets have a native 1080i resolution (at least that's what the BB website says), and their price are within 100 dollars of each other, I can't decide which to get.


Maybe the Toshiba has better colors because it has a HDMI input, but would BB even be using that.


And as silly as this sounds, a real deal maker for me, would be if one set had wheels and the other did not, as I have a bare floor and like to move my set occasionally, so I can clean behind it.


Well that about covers my post. I didn't expect to say this much. Sorry for being so long winded.


If anyone wants to chime in with an opinion, please do so. That's why I made the post.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Targo
My decision on what type of TV is easier than most, because I've had a 61" several years, and I can't bring myself to watch a smaller set.
> I’m guessing that your old set had an aspect ratio of 4:3? Since all the new TVs are 16:9, you’ll never find a set that will produce a 4:3 image even close to the size your old set for around $2500. The good side is that you only need a ~50†screen to have the same image size as your old set for widescreen DVDs, etc.

http://www.cavecreations.com/tv2.cgi has a comparison calculator that’s very useful.


As for your burn-in concerns, if you buy a Avia or DVE calibration DVD and set your contrast and brightness levels correctly, you shouldn’t have to worry about burn-in with CRT TVs.
 

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Targo, maybe you could buy something very cheap to "tide you over" til you can save more for a DLP or RP-LCD?....


I believe you always have to worry about burn-in, Avia/DVE or not. People with ISF-calibrated sets have gotten burn-in. My set was Video Essentials calibrated and it still got burnin. It's not just a function of running in torch mode, there is a cumulative effect of static images.


Personally, I hate stretch/zoom modes, and can't stand to have to restrict my viewing of channels with static images.


I got a RP-LCD (50 inch for about 2.5 kilobux) and I love the brightness, the sharpness, the rich colors (not an either/or here), the zillions of inputs ....


That's my best advice ... think about a smaller set that's within your price range that's DLP or RP-LCD, or continue saving until you can get the bigger size of one of these sets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cumulative effect? So flipping channels during a commercial break won't help? I sent my old set to the repair shop many years ago, and it came back with screen burn, but that's another story.


I can't believe that screen burn is that easy to acquire, even if you take reasonable precautions. Otherwise the number of people who had the problem would create such a consumer uproar that the mainstream media would have picked up on it.
 

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I agree with Acura, especially if you watch a lot of DVD's or HD programming. Your old set, I'm sure, wasn't HD or 16:9. On a 16:9 set, with a widescreen source, the viewing area of a 50" should be fine. And then there are some LCD's that are within or close to your budget, and some DLP's a little more of a stretch. You also won't have to worry about burn-in.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Targo
Cumulative effect? So flipping channels during a commercial break won't help? I sent my old set to the repair shop many years ago, and it came back with screen burn, but that's another story.


I can't believe that screen burn is that easy to acquire, even if you take reasonable precautions. Otherwise the number of people who had the problem would create such a consumer uproar that the mainstream media would have picked up on it.
Believe what you like. It happens to a lot of people who, like me, just live with it, then never buy a RP-CRT again. See, most people don't start class action lawsuits or cause uproars. They just learn from their mistakes. And some don't.


Of course changing channels helps. But the cumulative effect still happens.


Is it a lot of fun to have to be so friggin' INTERACTIVE with your set? Personally, I like to put a channel on and watch the program in its OAR.


Each to his own, however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wouldn't call screen burn a mistake, as it seems to happen by simply using the device as it was intended. Plus, there's no warning in owner's manual.


I would love to have a DLP, but they are a bit out of my range.


I'll check the prices again.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Targo
I wouldn't call screen burn a mistake, as it seems to happen by simply using the device as it was intended. Plus, there's no warning in owner's manual.


I would love to have a DLP, but they are a bit out of my range.


I'll check the prices again.
> There should be a warning in the manual about static screen content or videogames...


Besides, owner's manuals are not always correct. The JVC D-ILA I bought has a specific warning about burn-in with their set, but burn-in for a LCOS isn't possible.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Targo
I wouldn't call screen burn a mistake, as it seems to happen by simply using the device as it was intended. Plus, there's no warning in owner's manual.


I would love to have a DLP, but they are a bit out of my range.


I'll check the prices again.
I didn't mean acquiring burn-in was a mistake, but buying a RP-CRT. At least for me (and a lot of other people).
 

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Targo, for $2500 you should be able to pick up 50" LCD from Sony (Grand Wega III models are on closeout at a lot of stores, but won't last long.) or Panasonic. While it's true that the size will be a bit smaller on 4x3 material the tradeoff may be worth avoiding the viewing gymnastics you mention. I mean can you be sure everyone in your family is going to follow protocol when watching if you are not around? As for the smaller size, maybe you can just move the sofa closer...
 
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