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Discussion Starter #21
Gah, this thread is too depressing to contemplate: I had no idea even BD-R as backup storage was considered passe now. The mass herd has moved on to cloud storage, or no storage at all, while I suppose the corporate world has moved to Azure or Amazon or some such. I fear the (probably fast approaching) day when external HDDs and USB sticks disappear: I vastly prefer my files be in my physical possession, thanks.

Perhaps the imminent explosion, implosion and consolidation of streaming services might nudge people back to the thought that, hey, perhaps its not such a bad idea to actually own some physically-stored media files. Disney recently hammered a stake thru the heart of NetFlix core library, a half dozen other big players are poised to enter the fray and trigger a street fight, broadcast networks are getting greedy with distribution fees to the point of cutting their own throats, the cloud is getting hacked more frequently than trees in the rainforest. Lots of factors are conspiring to end the relatively brief period when it seemed the naively utopian Star Trek Holodeck had come true (rely on a one or two beneficent streaming sources for all media consumption, no need to personally own anything, the entire world of music, TV and film will be at my fingertips forever with no petty squabbling among studios or tech giants to interrupt access or bill me by the number of dialog lines).

Fun times ahead. The current generation of entitled kids born with an iPhone in one hand and cheap-as-chips NetFlix subscription in the other will be gobsmacked when old-school business realities return with a vengeance to snatch their assumptions away.
All we need is a hundred year Carrington Event to burn away nearly a century of archived media in the big houses. Although considering the recent Universal archives fire.. we may not have to wait that long.

It seems everyday I go online and try to find something that was left alone for 'years' when some newbie intern decides to 'Spring Clean' and save the company tons of money in storage fees to boost their career. After all, anyone that would be interested in that old stuff died years ago.. and ya'know.. its not 'New'.

There is a small number of middle aged slackers who are hording physical media in case of a natural or legal apocalypse that makes it all but unobtainable.. but pretty soon we may have to go back to millenium disc and petroglyphs.

Things tend to go in cycles.. and if there is one thing we humans are likely to do.. its repeat very bad ideas.. just look at what happened to the library at Alexandria.

I think we're a bit over due.
 

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I had no idea even BD-R as backup storage was considered passe now.
I'm sure a lot of people consider any optical storage as passe now, compared with using a HDD. While I have a disk farm for ripped content on my media server that can be streamed through the house, I personally prefer using BD-R for permanent storage of that content. I have BD-R I burned 8yr ago that are still perfect and could be ripped back to the server any time. The same goes for DVD-R I have that were burned 12-13yr ago.

I wouldn't trust an HDD to statically preserve the content over that period of time.

HDD storage has gotten very cheap, but so has BD-R. I bought a portable 5TB external HDD for $114 -- used for transportable content. 5TB is the equivalent of 200 BD-R which would cost me $92. So using BD-R for long term permanent storage suits me just fine.
 

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HDD storage has gotten very cheap, but so has BD-R. I bought a portable 5TB external HDD for $114 -- used for transportable content. 5TB is the equivalent of 200 BD-R which would cost me $92. So using BD-R for long term permanent storage suits me just fine.
Or if I did my math correct, $250 using -R DVDs(at $20/100 which is getting hard to find nowadays) :(
 

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Yes, BD-R has been a lot cheaper than DVD-R (on a $/GB basis) for quite some time now.
 

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Hey, I have a few questions about Verbatim if you guys don't mind me asking them here as they're somewhat relevant. I'm almost through my last TY-G02 spool I have from almost 10 years ago. At that time, I remember TY or Verbs were the gotos and now I see they'll both be made by CMC. My main need is archival life as I assume it's probably the case with most users.

First, is there any difference in quality between the regular branded Verbs than the inkjet or thermal printable ones? I see they all use the AZO dye.

Are there any better DVD-Rs available at this time, excluding gold discs, that I should consider?

Finally, I'm not positive that my remaining TY-G02s were bought before the CMC acquisition. Might have been a year or two afterwards. If that's the case, are these current Verbs an upgrade in quality? Thanks
 

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As you seem to burn very little and might be interested in the real TY-02's old stock(at least I'm pretty sure they are pre-CMC) you might want to look into these Maxell + series DVDs. At the current ~$18/50 or $36 for 100 they are more expensive than the ~$25/100 the AZO CMC Verbs currently go for but again considering how little you burn and archival quality seems to be important to you, the extra $11 for 100 DVDs just might be worth it?
I purchased several of these when Newegg had them for the unbelievable price of $8/50(wish I had purchased more but they were limit 6 and at the time I didn't truly realize what a steal they were). A current Google search yields a couple of sellers advertising them for ~$18/50. I've included 2 links but haven't delt with either company, Newegg seems to be out of stock on these discs.
https://www.outletpc.com/ng2820.html?cmp_id=1374919087&adg_id=54255459585&kwd=&device=c&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpvGqxtv44wIVQtbACh2EQgawEAQYBCABEgLYGPD_BwE
https://computercity.com/products/maxell-dvdrssplus?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=Google Shopping&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpvGqxtv44wIVQtbACh2EQgawEAQYBSABEgLvgvD_BwE
All prices I quoted include shipping and no tax the best I can tell.
 

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I still have some big Verbatim floppy disks, I win the interwebs!
8" floppies? If so you are probably correct, if 5 1/4".....well I've probably got a dozen or so of those around, including an old PC that could read them(that hasn't been fired up since well before Y2K) :p
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
JJeff the links you pointed to are the same suppliers that formerly sold (thru) the Newegg store.

I back tracked them when ordering, at the time shipping was a part of the deal so that brought the cost down even more.

Its probable that the demand for these DVD-R media has dropped (so much) that it wasn't worth the resellers time to continue to resell through Newegg, since Newegg would take a cut of the profits(?) that they would make. That or Newegg was emptying its warehouse of any remaining stock pre-supplied by the suppliers to make room for other things.

I consider it a bad sign that the reach of the remaining suppliers has stepped back even further. That the price is a little higher does speak that they are selling, but will soon exhaust their remaining supply. That is its not worth reselling through NewEgg, but they can get a little higher price from collectors and the supply will soon be gone completely. The rarity drives up the price a little, especially if they read AVSForums.

The depression that may soon set in, that almost no media will work consistently in older DVD recorders.. and people may soon turn away from them.. leaves me sad. They are incredible machines for converting pre-digital video to digital without a PC.

Its a bit of retcon to my memory, but when I started helping IsoBuster read the hard drives from many different makes and models of DVD recorder with hard drives.. this was on the tip of my imagination.

Replacing the DVD burner with a newer model DVD burner would not be of any use, if the media eventually all went away.. even if it was Blu-Ray. It may last a little longer on the market.. but the trajectory of digital media is that its not being stored on analog media any more. And its a stretch but DVD-R media is a kind of analog media, it survives dropouts to a degree and degrades in a non-uniform manner.

The market for good or bad is still supporting digital media, and focusing on archival grade digital media.. even if that is in digital data center accessible in the cloud. One day.. we may have similar localized digital storage in our homes or on our person.. like home/personal DNA printers that encodes the media in small crystals using a microscope like 3D printer.. that would have far more density and more control over the "digital" or quantum level characteristics than available with analog "film". Its more like laying down brick and mortar than planting a field to store data.

And when you think about it Castles have lasted longer over time, than a field planted hundreds of years ago.

So the trick for now is to get the analog media over the bridge to the digital realm.. and then worry about the storage media. You could burn it to Blu-Ray.. its still available, or you could make multiple copies to hard drives that Backblaze recommends as the most reliable for that year.. and duplicating them with standalone drive duplicators from year to year. I mean that's a different problem after the video is digitized...

The convenience of using a DVD recorder to make the transition, at its top speed, without editing and authoring a DVD disc on the machine is the true benefit for now. All of the Pioneer DVD recorders are now supported, All of the Toshibas, and as far as I have been able to tell all of the Panasonics.. so the problem finding one single DVD recorder with a hard drive has been vastly reduced.

Where I've failed is mostly in the PAL realm.. I've pleaded and begged for some recorders from the UK and Europe and got a very few models for testing and there are (some) PAL DVD recorders we know you can remove the hard drive from and copy the recordings off in their full unmodified original resolution and format. We just added Philips HDVR3500 but that's a rare event.. its just too hard to get them and too few people seem interested over there these days. One fellow had a SONY that worked.. I wish we had more to test with.. but shipping.. I guess thats the reason.. it costs so much.

I do think its interesting to get some old media and "exercise" the machine as it was originally designed, its great for a demo, and to understand how these worked.. but I wonder how much longer you'll even be able to playback optical discs.. especially if a static crystal recorder and player suddenly become available?

Its not that far fetched.. the stereo lithographic 3D printers that use UV light and a cell phone display to "print" high resolution data in microscopic parts is running only 200 us dollars today. You could almost print a DVD disc sideways with that technology complete with video data on it and play it back in a DVD recorder today.

BTW: I can't recommend IsoBuster enough, the software author has done amazing things with a product that is very flexible. He's the real genius behind figuring out how to read HDD from the recorders without understanding the code that runs on them.
 

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BTW: I can't recommend IsoBuster enough, the software author has done amazing things with a product that is very flexible. He's the real genius behind figuring out how to read HDD from the recorders without understanding the code that runs on them.
Funny you should mention IsoBuster. I had a DVD that had was basically full, it had a couple of titles recorded by one of my Panasonic DVD recorders. I went to finalize the disc and my recorder went through a self-check and after several automatic restarts of my DVDR(a EH-50 FWIW) it now reports the DVD is blank :( This happens on very rare occasions on Panasonics, sometimes after the self check the disc is OK and you can still record on it or finalize it the second time, other times(the most common scenerio) you can still see and play the titles but when you try and finalize it or record more to it, it says the DVD is non-recordable. In this case the DVD can be played in any Panasonic DVDR but basically no DVD players(or PCs) which require a DVD to be finalized before playing. Anyway with this most recent disc when I try and record to it it says something to the effect the disc is non-recordable and shows the DVD is blank. I tried it on several of my Panasonics but same thing. In desperation I tried a couple programs on my PC, DVD Shrink(which reports the DVD as being blank), VLC says disc is blank and an old copy of IsoBuster(v3.3 FWIW) which also shows the DVD as being blank :(
My question to you, and something that might push me purchase the newest version of IsoBuster is, do you think the newest version would read this basically full DVD that nothing else seems to be able to read?

AFA the Maxell DVDs I linked, it's my guess they are old stock, I don't think Maxell even makes DVDs anymore do they? and for sure not quality TY02 DVDs, once there gone I'm pretty sure we'll never see something like them anymore.
Yes the Newegg $8 price included shipping but so does the $18 current price(at least it says it is).
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
JJeff, I'd like to say IsoBuster can cure the common cold.. but that might be a stretch (.. but only slightly :) )

Its very possible it might work. It mostly depends on DVD-R or DVD+R, and then its a matter of the odds whether it for sure will or will not work.

DVD-R/RW basically performs all the "fixups" as its recorded, finalizing only updates the index or VTOC from my undertanding.. so in that case while the titles might be missing, the whole program titles might still be available.. they just have to be fetched from the disc "blindly". IsoBuster is a bit "vague" in what it absolutely "demands" of a disc.. its a pauper when it comes to demanding a particular format or requirements.. it takes whatever it can find and makes do.

DVD+R/RW is a bit "messy" in that it lets programs remain "as recorded" until being finalized and "moved all over the disc so they can be played back by a low power (computational power) and more demanding player.. if it is not powerful enough, the player just gives up and says.. nope.. ain't gonna try. Isobuster just says.. oh well.. and tries anyway.. never giving up. Even if IsoBuster finds nothing.. it will let you skim the sectors one by one and browse them in binary or hex. IsoBuster is not an editor.. but more a discovery and recovery tool.

The big changes to IsoBuster in the last five months to version 4.4 are that it has vastly improved its ability to recognize particular "flavors" of proprietary (interpretations?) of the VR and VRO specification.. and in some cases it throws every preconception literally (out the window) and manually detects weird and damaged VRO formats.. its a bit schizophrenic and that is definitely (on purpose).. it took quite a bit of discussion to convenience the expert and precise author of IsoBuster.. to let go being one hundred percent accurate in all cases .. he's very use to salvaging corrupt data.. but he is a perfectionist.. really he's darn good at what he does.

The licensing of IsoBuster lets you install the IsoBuster version 4.4 in a demo mode (without a license) to read and scan hard disks, raw disk image files and anything that looks like a bunch of sectors and tries its best to fit a design to it that works. and it has many switches from the command line and the gui to override and force it to look at the design through a different kaleidoscope of possible formats.. when you lock on to the correct one it simply lets you right click and export the file to your PC hard disk.

This lets you "try before you buy" a Professional license to the program which enables all features for export.

The license is not incremental, you get everything for one price, every possible recorder format is enabled. And it gets you support from the author.. if you can't figure it out with the tool in its default mode.. you can contact him and provide a disk image made using IsoBuster that he can examine and get back to you.. once he has found the solution he generally adds it as a new special (supported) case to the next version of IsoBuster and it improves. He's very big on making the tool (automatic) as much as possible so the learning curve is very steep.. in that you really need to learn very little to use the most features.. you simply start the program and it tries to guess the disc your trying to recover files from.. or you have to guide it by selecting one from the drop down. Its really astonishingly simple to use and keeps getting better.

And since you already have a copy of IsoBuster, you don't have to buy it completely again.. there is an upgrade path. There is almost no risk to you trying it before you upgrade and then making the decision based on the results.

For other people, even if they were ever thinking about buying a license but putting it off.

I've done that before and independently developed software went away, or became unavailable after it was bought out by another company and that feature was removed.. or the software was simply no longer offered for sale. This has happened so often to me.. I'm very cautious and buy a license to things even if I'm not sure I will be using them in the future.

With the low cost of the license, and having over 50+ DVD Recorders supported.. its a must have for me at full price. But if your upgrading.. even more so in my opinion.

Its practically future proof, in that if you have a DVD recorder today that it works with.. and that fails.. but you can find a different model or one from another supported brand.. your back in business. So even though DVD recorders are becoming rare.. almost any brand/model will do.. as long as its listed as "tested" and more are still being added to that list.

MAXELL: from what I read at the time I bought them from NewEgg. History was they are Ty discs from the original Ty maker. "The ones" sought for very high dollar today.

A few people have tried them in recent years and got 100 out of 100 to burn on very old Pioneer DVD recorders with zero coasters.

They are a secret stash that happened I think because MAXELL exited the DVD market so quickly compared to all the other brand names. They barely got into relabeling Ty's before they got out. The result was a surplus of good quality discs that did not sell for a long time, because they held their value in the warehouse.. because the owners of the warehouse knew the real story.

Unlike the later JVC and CMC versions of the Ty discs.. these "missed" those transition periods.. so from what I've read.. "they are the real deal".

With the withdrawl from NewEgg.. and Amazon.. I can only imagine that these very few vendors don't have a lot of stock left and they will soon be gone. Probably only collectors and people who have stumbled across them at this late date will get a fleeting chance at buying a few before they are all gone.

MAXELL Media Review:

Since I bought some of the originals from NewEgg. Thought I'd describe the media.

First this is for the DVD-RSS media type.. the ones we are talking about, not some other variant.

The DVD-R is the type the "SS" stands for "Single Sided" or "Silver Sided" which in this context means the media is recordable only on "one side" and the label side is "silver reflective" but has no actual label surface. Its simply the raw polycarbonate and the metallic layer below gives it a slightly green hue".

The discs come with a slight oily film on their surface, which I assume is a finishing solution or sealant that has protected them for so long.

Generally its recommended that you do "wash" or remove this oily film before use. It was only used on premium discs of the era.. so cheap consumer versions did not have the film and people thought that a "bonus" you could immediately toss them in a recorder with no prep work.. but this was "premium" media for "professionals".. so a little more care and effort was expected .. for better results.

If you run the tip of your finger across the label side you can see the oily droplets cling and release and rearrange on its surface.. it doesn't really rub off.. so much as gently swirl around.. its not really all that messy. Not like you would think.. and you might even not notice it in a darkened room.

Due to this non-ink jet absorption or hard thermal printer surface.. these discs are not really designed for an inkjet or thermal disc printer.

These are quite rare, in that they are what I would call "archival grade" discs.. in that storing them in a jewel case without a label on the disc surface might be more appropriate.

A sticky label.. is a horrible idea as that tends to warp and unbalance the disc and can damage the polycarbonate depending on the ammonia or other chemicals in the glues binder.

A hub label isn't much better for the same potential to damage the seal on the disc from the center outwards.

I suppose some kinds of sharpie, or limited ink or thermal jet printer might work.. since that would limit the surface coverage. But your mileage may vary. The various chemicals are not likely to bind very tightly to the polycarbonate and would tend to rub off.

The recording side of the media is a deep deep "royal purple" color with a very uniform and consistent layer. I've only seen something close to this with AZO discs and compared to those these make the AZO look "pale".

I am not certain of the chemical make up of the discs.. but they certainly appear to be of very high grade.

These are 8X discs.. and even though they are rated for 8X they have been reported to burn successfully in 4X DVD recorders.

The discs do seem to have the atypical "saucer bow" from edge to center, so they don't lay flat on each other. The center spoke of the hat box rises up and they are packed with a styrofoam ring to tamp down vibration of the stack when the lid is placed on the stack and twisted to lock it down.

In subtle ways they seem to be a notch above what you would expect from cheaper media. I almost hate to think of burning one since they are so uncommon. The labeling from Maxell is completely in English and looks all North American.. but I think these must have been made in Japan.

A final comment about the "Specifications" on the sellers websites.

I don't think they are very accurate for this media. Most of it looks like "recycled" blurbs from other DVD-R media. These have (no) surface label, nothing that says Maxell or HP ect.. no lines or brand name logos.. plain generic clear plastic polycarbonate.

They are advertised as "print from center to edge" ready for "printers" which might be true if you have the special inks that professional disc printers use. But these are very smooth and "slick" surfaced. They have nothing for after market or cheap consumer printers to "grab on to".. most of what you might use to label these discs simply won't bind and will slip or rub off.

If you think you can stick these in an Epson or Canon printer and get a good result.. think again.. I think that is highly unlikely.

Until I learn otherwise.. I'd think a sharpie and a steady hand with minimal labeling would be your best bet.
 

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As you seem to burn very little and might be interested in the real TY-02's old stock(at least I'm pretty sure they are pre-CMC) you might want to look into these Maxell + series DVDs. At the current ~$18/50 or $36 for 100 they are more expensive than the ~$25/100 the AZO CMC Verbs currently go for but again considering how little you burn and archival quality seems to be important to you, the extra $11 for 100 DVDs just might be worth it?
I purchased several of these when Newegg had them for the unbelievable price of $8/50(wish I had purchased more but they were limit 6 and at the time I didn't truly realize what a steal they were). A current Google search yields a couple of sellers advertising them for ~$18/50. I've included 2 links but haven't delt with either company, Newegg seems to be out of stock on these discs.
https://www.outletpc.com/ng2820.html?cmp_id=1374919087&adg_id=54255459585&kwd=&device=c&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpvGqxtv44wIVQtbACh2EQgawEAQYBCABEgLYGPD_BwE
https://computercity.com/products/maxell-dvdrssplus?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=Google Shopping&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpvGqxtv44wIVQtbACh2EQgawEAQYBSABEgLvgvD_BwE
All prices I quoted include shipping and no tax the best I can tell.
Thanks jjeff, I did check the media deals thread earlier and I admit that I had skimmed past the Maxell posts. I had recalled them getting out even before TY so I discounted them offering anything of higher quality. I appreciate the info,the review from jwillis and it's surprising that there's still a small stock of these, after ten years.

It looks like I just missed a sale too but I'll buy a spindle now and hope to catch the next one. Do those sales from those vendors on Newegg last 24 hours before they pull them or shorter?
 

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It looks like I just missed a sale too but I'll buy a spindle now and hope to catch the next one. Do those sales from those vendors on Newegg last 24 hours before they pull them or shorter?
Honestly, I'd be surprised to ever see such a sale again, but I could be wrong :)
I think the two times they did this before were not too far apart and after the first person posted here, it wasn't too long after they were out(like a day or two).
I know if I ever see it again I'll order the max amount again(I believe it was 5 or 6 spindles) but I'd be shocked if it did return.
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
I'm with Jjeff on this.. probably won't see a sale like that again.

Its only a guess on my part, but I think the last sellers are winding down their supply. NewEgg seemed to be running a blowout sale at the time, and even then they placed a limit on how many each buyer could obtain.. (the Free shipping was NewEgg free shipping direct from their warehouse.. to close out stock?) a bit of generosity on their part? or to collect email addresses for after sale marketing of other products. The listings at NewEgg now state they are through the sellers Jjeff mentioned.. so probably no free shipping in the future.

As I recall this was around July 4th of last year and nothing since.

I bought some Verbatim Data Life Plus before the sale of the Verbatim name and equipment to China Magnetics, their exit of the market statement said it included their Blu-Ray assets too.. so for Verbatim the entire show in optical media is over. (frankly) they are good, but not as good looking as these Maxell discs.

The Maxell comes in a 50 ct milk white plastic hat box sealed with a shrink wrap ring of plastic which has a loose leaf label simply wound up and stuck on the inside of the hat box.

These could have easily been imported from Japan as "unlabeled" media and the insert put into the box and resealed.. or put into the box at the factory to make relabeling the product easier.

I speak of a paper flyer wound up like a sheet of notebook paper around the outside of the stack, no glue, no tape.. "inside" the hat box facing out. When you open the hat box it falls out and its nearly impossible to wind back up and stuff in the box while you close it.

Its a nice glossy print.. but technically a cheap method of rebranding.. Maxell really didn't invest a lot of their dollars in their first attempt at entering the market. It looks nice, its okay.. but to my imagination says.. this was an experiment.. they found a good supplier and put their name on the product. They could easily have gone with a cheaper supplier.. but at the time.. I don't think there were many cheaper brands to source. So luck of the draw.. they probably went with a professional contact in Japan and closed the deal. All this is speculation of course.. decades later.

I'm struggling with the idea of buying more before they are gone, even at twice the price.

The worry wart in me thinks these are the end times and we won't see this quality again.

If.. and that's a big if.. CMC releases new media with the Verbatim name, there is no reason why they would retool using Verbatims equipment. Might as well continue what they're doing and relabel their own brand with the cheaply acquired Verbatim brand in the West.

It would be really nice if they did re-formulate or start targeting a brand specifically for older stand alone recorders.. but activity on this list also shows that ship has sailed as well.

Imgburn read of a blank Maxell DVD-RSS disc
 

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Honestly, I'd be surprised to ever see such a sale again, but I could be wrong :)
I think the two times they did this before were not too far apart and after the first person posted here, it wasn't too long after they were out(like a day or two).
I know if I ever see it again I'll order the max amount again(I believe it was 5 or 6 spindles) but I'd be shocked if it did return.
Yeah, I'm going to use this batch before deciding to pick up more but I'll still monitor Newegg. I did set up a price alert, though it's the first time I've used that there, so I can't speak for it's speed or accuracy. I'd only want a few more spindles anyway.

If that sale did last for 24hrs, I should be able to catch it. If anyone else sees one, please post it in the deals thread and I'll do likewise.
 

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The discs come with a slight oily film on their surface, which I assume is a finishing solution or sealant that has protected them for so long.

Generally its recommended that you do "wash" or remove this oily film before use. It was only used on premium discs of the era.. so cheap consumer versions did not have the film and people thought that a "bonus" you could immediately toss them in a recorder with no prep work.. but this was "premium" media for "professionals".. so a little more care and effort was expected .. for better results.

If you run the tip of your finger across the label side you can see the oily droplets cling and release and rearrange on its surface.. it doesn't really rub off.. so much as gently swirl around.. its not really all that messy. Not like you would think.. and you might even not notice it in a darkened room.
Thanks for your write-ups, jwillis. The comments about the oily solution caught my eye and wanted to ask if you needed to wash each disc. Do you think if I wiped the playside gently with a microfiber clothe, that should suffice?
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I think you do want to wash them to minimize weakening the laser during writing. The recorder might decide to try a higher burning power.. or its laser might already be so weak from age that it doesn't see the media and can't read its type before writing.

However, the oil droplet are quite fine and the laser assembly "triaxilates" from my memory I recall that started with CDROM burners and continued into DVD.. which means the laser is on a servo controlled platform and can jockey about "slightly" to get a clear path around microscopic dust and dirt on a DVD blank.

So while it might go ahead and burn perfectly.. you may pay a price down the line for making the recorder work harder.. or it might fail during a burn.. or when you decide to try finalizing later.

A fiber cloth is better than nothing.. but the sealant or oil is really fine.. I guess the cloth could soak up some of it.. and incrementally make the situation better.. but not perfect.

I've read on this forum that people used to have to clean certain blanks by washing them with a neutral soap solution and pat dry before using certain brands of media. This seems like one of those cases.
 

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I've read on this forum that people used to have to clean certain blanks by washing them with a neutral soap solution and pat dry before using certain brands of media.
That was very common for Panasonic DVD-RAM disks -- in the day. People reported read/write problems and the first word of advice I gave was to wash them with tepid water using liquid dish soap and dry with a soft towel. That almost always did the trick. I have close to 75 RAM's and had to wash every one of them.
 

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That was very common for Panasonic DVD-RAM disks -- in the day. People reported read/write problems and the first word of advice I gave was to wash them with tepid water using liquid dish soap and dry with a soft towel. That almost always did the trick. I have close to 75 RAM's and had to wash every one of them.
So one drop of dish soap with distilled water 1:100 should it then. I use the same to clean my TV screen and then just water to remove the soap. Btw I still have the RAM disc that came with the a Panasonic lol. Was saving it for a rainy day.
 
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