AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm using a modified RS DBT and want to take it outside. I plan to hang it from the deck's bottom rail. I would like to ground it even though I personally feel that the risk is minimal.


The way I plan to do it is this way: The modified DBT will hang from the deck. I'll connect the RG-6 from this antenna to a grounding block. From here, the ground wire will connect to the A/C unit's ground. I'll run about 35 feet of RG-6 from the grounding block through a hole in the wall to my dish 6000.


I'll make a drip loop before it enters the house. I have read that the ground block should be just before the cable enters the house. Why? What's wrong with my plan??


Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,972 Posts
Skin effect is your answer.


Static electricity and RF tend to travel over the surface of objects. If you leave a section of coax exposed beyond the house shell up to the ground block and then a long path to real earth ground it will pick up any static electricity between the house and real ground. Don't know about your AC ground but the best way is to put the ground block next to the house entry point and run its own solid (not braided) wire to its own ground rod driven into the ground about 10 ft.

Having said that, consider it theoretical as with static electricity, any direct hit, not likely, will fry everything anyway. What you want to be most concerned about are the small buildups of static electricity that could silently kill your first RF amp that you connect your coax to. This could be your receiver or your in house antenna amplifier, if you have one. Primarily, that's what you are trying to protect with the grounding block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. So, the grounding is an insurance so to speak. I propose to have an in house amp between the coax in and the reciever. How would I know if it is fried? Without the amp, I get signals at 75% and with it at 85%. If the amp is fried, will I lose the signal completely or it will just degrade to 75%.??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,972 Posts
That's a tough question. It depends on the nature of the amp. If the amp shorts out and does not short the signal to ground than it may simply conduct but most likely when it takes a silent hit it, in all probability will simply stop working and you will get no signal at all.


Just remember that it's not the cataclysmic direct hit you should be worrying about, it's the frequent buildup of static electricity that will zap your expensive home theater equipment that will in all probability, nail you.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top