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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today, I discovered one problem with the dark paint (Behr "Slate Ridge") I used to paint my HT room ceiling and walls. The room (about 13 * 23) has four 60 watt fluorescent lights and some spotlighting in the back. When ironing my clothes today - a wasp somehow got in the room. When ever it flew anywhere but directly under the lighting it was near impossible to see. Atfer some patience (about an hour) - I got the bugger. Even with all the lights, the room is still very dark in many spots which makes vacuuming difficult. When the lights are off it passes the Russ Hershcelman HT controlled lighting test.


Seriously though, can't wait till the HT is fully ready - just need to finish the DIY screen. The dark paint does make a difference. When I first got my CRT, I hooked it up to see if it was working. The room at that time was an off white with a white ceiling. Since the dark paint, hooked up the CRT again and it was noticeably better in terms of colors. The colors seemed to jump out more even on the cheapie temporary screen I was using: $10 of white paper from an art store.
 

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What exactly is the "Russ Herschelman HT controlled lighting test"?
 

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I believe that is when you sit down and turn out all the lights in the room (with all your equipment off), and you should not be able to see anything (and I mean anything) even after your eyes adjust to the darkness.


I can do this in my theater, and I have to say it's rather disconcerting not being able to see anything at all.


Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Filmnut,


Mark is correct. I read this in the Special AVS forum where Russ Herschelman was a guest. Here is his quote:

Quote:
Here's my acid test: At high noon on a sunny day, sit in your home theater, turn off all the lights, and look at the screen. With the drapes closed, you should not be able to see your hand waving in front of your face. If you can, it's time to get better black-out drapes. You need 100% attenuation (most "black-outs" are 80-90%), and you may even need to install a channel around the perimeter of the entire window (on both sides of the drape). This dual channel will prevent light from seeping around the edges, destroying your picture quality.
 
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