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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,


I am ready to build a screen frame this weekend (my HCCV is on the way)

I need an 80x45 (92" diag) screen, and I am using 1x3's. I want to miter the ends at 45 degrees and join them with L-braces and wood screws.


Some of these questions might be answered elsewhere, but it is hard to find the answers to specific questions like these, so I do appreciate the help (either a link or just advice).


1) Is this correct: I need two 86" and two 51" pieces of wood?

1b) If I want a support, would a single vertical one in the middle suffice?

1c) Would I mount this support after doing the screen - or does this depend on #4 (mounting fabric)?


2) What type of wood is strong enough to hold the staples without cracking, and won't loosen over time? At the same time, I don't need anything over overkill or too heavy. I also don't need perfect, finished wood because I will be covering it (either with velvet or with another outer frame that has velvet on it).


3) If I do want to go with an inner and outer frame, how exactly do I do this? I have heard of people building the 1x3 frame, stretching the fabric, and then adding a type of trim to the front ... can someone give me details?


4) How can I ensure a tight, wrinkle free, installation of the fabric? I bought the raw material to staple. Option 1 would be to just staple the fabric to the back of the frame (that was my original plan). If I do that how do I make sure it is taut without stretching too much? Pull while stapling? line up and then start stapling? I bought an extra 2" around (86x49) just in case. Option 2 as I understand it is to stretch around the 1x3s (like a canvas), and then stapling.


5) What is the best way to mount this to a wall? Brackets on the top corners put into beams in the wall? I don't know the distance between the beams but I can figure that out, I just need mounting options if you don't mind!


I'm so close I can taste it!!! I should have the screen built just in time for the projector installation!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So many people have built screens, can't anyone please help? At least question #4?
 

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I am fixing to build my own screen as well. I don't have exact answers for you but I did find this link earlier. You may already have this info but it shows how to build the frame and stretch the screen and all. I hope this helps.


h ttp:// members.shaw.ca/danhanson/Theater/screen/screenproject.htm


Sorry I couldn't link it. It appears you have to make 5 posts first. :D Remove the space between the h ttp.
 

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Sorry to double post but I just thought of something else that I wanted to mention.


From what I have read, it is always a good idea to mount your PJ first and then make your screen. If your not mounting it then I guess there is no reason that you couldn't pre-build your screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My projector will be on a shelf, not ceiling mounted. Should I still wait??
 

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If it were me I would wait. Get the PJ in place with all the wires/cables run to it. Fire your PJ up and get an image on the wall to see what things look like and all. Once you are happy with placement I would then start my screen project. This also allows you to take measurements and see what kind of adjustments you can make while the image is on the wall instead of trying to move your PJ around to fit your screen.
 

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1) Is this correct: I need two 86" and two 51" pieces of wood?


If you are mitering the outer pieces at 45° and measuring long edge to long edge, the outer dimensions of your frame will be exactly that, 86X51. You want an 80X45 screen right? And you want a little room on the edges to nail a black border frame? Then leave an inch or so on each side, that will make the frame 82X47. Then the border will cover an inch of the screen making the finished viewing area 85X40.

If you don't want to miter the edges you can cut the pieces at 90°. Then your horizontal top pieces will be 82 but the vertical pieces will be 47 minus the width of the wood of the top & bottom (5 or 6"). It's sort of comon sense when you get it laid out. Have you done any woodworking before?

1b) If I want a support, would a single vertical one in the middle suffice?


For your screen size yes, it should be fine.

1c) Would I mount this support after doing the screen - or does this depend on #4 (mounting fabric)?


?? You want to build the frame first then put the fabric/screen on.

2) What type of wood is strong enough to hold the staples without cracking, and won't loosen over time? At the same time, I don't need anything over overkill or too heavy. I also don't need perfect, finished wood because I will be covering it (either with velvet or with another outer frame that has velvet on it).


I just used #2 pine and a staple gun. Not sure what size staples (1/3" maybe) but as long as you put enough staples in it should hold fine. Don't overdo it though.

3) If I do want to go with an inner and outer frame, how exactly do I do this? I have heard of people building the 1x3 frame, stretching the fabric, and then adding a type of trim to the front ... can someone give me details?


Lots of options here. Some build a frame out of molding (chair molding, window trim, etc) and paint it black then nail it on, some use regular 1X3, some wrap it in black fabric and nail it on, some just staple the fabric on, some use a fabric tape, some don't use any border and put black curtains or fabric behind it to get the same effect, etc. I just used cheap pieces of wood used for lattice and stapled black velvet around it, then nailed it on.

4) How can I ensure a tight, wrinkle free, installation of the fabric? I bought the raw material to staple. Option 1 would be to just staple the fabric to the back of the frame (that was my original plan). If I do that how do I make sure it is taut without stretching too much? Pull while stapling? line up and then start stapling? I bought an extra 2" around (86x49) just in case. Option 2 as I understand it is to stretch around the 1x3s (like a canvas), and then stapling.


Go to google and type in stretching canvas. It should bring up a lot of tutorials with pictures.

5) What is the best way to mount this to a wall? Brackets on the top corners put into beams in the wall? I don't know the distance between the beams but I can figure that out, I just need mounting options if you don't mind!


It will be fairly light, so if you want to mount it to a sheet rock wall you don't need to hit the studs (they are usually 16" on center by the way), just get some plastic drywall anchors from your local hardware store. FWIW I'm hanging mine from the ceiling on some thin chain from Home Depot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Chris:

You are a savior!!

I SOOO appreciate you taking the time to answer all of my questions so patiently and detailed!!!


Rick

Based on my measurements I know I can get the 92" diagonal. I was planning on just building it first, but not mounting until after the projector is set up. I wasn't going to mount the screen to my wall yet. I dont know if that was clear or not :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ian

What do you mean "eight angle pieces instead of four" ... are you referring to the L brackets that hold the frame ends together?
 

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I built my screen out of pine (hemlock probably) 1x3 material. It is about the size of yours. I had a vertical piece in the middle, and butted the ends with "pocket screws" x 2 at each joint plus a "biscuit". The exact method is probably not super critical. If you want to be sure your are square, measure each diagonal. If they match, you are square.


I had planned for splines, but by the time I finished I found splines to be a poor solution for blackout cloth. I ended up using staples. It is best done with 2 people and ceiling tile 9/16" staples. You can get it REALLY tight that way - ZERO wrinkles.


Once my screen was done I made an "overframe" out of mdf moulding, painted flat black. The painted blackout cloth screen (a DDOG ver 1 screen) was inserted into the frame, like a picture in a picture frame, and secured.


I added 1x2 corner braces at 45 degrees at the bottom corners.


I also added 3 1x2 peices connecting the top rail to the bottom rail. To that I screwed one half a 1x4 that I had ripped in half at a 45 degree bevel on the table saw. The one half I screwed to the upright 1x2's on the screen and the other half went on the wall screwed to studs. The screen rests on the wall mounted one half. Easy to remove anytime. My screen, mainly due to the MDF moulding was about 30 to 40 lbs I'd guess. Hope this helps you.


Chris
 

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I built a frame for my 96 x 54 screen using the same general technique that you have described. The key difference is that I used 4.5 inch floor moulding for the frame and then added a strip of chairrail moulding on the outer edge of the front face.


My word of caution to you is to use heavy duty angle irons and definitely use two per corner. The HCCV fabric, properly tensioned, exterts a great deal of torque on the corners. Your nicely mitered corners will try to bend in the direction of the frame. Of course, I attached my screen using the velcro method rather than staples, so YMMV.


David
 

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Unless you have a good power miter box, I would recommend butt joints. You can get your lumber store to cut your frame pieces, and it will be easier to get a squared frame.


I also recommend stapling the material to the front of the frame...makes it easier on the corners, and you can cover the staples with your mattes.
 
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